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Ross Rebagliati

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February 14, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Canadian forward Eric Lindros said he encountered Ross Rebagliati, the Canadian snowboarder whose gold medal was temporarily revoked after he tested positive for marijuana, at the Olympic village and offered congratulations that Rebagliati's medal had been returned. "I just said it was great that you got it back and it was unfortunate that you had to go through all that," Lindros said.
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SPORTS
February 21, 1998
Cathy Skubik of Harbor Magnet school in San Pedro asked her fifth-grade class to write letters to The Times about whether Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati should have lost his gold medal after testing positive for marijuana. Here are some of their efforts: One of the reasons that I think he should get the medal is because marijuana does not help him in sports. It does not make him stronger like steroids. It does not push him forward, it holds him back and makes him weaker. The next reason is that he worked for this and deserves it. They should take the urine test before they even accept them in the Olympics.
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SPORTS
February 21, 1998
Cathy Skubik of Harbor Magnet school in San Pedro asked her fifth-grade class to write letters to The Times about whether Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati should have lost his gold medal after testing positive for marijuana. Here are some of their efforts: One of the reasons that I think he should get the medal is because marijuana does not help him in sports. It does not make him stronger like steroids. It does not push him forward, it holds him back and makes him weaker. The next reason is that he worked for this and deserves it. They should take the urine test before they even accept them in the Olympics.
SPORTS
February 18, 1998 | Associated Press
As usual, many of the more than 30 bobsled teams competing in the Olympics sport some distinctive paint jobs. None is more distinctive than that of the Virgin Islands. The four-man sled is painted a brilliant green and black, and looks like a giant lizard, eerie eyes and all on the front. And say this for the crew. They know where to get the job done. "We were going to get it painted in Park City [Utah]," driver Zachary Zoller said. "Thank God we didn't go there.
SPORTS
February 12, 1998 | Reuters
Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati underwent a police grilling about drug use while waiting to hear whether a tribunal would let him keep his sport's first-ever Olympic gold. Rebagliati was disqualified and told to hand back his medal on Tuesday after urine samples taken following Sunday's giant slalom showed traces of marijuana. His team immediately appealed against the International Olympic Committee ruling, saying he had not smoked a joint in 10 months.
SPORTS
February 8, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snowboarding's first ride in the Winter Olympics turned into a wild one Sunday, when fog rolled over Mt. Yakebitai and rendered even the experts helpless in predicting the finish. Canada's Ross Rebagliati earned the distinction as the sport's first gold medalist, winning the men's giant slalom with a two-run combined time of 2 minutes 03.96 seconds. Thomas Prugger of Austria finished two-hundredths of a second behind in second place in 2:03.98. Ueli Kestenholz of Switzerland was third in 2:04.
SPORTS
February 11, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marijuana found in his blood system, an athlete from Canada was stripped of his gold medal and sent home Tuesday from the Winter Olympics. Canadian Olympic Committee officials planned to appeal the disqualification of Ross Rebagliati, 26, of Whistler, Canada, who took first place Sunday in men's giant slalom snowboarding. The COC was notified that metabolized marijuana was detected in an "A" blood sample, then confirmed by a "B" sample that found 17.
SPORTS
February 18, 1998 | Associated Press
As usual, many of the more than 30 bobsled teams competing in the Olympics sport some distinctive paint jobs. None is more distinctive than that of the Virgin Islands. The four-man sled is painted a brilliant green and black, and looks like a giant lizard, eerie eyes and all on the front. And say this for the crew. They know where to get the job done. "We were going to get it painted in Park City [Utah]," driver Zachary Zoller said. "Thank God we didn't go there.
SPORTS
February 13, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
"Grandpa Ross," a child may say to Ross Rebagliati some day in the 21st century, looking at a keepsake in a 1998 Winter Olympic trophy case, "how did you get your gold medal?" "Second-hand smoke." In a funny spin on President Clinton's classic denial, a 26-year-old Canadian gets to be an Olympic gold medalist for life, because he inhaled but didn't smoke. At least, that's how Rebagliati explained testing positive for marijuana here. Other people smoked. All he did was breathe.
SPORTS
February 8, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
Athletes are always letting something "sink in." They never seem to be able to tell you how something feels, because it "hasn't sunk in" yet. Ross Rebagliati is refreshing. A gold medalist from Canada in men's snowboarding giant slalom, Rebagliati said, "I'm just gonna let it sink in for the next few weeks, maybe a few years, maybe it'll never sink in, I don't know."
SPORTS
February 14, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Canadian forward Eric Lindros said he encountered Ross Rebagliati, the Canadian snowboarder whose gold medal was temporarily revoked after he tested positive for marijuana, at the Olympic village and offered congratulations that Rebagliati's medal had been returned. "I just said it was great that you got it back and it was unfortunate that you had to go through all that," Lindros said.
SPORTS
February 13, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
"Grandpa Ross," a child may say to Ross Rebagliati some day in the 21st century, looking at a keepsake in a 1998 Winter Olympic trophy case, "how did you get your gold medal?" "Second-hand smoke." In a funny spin on President Clinton's classic denial, a 26-year-old Canadian gets to be an Olympic gold medalist for life, because he inhaled but didn't smoke. At least, that's how Rebagliati explained testing positive for marijuana here. Other people smoked. All he did was breathe.
SPORTS
February 12, 1998 | Reuters
Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati underwent a police grilling about drug use while waiting to hear whether a tribunal would let him keep his sport's first-ever Olympic gold. Rebagliati was disqualified and told to hand back his medal on Tuesday after urine samples taken following Sunday's giant slalom showed traces of marijuana. His team immediately appealed against the International Olympic Committee ruling, saying he had not smoked a joint in 10 months.
SPORTS
February 11, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marijuana found in his blood system, an athlete from Canada was stripped of his gold medal and sent home Tuesday from the Winter Olympics. Canadian Olympic Committee officials planned to appeal the disqualification of Ross Rebagliati, 26, of Whistler, Canada, who took first place Sunday in men's giant slalom snowboarding. The COC was notified that metabolized marijuana was detected in an "A" blood sample, then confirmed by a "B" sample that found 17.
SPORTS
February 8, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snowboarding's first ride in the Winter Olympics turned into a wild one Sunday, when fog rolled over Mt. Yakebitai and rendered even the experts helpless in predicting the finish. Canada's Ross Rebagliati earned the distinction as the sport's first gold medalist, winning the men's giant slalom with a two-run combined time of 2 minutes 03.96 seconds. Thomas Prugger of Austria finished two-hundredths of a second behind in second place in 2:03.98. Ueli Kestenholz of Switzerland was third in 2:04.
SPORTS
February 14, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
Dr. Don Catlin, chief of the UCLA laboratory that served as the official drug-testing center for the 1984 Summer Olympics, is a member of the IOC medical commission and in Nagano for the Games. Less than a week after arriving here came the marijuana controversy after Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati, who was stripped of his giant-slalom gold medal by the IOC after testing positive. Rebagliati had his medal reinstated Thursday night.
SPORTS
February 16, 1998 | MIKE KUPPER
Caught off guard by the Ross Rebagliati-marijuana controversy, the IOC will look into use of the drug by Olympic athletes, hoping to avoid future misunderstandings and preserve "fundamental values." Rebagliati, the Canadian snowboard champion, lost his gold medal temporarily, after testing positive for marijuana, then got it back after winning an appeal on the ground that pot was not among the drugs specifically forbidden in the Olympics.
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