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Ross Wright

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September 22, 2003 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
By day a mild-mannered musician and film composer, when Ross Wright gets anywhere near a podium, voila!, he becomes Elvis Schoenberg, fearlessly jumping boundaries of genre and taste in a single leap. Not merely content to perform shotgun marriages between the likes of Wagner and Nancy Sinatra, Mussorgsky and Santana, etc., Wright (er, Elvis) took on a more ambitious task Friday night at the Ford Amphitheatre -- a "book musical" of a sort called "Symphony of the Absurd!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2003 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
By day a mild-mannered musician and film composer, when Ross Wright gets anywhere near a podium, voila!, he becomes Elvis Schoenberg, fearlessly jumping boundaries of genre and taste in a single leap. Not merely content to perform shotgun marriages between the likes of Wagner and Nancy Sinatra, Mussorgsky and Santana, etc., Wright (er, Elvis) took on a more ambitious task Friday night at the Ford Amphitheatre -- a "book musical" of a sort called "Symphony of the Absurd!"
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NEWS
January 7, 1988 | PAMELA MARIN, For The Times
The young and the businesslike gathered at South Coast Plaza's Crystal Court on Thursday to bid a formal how-do to the new year. Well-dressed (black ties and slinky gowns) and well-behaved (waiting peacefully in hourlong lines to get their pictures taken), more than 800 members and guests of the Center 500--a support group for the Orange County Performing Arts Center--filled the tony shopping mall for "A Classic Evening of Rhythm and Blues."
SPORTS
October 13, 1986 | Associated Press
The Detroit Lions haven't had a breakaway threat since the career-ending injury to Billy Sims. Rookie Garry James wants to remedy that. James ran for 140 yards in 20 carries in Sunday's 21-14 victory over the winless Green Bay Packers, the first Detroit running back to gain that many yards in a game since Sims did it in 1984. "We never had a guy the last three years who could do that," said veteran fullback James Jones, who added 99 yards in 29 carries. "He's got the speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Many if not most of America's representative artists have come out of the Midwest, some of our finest comedians among them. (Johnny Carson is from Nebraska and Merle Kessler, a.k.a. Ian Shoales, grew up in Minnesota, where Garrison Keillor remains firmly and lyrically entrenched.) The comedian may be the Midwest's premiere ambassador to the rest of the country. Bill Frenzer is among that company. At 37, he's had at least a couple of decades of tilting lances at America's forms of sentimentality.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Ross WRIGHT, a.k.a. Elvis Schoenberg, is stirring the pot. But though his homemade spaghetti sauce, its pungent aroma wafting through the air, may be assaulting olfactory senses, it's the sound of 20-odd musicians tuning up -- violins, trumpets, woodwinds, percussion, electric guitars and keyboard -- that nearly blows the roof off his tiny Highland Park home.
SPORTS
June 6, 1993 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chad Wright tees it up Monday morning in the Southern California Golf Assn. high school golf tournament at Stockdale Country Club in Bakersfield, he will find himself the favorite despite coming off a runner-up finish in the Southern Section tournament. Wright, a senior from Buena High, placed second last month in the Southern Section individual golf championships at Canyon Country Club in Palm Springs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth Ross, the founder of the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs who spearheaded the restoration of Hollyhock House by Frank Lloyd Wright and the preservation of the Watts Towers by Simon Rodia, died Monday, according to his son, Murray Ross. He was 95. Ross, who also helped establish the Municipal Art Gallery and the Junior Arts Center that are part of the Hollyhock House complex in Barnsdall Park, died of natural causes at Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2008 | F. Kathleen Foley; Charlotte Stoudt; Philip Brandes
It's been two decades since David Henry Hwang's Tony-winning "M. Butterfly" first hit Broadway. Hwang based his drama on the true-life case in which a French diplomat passed state secrets to his Chinese lover, actually a man in drag, a fact that escaped the diplomat's notice over a 20-year affair. In his production at the sub-99-seat Chandler Studio Theatre, director Derek Charles Livingston takes on the formidable task of reducing the play's operatic sweep to a tiny stage.
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