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BUSINESS
May 5, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a marriage of powerful but controversial technologies, Geron Corp. said Tuesday that it has acquired Roslin Bio-Med, a spinoff of the Scottish institute responsible for the cloned sheep, Dolly. The goal is to combine the expertise of the two small biotechnology companies to clone human cells that can be used to repair damaged hearts, livers and kidneys--and perhaps one day grow replacement organs for transplantation. Menlo Park, Calif.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2012 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Keith H.S. Campbell, a noted biologist who was a key member of the British team that cloned Dolly the sheep, has died. He was 58. The University of Nottingham, where Campbell worked, said he died Oct. 5 but released no other details. In 1991, Campbell began researching animal cloning at the Roslin Institute near Edinburgh, conducting experiments that led to the 1996 birth of Dolly the sheep, the first mammal to be cloned from an adult cell. He was credited with an important insight that made the experiment work: Campbell realized it was necessary to make sure that the donor cell and the egg were both in the same stage of development, Ian Wilmut, the scientist who led the Roslin team, told The Times in 1997.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2012 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Keith H.S. Campbell, a noted biologist who was a key member of the British team that cloned Dolly the sheep, has died. He was 58. The University of Nottingham, where Campbell worked, said he died Oct. 5 but released no other details. In 1991, Campbell began researching animal cloning at the Roslin Institute near Edinburgh, conducting experiments that led to the 1996 birth of Dolly the sheep, the first mammal to be cloned from an adult cell. He was credited with an important insight that made the experiment work: Campbell realized it was necessary to make sure that the donor cell and the egg were both in the same stage of development, Ian Wilmut, the scientist who led the Roslin team, told The Times in 1997.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a marriage of powerful but controversial technologies, Geron Corp. said Tuesday that it has acquired Roslin Bio-Med, a spinoff of the Scottish institute responsible for the cloned sheep, Dolly. The goal is to combine the expertise of the two small biotechnology companies to clone human cells that can be used to repair damaged hearts, livers and kidneys--and perhaps one day grow replacement organs for transplantation. Menlo Park, Calif.
NEWS
February 25, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dolly the sheep, history's first animal cloned from an adult mammal, takes after her mom and grazes in pampered comfort on a research farm here. Dolly's sudden fame is gratifying--but hardly surprising--to the researchers who have brought the frontiers of science to the green Scottish farmland.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Scottish researchers announced Thursday that they have combined genetic engineering and cloning to create three identical lambs that each contain the same human gene. By creating the trans-genic triplets, the researchers have demonstrated a new technique that could accelerate the production of cloned livestock, customized to produce pharmaceutical products. Biomedical experts say the feat also brings the world one step closer to the genetic engineering of human beings.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | Reuters
Britain's Agriculture Ministry is to stop funding the project that produced Dolly, the first cloned sheep, the Daily Telegraph reported today. Ian Wilmut and colleagues at Scotland's Roslin Institute and biotechnology company PPL Therapeutics caused a global uproar when they announced that they had cloned a sheep. It was the first time an adult animal had been successfully cloned. But the paper said that ministry funding would be cut in half next month and withdrawn in April of next year.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Geron Corp. and Advanced Cell Technology Inc. agreed to settle a patent dispute over a pioneering cloning technology that led to the creation of Dolly the sheep. Advanced Cell and the University of Massachusetts agreed to end their appeal and give up certain patents for animal cloning technology while keeping rights to a cloning method for human use, Advanced Cell said. Menlo Park, Calif.-based Geron keeps the rights to use the technology in animal cloning.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | Associated Press
Scientists who helped engineer the first cloned sheep are close to generating human blood plasma from animals, a newspaper reported today. PPL Therapeutics, the Scottish firm that helped Edinburgh's Roslin Institute clone a sheep, is developing the means to replace the plasma genes of sheep and cows with the human equivalent, according to the Observer, a respected weekly newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
British researchers said they have used a revolutionary technique to clone sheep for the first time and that their advance could revolutionize livestock breeding. The researchers report in today's edition of the journal Nature that their method could be used to manufacture large numbers of identical animals that would produce genetically manipulated meat and milk on factory farms. Ian Wilmutand and colleagues at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh grew cells from a sheep embryo.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Scottish researchers announced Thursday that they have combined genetic engineering and cloning to create three identical lambs that each contain the same human gene. By creating the trans-genic triplets, the researchers have demonstrated a new technique that could accelerate the production of cloned livestock, customized to produce pharmaceutical products. Biomedical experts say the feat also brings the world one step closer to the genetic engineering of human beings.
NEWS
February 25, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dolly the sheep, history's first animal cloned from an adult mammal, takes after her mom and grazes in pampered comfort on a research farm here. Dolly's sudden fame is gratifying--but hardly surprising--to the researchers who have brought the frontiers of science to the green Scottish farmland.
NEWS
July 23, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Dolly the clone is no longer alone. Resolving doubts about the authenticity of cloning, an international research team has produced three generations of cloned laboratory mice from adult cells, the group announced Wednesday. At the same time, two laboratories separately confirmed the unique genetic pedigree of the cloned sheep Dolly, whose creation triggered a worldwide furor.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
A cloned ox that gestated in the womb of a cow in a scientific first died of an ordinary disease this week, two days after it was born, scientists said Friday. Scientists claimed bittersweet victory in the experiment, which used technology they hope can help shore up the numbers of endangered Asian gaur (pronounced "gower"). The baby bull was born Monday at TransOva Genetics in Sioux Center, Iowa, and died of common dysentery Wednesday.
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