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Rosie O Donnell

NEWS
March 14, 2002 | GINA PICCALO AND LOUISE ROUG
Director Alfonso Cuaron wiped his brow. "I feel so blessed," he said, beaming. "I'm so happy." It was very hot where Cuaron was standing: in the thick of an adoring crowd at the Argyle on Sunset Boulevard on Tuesday night. Cuaron had good reason to smile. At the West Coast premiere of his new movie, "Y Tu Mama Tambien" (And Your Mama Too), at the Regent Showcase Theatre on La Brea Avenue earlier Tuesday night, there were not enough seats to accommodate the many guests who showed up (though if you were Gwyneth Paltrow or Madonna's brother, Christopher Ciccone, seating was not a problem)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Rosie O'Donnell set out to make her mark in daytime talk, she modeled "The Rosie O'Donnell Show" after the chat fests of daytime pioneers Merv Griffin and Mike Douglas. An unabashed fan of all things television, O'Donnell, 35, grew up enthralled with Griffin's Emmy-winning show, which was seen in syndication and on CBS from 1965 to 1986. Griffin, 72, also created the long-running game shows "Jeopardy!"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2007 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
Rosie O'Donnell's turbulent tenure on "The View" officially came to an end Friday as ABC announced that the outspoken comedian had asked to be let out of her contract nearly a month early. O'Donnell's abrupt exit from the program comes two days after she and co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck quarreled bitterly on the air over statements O'Donnell had made about the war in Iraq. After their fight, O'Donnell hinted on her personal blog that she did not want to return to the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2007 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
Rosie O'Donnell has only a month left on "The View," but after engaging in a bitter on-air clash Wednesday with co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck, she appears ready to leave the ABC daytime program any day now. The two women have sparred about politics all season. But their debate erupted into a heated quarrel Wednesday when O'Donnell complained that the younger woman has failed to defend her against conservative critics.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2012 | By Meg James and Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
"A queen is not afraid to fail," Oprah Winfrey once said. "Failure is another steppingstone to greatness. " Now the television queen may have a chance to prove the adage. Her Los Angeles-based Oprah Winfrey Network has been hobbled by missteps, ego clashes, a revolving door in the executive suite and, most important, low ratings. OWN's stumbles suggest, at the least, that even in celebrity-obsessed America, fame alone doesn't guarantee success. PHOTOS: 25 great "Oprah" moments The network was born 15 months ago with high hopes of becoming the television equivalent of Winfrey's O magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
How dare she! That dangerous rebel Rosie O'Donnell paid the price last week--a teed-off Tom Selleck--for breaking the First and Second Commandments of hosting a celebrity-driven talk show: Thou shalt not digress from the plug. Thou shalt not ask a serious question that may evoke a serious response. What was she thinking Wednesday when asking Selleck about positions taken by the National Rifle Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, Chris Willman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
The news that "Lethal Weapon 3" grossed an astonishing $33 million in its opening weekend no doubt inspired a jealously Pavlovian response among many moviegoers: America loves it! Darling, we simply must go out and be counted as part of this record-shattering box-office phenomenon! And then there's the reaction that word of any such boffo business induces among the smaller percentage of us: Good lord, think of the lines! Let's cocoon!
BUSINESS
September 19, 2002 | CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosie O'Donnell packed up her name Wednesday and walked out on the magazine business. After feuding for months with the publisher of Rosie magazine, the former talk show host said her editorial control was being diminished by executives whom she accused of smearing her reputation. "I cannot have my name on a magazine if I cannot be assured that it will represent my vision and ideas," O'Donnell said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1998 | JOHN DART
Can churches learn from popular daytime television host Rosie O'Donnell? Yes, particularly when it comes to creating community, making charity fun and paying attention to children and senior citizens, says Laura Simmons, a doctoral student at Fuller Theological Seminary. Simmons said that the actress and TV talk show host helps create a sense of community by handing out small cakes to her audiences sitting in the studio or waiting in line before her shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2008 | Denise Martin
While promoting her upcoming NBC variety special, "Rosie Live," Rosie O'Donnell couldn't avoid questions about her controversial time on "The View." Barbara Walters, she told reporters on Wednesday morning, "wanted everyone to believe and think and act as if [the women on 'The View'] get along and are really good friends and happy and hang out together, and, you know, that's just not the reality.
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