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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Are you ready for L.A. Live, San Gabriel Valley edition? The downtown entertainment complex may get a cousin of sorts 23 miles to the east if billionaire developer Edward Roski Jr. has his way. So far, coverage of Roski's proposal to build a 75,000-seat, $800-million stadium in City of Industry has focused on its potential to bring professional football back to the Los Angeles area after an absence of 15 years. But Roski's plan doesn't just call for a stadium. It sees the football facility as the centerpiece of a 592-acre mixed-use complex including shops, restaurants, offices and an extensive network of surface parking lots.
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SPORTS
October 9, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
As far as the NFL and Los Angeles go, all is quiet on the Western front. Or maybe we just need to look more closely. The leading location remains AEG's downtown Farmers Field. Phil Anschutz's exclusive bargaining window is open until November 2014. It is "shovel-ready," as developers say. Money is in the bank. Entitlements have been taken care of. AEG is an owner-landlord in waiting. It is a quieter effort now, since Tim Leiweke left AEG. He was effective, hard-charging, persuasive, but never quiet.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1999
Re "Roski Presses Deal to Run Coliseum," Feb. 9: The NFL may need Los Angeles, but Los Angeles does not need the NFL. The absence of professional football from the country's second-biggest market may have lowered TV ratings a bit, but our city and county have not been harmed one whit. We will be harmed if we continue to tolerate elected officials meeting in secret with private entrepreneurs under pressure from artificial deadlines. If Ed Roski and Eli Broad are so eager to make a deal with the NFL, let them.
SPORTS
September 30, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
The Stanley Cup made its first public appearance Saturday since the Kings' names were inscribed on it, and the updated trophy contained a surprise. The name of club co-owner Ed Roski, omitted from the original list submitted to the NHL and the Hockey Hall of Fame, is on the top line following the names of owner Phil Anschutz, Anschutz's wife, Nancy, and Tim Leiweke, head of the Kings' parent company. That gave the Kings 53 names on the Cup, one above the limit, but Roski's ownership role was considered important enough for the league to add his name.
OPINION
September 26, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
In Southern California, property development is a full-contact sport, and nobody plays the game with quite the brio of Industry-based Majestic Realty Co. Its chairman and CEO, Ed Roski Jr., is an ex-Marine who turned the successful commercial real estate brokerage that his father founded into one of the nation's biggest industrial property developers, making himself a billionaire in the process. Along with Denver billionaire Phil Anschutz, Roski developed Staples Center and the successful L.A. Live project that adjoins it. He retains a minority interest in both the Lakers and the Kings.
SPORTS
September 25, 2009 | SAM FARMER, ON THE NFL
The pieces appear to be falling into place for an NFL stadium in the city of Industry, but does that mean a team is on its way? Los Angeles developer Ed Roski Jr. cleared a significant legal hurdle this week when the city of Walnut agreed to drop a lawsuit intended to block the plan. Here are some answers to the most pertinent questions about where the league is on the issue of returning to the nation's second-largest market: Does this mean an NFL team is coming to Los Angeles?
OPINION
October 29, 2009 | Dave Zirin, Dave Zirin is the author of "A People's History of Sports in the United States."
Afew miles outside of Los Angeles, in a business-tax-free haven of strip malls and strip clubs called the city of Industry -- under 800 residents and fewer than 100 voters -- ground is ready to be broken for an $800-million football stadium. The team to play there is yet to be determined. But the hope is that a wayward owner longing for luxury boxes will want to call it home. The deal was celebrated by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger as both environmentally friendly and fiscally responsible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2009 | Jean Merl
He likes to trace his political activism to his days as a high school volunteer for conservative icon Barry Goldwater's 1964 presidential campaign. She talks proudly of being a Goldwater Girl. He insists there's plenty of money in Sacramento; it's just allocated incorrectly. She says state government tries to do too much. When their campaigns are not busy trading attacks -- and there have been plenty of those -- Orange County Supervisor Chris Norby, 59, and longtime GOP activist Linda Ackerman, 65, are pushing to outdo each other in conservative credentials.
SPORTS
February 17, 2011 | CHRIS ERSKINE
Lest you think I am merely another pretty-boy sportswriter, I offer up this serious proposal: a new NFL stadium, at the corner of 2nd and Spring streets in downtown Los Angeles. Sure, there's a major newspaper there now ? this one ? but don't mind that. This is the perfect location, right across the street from the LAPD and catty-corner from City Hall. It represents a holy trinity: media, cops, crooks. When some city inspector is busted for taking a bribe, we'll get that story to you yesterday.
SPORTS
September 30, 1995 | LISA DILLMAN
As expected, the NHL's Board of Governors on Friday approved the sale of the Kings to Denver billionaire Philip F. Anschutz and local developer Edward P. Roski Jr. The board, meeting in New York, voted unanimously on the pending transaction, which now faces a Thursday hearing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. The hearing is expected to be a formality, though there is a remote possibility of an overbid offer.
