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October 2, 2002 | Associated Press
The publisher of Rosie magazine is filing a $100-million lawsuit against former talk show host Rosie O'Donnell for abruptly pulling out of their business partnership last month. Gruner & Jahr Printing & Publishing Co. said in court papers that O'Donnell's decision to quit Rosie magazine has or will cost it "in excess of $100 million in damages." The filing claims that O'Donnell, who announced Sept. 18 she was quitting the magazine, breached her contract and publicly disparaged the magazine.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 2004 | From Reuters
The judge in the dispute between Rosie O'Donnell and her former publisher over the folding of Rosie magazine said neither side was entitled to damages and that each should pay its own legal fees. Gruner & Jahr USA Publishing had sued the former TV talk show host for $100 million, saying she breached her contract by walking away in September 2002, over editorial differences. O'Donnell countersued for $125 million, saying the publisher had taken away her editorial control.
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BUSINESS
November 13, 2003 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
The bitter lawsuit pitting Rosie O'Donnell against her former publisher -- a battle that attracted more attention than the short-lived Rosie magazine ever did -- fizzled out Wednesday when the judge said neither side deserved damages because it's doubtful the magazine would have made any money.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2003 | From Reuters
Gruner & Jahr's bitter court fight with Rosie O'Donnell ended in a stalemate, but the publisher is nonetheless paying a price for the battle. Gruner & Jahr USA Publishing, a unit of Germany's Bertelsmann, is under increased scrutiny from advertisers over the accuracy of its sales numbers. It already has seen a top executive quit amid fallout from the case.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2003 | From Reuters
Rosie O'Donnell and her former publishing partner are set to face off in a New York court this week in a much-hyped breach-of-contract battle following the messy demise of the entertainer's namesake magazine. O'Donnell, known for her brashness and liberal views, was once dubbed the "Queen of Nice" by her fans. But former partner Gruner + Jahr USA Publishing says otherwise.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2004 | From Reuters
The judge in the dispute between Rosie O'Donnell and her former publisher over the folding of Rosie magazine said neither side was entitled to damages and that each should pay its own legal fees. Gruner & Jahr USA Publishing had sued the former TV talk show host for $100 million, saying she breached her contract by walking away in September 2002, over editorial differences. O'Donnell countersued for $125 million, saying the publisher had taken away her editorial control.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2003 | From Associated Press
A cancer survivor burst into tears Wednesday when she testified that Rosie O'Donnell had suggested she was lying about goings-on at her now-defunct magazine and told her that liars get cancer. Cindy Spengler, who was head of marketing at Rosie magazine, said O'Donnell made the remark after a meeting to discuss the magazine's problems. Spengler said O'Donnell called and told her that her silence in the meeting was tantamount to lying.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Rosie O'Donnell said Friday that her publisher had deceived her about how Rosie magazine would be run and that she was the victim of a "coup d'etat." O'Donnell, finishing her testimony in a breach-of-contract case in state Supreme Court in Manhattan, said she had entered the joint venture with Gruner & Jahr USA believing she controlled the editorial content and staff of the magazine. By the end of the summer of 2002, she said, she believed that was no longer true.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2002 | CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosie O'Donnell packed up her name Wednesday and walked out on the magazine business. After feuding for months with the publisher of Rosie magazine, the former talk show host said her editorial control was being diminished by executives whom she accused of smearing her reputation. "I cannot have my name on a magazine if I cannot be assured that it will represent my vision and ideas," O'Donnell said in a statement.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2003 | From Reuters
Gruner & Jahr's bitter court fight with Rosie O'Donnell ended in a stalemate, but the publisher is nonetheless paying a price for the battle. Gruner & Jahr USA Publishing, a unit of Germany's Bertelsmann, is under increased scrutiny from advertisers over the accuracy of its sales numbers. It already has seen a top executive quit amid fallout from the case.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2003 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
The bitter lawsuit pitting Rosie O'Donnell against her former publisher -- a battle that attracted more attention than the short-lived Rosie magazine ever did -- fizzled out Wednesday when the judge said neither side deserved damages because it's doubtful the magazine would have made any money.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Rosie O'Donnell said Friday that her publisher had deceived her about how Rosie magazine would be run and that she was the victim of a "coup d'etat." O'Donnell, finishing her testimony in a breach-of-contract case in state Supreme Court in Manhattan, said she had entered the joint venture with Gruner & Jahr USA believing she controlled the editorial content and staff of the magazine. By the end of the summer of 2002, she said, she believed that was no longer true.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2003 | From Associated Press
A cancer survivor burst into tears Wednesday when she testified that Rosie O'Donnell had suggested she was lying about goings-on at her now-defunct magazine and told her that liars get cancer. Cindy Spengler, who was head of marketing at Rosie magazine, said O'Donnell made the remark after a meeting to discuss the magazine's problems. Spengler said O'Donnell called and told her that her silence in the meeting was tantamount to lying.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2003 | From Reuters
Rosie O'Donnell and her former publishing partner are set to face off in a New York court this week in a much-hyped breach-of-contract battle following the messy demise of the entertainer's namesake magazine. O'Donnell, known for her brashness and liberal views, was once dubbed the "Queen of Nice" by her fans. But former partner Gruner + Jahr USA Publishing says otherwise.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2002 | Associated Press
The publisher of Rosie magazine is filing a $100-million lawsuit against former talk show host Rosie O'Donnell for abruptly pulling out of their business partnership last month. Gruner & Jahr Printing & Publishing Co. said in court papers that O'Donnell's decision to quit Rosie magazine has or will cost it "in excess of $100 million in damages." The filing claims that O'Donnell, who announced Sept. 18 she was quitting the magazine, breached her contract and publicly disparaged the magazine.
NEWS
September 20, 2002 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To her readers, it should have been obvious: Rosie O'Donnell--the bighearted former talk-show host and renowned "queen of nice"--was missing from the cover of Rosie, her own magazine. Gone were the days of O'Donnell hugging Fran Drescher, goofing with Donny Osmond and posing in her hospital gown. After seemingly endless covers of O'Donnell mugging with celebs and yukking it up for the camera, she was slowly being replaced. In September it was "The Sopranos." In October it's Celine Dion.
NEWS
September 20, 2002 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To her readers, it should have been obvious: Rosie O'Donnell--the bighearted former talk-show host and renowned "queen of nice"--was missing from the cover of Rosie, her own magazine. Gone were the days of O'Donnell hugging Fran Drescher, goofing with Donny Osmond and posing in her hospital gown. After seemingly endless covers of O'Donnell mugging with celebs and yukking it up for the camera, she was slowly being replaced. In September it was "The Sopranos." In October it's Celine Dion.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
Rosie O'Donnell told the editor of her now-defunct magazine that because she was a lesbian she strongly objected to a cover photo showing the entertainer with her arms around other women, according to testimony Monday. Susan Toepfer, who became editor in chief in July 2002, said the photo was shot for Rosie magazine's September 2002 cover. Both sides agree the cover started a fight that led to the magazine's demise. The cover featured women from the TV show "The Sopranos," Toepfer said.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2002 | CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosie O'Donnell packed up her name Wednesday and walked out on the magazine business. After feuding for months with the publisher of Rosie magazine, the former talk show host said her editorial control was being diminished by executives whom she accused of smearing her reputation. "I cannot have my name on a magazine if I cannot be assured that it will represent my vision and ideas," O'Donnell said in a statement.
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