Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoss Milloy
IN THE NEWS

Ross Milloy

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1989
Goodwin's column fuels frustration and fear. I hope my ensuing comments will assuage the concerns of those who worry about the "buying up of America" by the Japanese, Germans, Dutch et al. Worry not, because it's money coming back to the U.S. It helps to alleviate our budget deficit; and in many cases it means more employment and an infusion of new technology and managerial techniques. Remember, America has been investing in foreign countries for decades, doing precisely the same thing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1989
Goodwin's column fuels frustration and fear. I hope my ensuing comments will assuage the concerns of those who worry about the "buying up of America" by the Japanese, Germans, Dutch et al. Worry not, because it's money coming back to the U.S. It helps to alleviate our budget deficit; and in many cases it means more employment and an infusion of new technology and managerial techniques. Remember, America has been investing in foreign countries for decades, doing precisely the same thing.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1986 | Morgan Gendel
Hunter Thompson's minions are in town, trying to drum up interest in a movie/videocassette/TV project from the world's best-known gonzo journalist. "A hipster's '60 Minutes,' " is how producer Ross Milloy refers to the proposed documentary-like program that he and pal Thompson tentatively call "Hunter Thompson on Patrol." "Or a sort of non-fiction version of 'Saturday Night Live.'
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
While American soldiers were fighting in France during World War I, their families were plagued at home by a flu epidemic that brought more deaths to many families than the battlefield did. In "1918" (at Los Feliz, Monica 4-Plex and Town & Country) writer Horton Foote attempts to portray the impact of that distant war and that all-too-near epidemic on a small-town Texas family modeled after his own.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
As flies to wanton boys, are we to the Gods; they kill us for their sport. --William Shakespeare Few modern novels have the sting of Nobel Prize winner William Golding's "Lord of the Flies." This fable of civilization battling primitivism on an island of castaway boys has ruthless force, an icy lyricism, cut-glass clarity. It's also ideal movie material, and Peter Brook's fine 1963 film tapped only part of its potential. But the new "Lord of the Flies" (citywide) gets almost none.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1985 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
The clash of complex rights and wrongs behind the violence in 1980 between Vietnamese refugees-turned-fishermen and long-established Texas shrimpers is the background for Louis Malle's simplistic "Alamo Bay" (at the Coronet). Malle has called "Alamo Bay" his "American 'Lacombe, Lucien': Both are films about how private behavior is twisted around by political backgrounds."
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
For more than an hour, Hunter S. Thompson has been calmly and cogently presenting his views on national politics between bites of his lunch. So calmly, in fact, that he doesn't even bother to harass the waitress when she informs him that there is no more tuna salad. Suddenly, he stops in mid-sentence and emits a blood-curdling cry. He has detected a strand of hair on the lip of his drinking glass and cannot continue.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|