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Rosie Flores

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September 8, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
“Rockabilly filly” Rosie Flores returned to her Southland stamping ground Wednesday for the unveiling of a project obviously near and dear to her heart, “The Blanco Sessions” album she produced for '50s rockabilly singer and songwriter Janis Martin. The album comes out Sept. 18, but showcasing the material Martin sang for her first new recording in more than two decades falls to Flores. Shortly after working on the album in 2007 with Flores, Martin, then 67, learned she had cancer, and died a few months later.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
“Rockabilly filly” Rosie Flores returned to her Southland stamping ground Wednesday for the unveiling of a project obviously near and dear to her heart, “The Blanco Sessions” album she produced for '50s rockabilly singer and songwriter Janis Martin. The album comes out Sept. 18, but showcasing the material Martin sang for her first new recording in more than two decades falls to Flores. Shortly after working on the album in 2007 with Flores, Martin, then 67, learned she had cancer, and died a few months later.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1987 | STEVE HOCHMAN
While Rosie Flores' show Saturday at Club Lingerie may not have been as brash as the cow-punk the locally based Texan has made as one of the wild wimmin in the Screamin' Sirens, it was miles ahead of anything coming from even the most promising of Nashville's so-called new breed for pure excitement. Call it cow-spunk.
NEWS
January 3, 2002 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rosie Flores never got to see Elvis Presley. Back in 1977, when she was leading an obscure San Diego band called Rosie & the Screamers, the young roots-rocker had finally made plans to see Presley live when his tour was to pass through Southern California that year. But he died before ever leaving home. Presley's impact on her love of music was already secure, going back to the day an older cousin introduced her as a Texas toddler to the hit "Teddy Bear."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2001 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Rosie Flores isn't going soft. Not even close. The country/rockabilly traditionalist stood onstage in a fringe jacket at the Mint on Tuesday, picking and slashing at a turquoise electric guitar, as fiery and gracious as ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1989 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
When country singer Rosie Flores performs Sunday night at the Belly Up Tavern in Solana Beach, it will be a homecoming of sorts for the 34-year-old former San Diegan, recently crowned bA. Weekly as "the best new female country singer on record since the rise of the 'new traditionalists.' " A San Diego resident since she was 12, Flores spent most of the 1970s singing traditional country with local bands in local nightclubs, including the Belly Up. But when country went commercial with the success of the 1978 movie "Urban Cowboy," Flores decided to drop out rather than sell out. "Every crowd in every country bar I was in wanted to hear nothing but Johnny Lee songs and all this other pop stuff that the movie had famous," Flores recalled in a 1987 interview with The Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Ten years ago, at a time when "Women in Rock" stories were still trumpeting the likes of Grace Slick, Heart and Linda McCartney, a revolution was getting under way in Los Angeles. On the then-growing L.A. club scene, it was hard not to notice that--especially compared to certain Eastern burgs--a disproportionate number of those at the forefront of this city's scene were charismatic, gutsy, mercurial women: X's Exene Cervenka, the Motels' Martha Davis, the Go-Go's. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1992 | NOEL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nobody ever promised that the road to country stardom would be easy. Just as she was about to shift into high gear with her first major label recording contract, Rosie Flores found a series of unexpected roadblocks in her path. Flores, whose unique blend of traditional country, country rock and Tex-Mex music has been a longtime highlight of the Southern California country scene, seemed poised in the late '80s to follow fellow L.A. country scene star Dwight Yoakam to mainstream success.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS
In "Try Me," one of the dozen tunes Flores wrote or co-wrote for her third solo album, the L.A. based singer-songwriter sings: "No chip on my shoulder / Though I've been around/I've picked myself up / And I ain't goin' down / I've learned things the hard way / But like a rock I still stand / I may tumble and fall / But like a dancer I land." She not only expertly captures the sound of a woman who refuses to give in to romantic cynicism, she could also be describing her own career track.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If even Hurricane Andrew or the Big Bad Wolf couldn't disturb so much as a strand of your jellyroll haircut, if your shoes are pointier than your feet, your horoscope is something akin to "wahoo," and if your watch stopped around 1959, then tomorrow's your big night out. That is when you'll be able to head to the 4th Annual Rockabilly Roundup, which will be held Friday night at Fess Parker's Red Lion Resort in Santa Barbara as a benefit for C.A.L.M., and anti-child abuse organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2001 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Rosie Flores isn't going soft. Not even close. The country/rockabilly traditionalist stood onstage in a fringe jacket at the Mint on Tuesday, picking and slashing at a turquoise electric guitar, as fiery and gracious as ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2001
3 pm Music As part of SongFest 2001, young baritone Brandon Velarde will sing a wide-ranging recital of French songs accompanied by esteemed pianist Graham Johnson. Titled "Histoires d'une Liaison," the recital will transverse the stages of love affair from initial meeting, through happiness and marriage, to parting and recovery. Composers will include Gounod, Faure, Debussy, Poulenc, Ravel and others. Johnson will also give a pre-concert lecture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The brand of stinging roots-country music that singer-songwriter-guitarist Rosie Flores specializes in has long put her at odds with the conventional sounds and sentiments favored by the country establishment in Nashville. So after almost three decades carving her creative niche from headquarters first in Texas and then Southern California, it makes perfect sense that Flores has a new base of operations in . . . Nashville?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | RANDY LEWIS
The veteran Texas-L.A. country-rocker gets achingly personal and emotionally direct at times in another typically solid outing, the standout being her moving tribute to her late father, "Who's Gonna Fix It Now." Of course she rocks and swings like crazy, too, and uses her fetchingly gritty voice with unflagging sincerity. Flores plays tonight at 14 Below in Santa Monica. * Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like most people this time of year, maverick country singer-songwriter-guitarist Rosie Flores is plenty busy. But she managed to carve out a mini-vacation earlier this week in San Francisco between tour stops. While making time for an interview ahead of her performances this weekend in Los Angeles and Long Beach, the Texas-born, L.A.-based musician paused during that interview to note the arrival of a surprise visitor. "Oh, my God . . . this is beautiful," Flores said suddenly. "This huge bird .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Rosie Flores is the missing link between Brenda Lee and Bonnie Raitt, which may help explain why, as such a definably "country" artist, she was in both her element and the club's Saturday night at the blues joint Jacks Sugar Shack.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2001
3 pm Music As part of SongFest 2001, young baritone Brandon Velarde will sing a wide-ranging recital of French songs accompanied by esteemed pianist Graham Johnson. Titled "Histoires d'une Liaison," the recital will transverse the stages of love affair from initial meeting, through happiness and marriage, to parting and recovery. Composers will include Gounod, Faure, Debussy, Poulenc, Ravel and others. Johnson will also give a pre-concert lecture.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS
In "Try Me," one of the dozen tunes Flores wrote or co-wrote for her third solo album, the L.A. based singer-songwriter sings: "No chip on my shoulder / Though I've been around/I've picked myself up / And I ain't goin' down / I've learned things the hard way / But like a rock I still stand / I may tumble and fall / But like a dancer I land." She not only expertly captures the sound of a woman who refuses to give in to romantic cynicism, she could also be describing her own career track.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If even Hurricane Andrew or the Big Bad Wolf couldn't disturb so much as a strand of your jellyroll haircut, if your shoes are pointier than your feet, your horoscope is something akin to "wahoo," and if your watch stopped around 1959, then tomorrow's your big night out. That is when you'll be able to head to the 4th Annual Rockabilly Roundup, which will be held Friday night at Fess Parker's Red Lion Resort in Santa Barbara as a benefit for C.A.L.M., and anti-child abuse organization.
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