SPORTS
October 11, 2011 | Sam Farmer
Reporting from Houston — The NFL stadium derby in Southern California is likely to get more interesting and competitive. Real estate magnate Ed Roski, whose bid for a stadium in City of Industry has for months been lost in the shadows of a rival proposal next to Staples Center, has changed his offer to teams eyeing a relocation. Roski has dropped his demand for a no-cash minority share of a franchise and instead is offering to hand over the 600 acres he controls to any team that relocates there.
SPORTS
August 12, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
The big headlines and media noise swirling around the proposed downtown stadium have given new life to the nearly forgotten concept that the NFL might have a team in Los Angeles again. One thing is certain. Tim Leiweke and his Anschutz Entertainment Group have won the battle of perception. The only way Leiweke could have made a bigger splash would have been to don a Paul Revere hat and ride through the streets of Los Angeles, yelling: "The NFL is coming! The NFL is coming!" The implication of his proposed site, next to Staples Center, is that it would make L.A. Live even livelier.
SPORTS
July 25, 2011 | By Sam Farmer
Once the dust settles on the NFL's new labor agreement, will the league finally start pushing dirt in Los Angeles? That's what backers of the competing L.A. stadium proposals are hoping, that team owners will turn their attention to the nation's second-largest market now that their first-largest nightmare — a bitter fight with the players — is over. "For us, the timing is perfect because it's coming at the same time we're finishing what no one thought we could do, which is a deal with the city," said AEG's Tim Leiweke, who hopes to know by the end of the month whether the L.A. City Council will issue roughly $300 million in bonds and approve the just-completed memorandum of understanding for a stadium deal.
SPORTS
June 29, 2011 | By Sam Farmer
The battle of NFL proposals has taken another interesting turn. AEG, pushing for a downtown stadium, announced Wednesday that it has selected Populous as the architectural firm to design the relocated West Hall of the Convention Center, which sits on the proposed site of Farmers Field. A senior principal at Populous is Staples Center architect Dan Meis, who designed Ed Roski's proposed City of Industry stadium. Populous, a global firm with offices worldwide, including a Los Angeles office, now will turn its attention solely to the downtown site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
State Sen. Bob Huff, who is working aggressively to save California's redevelopment agencies, says Gov. Jerry Brown's plan to abolish them is legally dubious, would cost jobs and would eliminate one of the state's few tools for spurring economic development. What the Diamond Bar Republican doesn't include in his pitch is that his wife is a paid consultant for a large developer eager to keep the program intact. The developer, Ed Roski Jr., owner of Majestic Realty, has industrial and commercial properties across Southern California, many of them in redevelopment zones that have been spruced up with tax dollars.
SPORTS
February 17, 2011 | CHRIS ERSKINE
Lest you think I am merely another pretty-boy sportswriter, I offer up this serious proposal: a new NFL stadium, at the corner of 2nd and Spring streets in downtown Los Angeles. Sure, there's a major newspaper there now ? this one ? but don't mind that. This is the perfect location, right across the street from the LAPD and catty-corner from City Hall. It represents a holy trinity: media, cops, crooks. When some city inspector is busted for taking a bribe, we'll get that story to you yesterday.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2002 | From a Times staff writer
Majestic Realty Co., one of the nation's largest industrial and commercial real estate developers, named David A. Wheeler as president. Wheeler, 47, succeeds Edward P. Roski Jr., who will remain as chairman of the board and chief executive of the City of Industry-based company. Wheeler joined Majestic Realty in 1977 and has been involved in the development of some of the company's large master-planned business and industrial parks. Wheeler is also a member of the company's board.
SPORTS
November 5, 1998 | JIM HODGES
Adding to its array of properties in its attempt to become the dominant player in Southern California sports, L.A. Arena Co. and its majority owners, Philip Anschutz and Ed Roski, have exercised an option to buy 25% of the Lakers. Terms of the deal, announced Wednesday, were not disclosed. The option was granted on June 14, 1996, in conjunction with the Lakers' agreeing to become a tenant in the new Staples Center, a $300-plus million, 20,000-seat downtown facility that will also house L.A.
SPORTS
February 7, 2011 | By Sam Farmer
Even though his competition in downtown Los Angeles has landed a record-setting deal for naming rights ? and the quiet favor of many NFL owners and executives ? real estate magnate Ed Roski is far from losing hope on his stadium concept in City of Industry. Roski still thinks his plan is the best option to bring the NFL back to the L.A. area, and says he has no intention of ever throwing his weight behind the competing project, proposed for a site next to Staples Center. "No way," he said over breakfast in Dallas, where Sunday he attended the Super Bowl in neighboring Arlington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy
Ed Roski Jr., the L.A. County billionaire who got state legislators to exempt his proposed NFL stadium from environmental laws, has showered the lawmakers with tens of thousands of dollars in campaign cash. The money is part of $505,000 that Roski put into California political campaigns during the second half of 2009, including $300,000 toward a proposed ballot measure that would change term limits for future legislators. The contributions are significantly higher than in the previous six months, when Roski doled out $49,000.
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