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Ross Mcelwee

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NEWS
July 8, 1993 | LISA HOPPER
Don't let the documentary tag deter you from grabbing "Sherman's March" off the video store shelf. It's not your typical fact-packed movie. Although filmmaker Ross McElwee began his project with the apparent intention of retracing Union Gen. William T. Sherman's Civil War path of destruction through the South, history is forgotten as McElwee is distracted by the women he discovers along his journey.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2004 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
It seems somehow appropriate that when the title card comes up on "Bright Leaves" the credit reads simply "by Ross McElwee." Like the first page of a novel, its literalness (there were no hordes of producers) as well as its simplicity is a fitting start for McElwee's latest documentary film, a multi-stranded exploration of tobacco in the South, the culture of smoking and the construction of his own family's identity and history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Bright Leaves" is yet another of documentarian Ross McElwee's droll, irresistible, multilayered, multifaceted journeys through the beguiling yet contradictory land of his youth, North Carolina -- and inevitably through his own heart and soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Bright Leaves" is yet another of documentarian Ross McElwee's droll, irresistible, multilayered, multifaceted journeys through the beguiling yet contradictory land of his youth, North Carolina -- and inevitably through his own heart and soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Two-thirds of the way through, the original and sneakily endearing "Sherman's March" (opening at the Nuart today for one week) bursts wide open. We watch as Harvard-based documentarian Ross McElwee, planning a 1981 film about the lingering effects of William Tecumseh Sherman's calamitous march, gets hopelessly off the track when his girlfriend abandons him. Bruised and broody, he goes home to the comfortable surroundings of his North Carolina clan to sort things out.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2004 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
It seems somehow appropriate that when the title card comes up on "Bright Leaves" the credit reads simply "by Ross McElwee." Like the first page of a novel, its literalness (there were no hordes of producers) as well as its simplicity is a fitting start for McElwee's latest documentary film, a multi-stranded exploration of tobacco in the South, the culture of smoking and the construction of his own family's identity and history.
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | Peter Rainer
Documentary maker Ross McElwee's follow-up to his cult hit "Sherman's March," follows his life in the recent past. He attends a family reunion in Charlotte, N.C., is married and endures a series of unforeseen sorrows. What starts out as jaunty and dawdling becomes a kind of meditation on mortality. But McElwee (pictured, with friend Charleen Swansea) doesn't make you wince at his seriousness. His bafflement at what is going on in his life is a genuine, unadorned response to tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Movie lovers got a first look at Woody Allen's new "Radio Days" and viewed a mini-Oscar ceremony for independently produced films as the ninth annual United States Film Festival in Park City, Utah, wound to a close Saturday night. Independent films winning $2,500 awards were "Sherman's March," a documentary directed and produced by Ross McElwee; "Waiting for the Moon," directed by Jill Godmilow and starring Linda Hunt, and "Trouble with Dick," produced and directed by Gary Walkow.
NEWS
March 3, 1996 | Michael Wilmington
This original and sneakily endearing project by Ross McElwee tells of how the Harvard-based documentarian's intended film on the lingering effects of Sherman's calamitous march through the South turns into his own doggedly optimistic pursuit of love once his girlfriend abandons him. Among the women McElwee meets is Pat, pictured, an actress who wants to meet Burt Reynolds. This 1986 film is a quirky, unexpected gem (Bravo Friday at 8:05 p.m., Saturday at 11:15 a.m. and Sunday at midnight).
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | LISA HOPPER
Don't let the documentary tag deter you from grabbing "Sherman's March" off the video store shelf. It's not your typical fact-packed movie. Although filmmaker Ross McElwee began his project with the apparent intention of retracing Union Gen. William T. Sherman's Civil War path of destruction through the South, history is forgotten as McElwee is distracted by the women he discovers along his journey.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Two-thirds of the way through, the original and sneakily endearing "Sherman's March" (opening at the Nuart today for one week) bursts wide open. We watch as Harvard-based documentarian Ross McElwee, planning a 1981 film about the lingering effects of William Tecumseh Sherman's calamitous march, gets hopelessly off the track when his girlfriend abandons him. Bruised and broody, he goes home to the comfortable surroundings of his North Carolina clan to sort things out.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ross McElwee is a documentarian of a very special sort. Although he's made movies about subjects like Cape Canaveral and the Berlin Wall, his flair is for the kind of self-examining "personal" film that, to the untutored eye, resembles a home movie. "Sherman's March," his surprise art-house success seven years ago, was made on the heels of a breakup with his girlfriend as he followed the route of Sherman's march on Atlanta.
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