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Ross Bleckner

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December 8, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
When New York artist Ross Bleckner arrived in Los Angeles three weeks ago to oversee the installation of his first exhibition here in five years, he went straight from the airport not to the Fred Hoffman Gallery, but to the set of "Cheers." A longtime pal of the show's producer James Burrows (who's also a contemporary collector of some note), Bleckner had been invited to appear as an extra and he jumped at the chance; he can be seen loitering at the bar in an episode airing sometime in January.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1996 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Kohn Turner Gallery, Darren Waterston's dark paintings of cascading flowers, dappled lights and feathery leaves look as if they might have something like languor in mind. In fact, their pleasures have to do with flexing the eyeball, with tracing the artist's elegantly attenuated, sometimes impossibly refined line. This exercise makes it clear that Waterston's skittishness is contagious. No one could argue with the fact that this work is stunning.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1996 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Kohn Turner Gallery, Darren Waterston's dark paintings of cascading flowers, dappled lights and feathery leaves look as if they might have something like languor in mind. In fact, their pleasures have to do with flexing the eyeball, with tracing the artist's elegantly attenuated, sometimes impossibly refined line. This exercise makes it clear that Waterston's skittishness is contagious. No one could argue with the fact that this work is stunning.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
When New York artist Ross Bleckner arrived in Los Angeles three weeks ago to oversee the installation of his first exhibition here in five years, he went straight from the airport not to the Fred Hoffman Gallery, but to the set of "Cheers." A longtime pal of the show's producer James Burrows (who's also a contemporary collector of some note), Bleckner had been invited to appear as an extra and he jumped at the chance; he can be seen loitering at the bar in an episode airing sometime in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1988 | Clarke Taylor
It was the single most successful private-sector effort to date to raise funds for AIDS education and research. This according to organizers of NYC's Art Against AIDS, who claim profits of more than $2.5 million to benefit the American Foundation for AIDS Research (Amfar). The marathon event--a six-month citywide gallery sale of works by 600 artists--included works by such 20th-Century luminaries as Picasso, Giacometti, Pollock, Nevelson and Hockney.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By David Ng
Eli Broad is donating 19 works of art from his collection to the new museum at Michigan State University in East Lansing that bears his name. The Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum is set to be dedicated Nov. 10. The donation includes the large-scale Roxy Paine sculpture "Containment 1," which will be displayed outdoors. The other works of art include pieces in various media by Robert Longo, Ross Bleckner, Elizabeth Murray, Sue Williams, Terry Winters, Donald Baechler, Jonathan Borofsky, Peter Halley and Jonathan Lasker.  The Broads gave $26 million to MSU in 2007 for the creation of the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
Despite earthly temblors and financial tumblers, L.A. galleries keep opening like there was no tomorrow--or rather like there will be a tomorrow. Margo Leavin's gallery is hardly new; it is rather among the bulwarks of the local establishment, but she is expanding her Robertson Boulevard operation in such a dramatic way that it amounts to a fresh start.
NEWS
March 29, 1995 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: The black-tie, if-we're-not-heirs-to Swifty-than-who-is? viewing party and post-telecast reception at Morton's hosted by Vanity Fair's Graydon Carter and "Forrest Gump" producer Steve Tisch. Here was a wildly eclectic range of talent, socialites and power brokers. "We wanted it to reflect the magazine," said Carter. "Washington, L.A., New York, Old Hollywood, New Hollywood, the whole thing."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"The revival of Conceptual Art in the last five years can be traced to some extent to CalArts graduates who moved to New York," said journalist Richard B. Woodward in a recent article in the New York Times. "CalArts students have swarmed over both coasts like a pack of elite professional soldiers." Like the Bauhaus in the '30s, Los Angeles' California Institute of the Arts revolutionized art school in the '80s. A small private academy located in the Valencia area, CalArts took higher learning out of the ivory tower and into the marketplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2002 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
A young Muhammad Ali stared over the shoulder of the evening's guest of honor, art collector Richard Weisman, his come-and-get-me stance amped by Andy Warhol and warmly lit inside Cheryl Tiegs' high-beamed, woody living room. Cans of Campbell's soup were positioned throughout the house in homage to the artist. A white-bearded Ed Ruscha lumbered around in a long black coat carrying a giant red martini, resembling a slim, smartly dressed Santa Claus. Tiegs' ex-husband Tony Peck (No.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | TIMOTHY HAWKINS
It's "in vogue." But not actually in Vogue, the fashion magazine. It's called "vogue-ing," and it's the latest phenomenon to hit the streets of this city since break-dancing. Young men move down a runway like the world's highest-paid fashion models but in fast-frame movements, striking stylized poses in quick succession combined with an athleticism akin to gymnastics. It's inspired by the attitude of the $4,000-a-day mega-models who are the stars of the designer runways and glossy magazine pages, epitomized by Vogue, probably the world's best-known fashion publication.
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