Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRosso Jose Serrano
IN THE NEWS

Rosso Jose Serrano

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed in a pale blue sport coat instead of his usual olive green uniform, Gen. Rosso Jose Serrano, Colombia's top police officer, stepped out of his helicopter a few yards from the hangar where three U.S.-donated Black Hawks were undergoing the manufacturer's final inspection. They were the last of six helicopters promised in 1998, when the Colombian National Police became the first law enforcement agency in the world to fly the military helicopters. Serrano was here to thank the U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed in a pale blue sport coat instead of his usual olive green uniform, Gen. Rosso Jose Serrano, Colombia's top police officer, stepped out of his helicopter a few yards from the hangar where three U.S.-donated Black Hawks were undergoing the manufacturer's final inspection. They were the last of six helicopters promised in 1998, when the Colombian National Police became the first law enforcement agency in the world to fly the military helicopters. Serrano was here to thank the U.S.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2000
Your article about Gen. Rosso Jose Serrano ("To Colombians, He Is the War on Drugs," May 3) is a joke. We are giving these Colombian crooks $1.3 billion more of our taxpayer money; they are just laughing at us. When will people realize that Colombia is just a scam? FRANK ALESSI West Los Angeles
NEWS
June 8, 1998 | Reuters
The government claimed a major strike against drug gangs Sunday with the arrest of a man it characterized as the nation's last billionaire cocaine merchant still at large. Alberto Orlandez Gamboa, 42, was seized late Saturday in the port of Barranquilla. National Police Chief Gen. Rosso Jose Serrano said Orlandez is the reputed chief of the Coast drug cartel. He was wanted on numerous charges, including murder.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Colombia's top police official and a key U.S. ally in the war on drugs announced that he is resigning. Five years after dismantling the Cali cocaine cartel, Gen. Rosso Jose Serrano said his nation's battle against drugs, kidnapping and guerrilla violence has claimed too many lives. "I've been to so many police officers' funerals I can't bear another," he said. Nearly 2,000 police have died since 1994, the year Serrano became national police chief.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | Associated Press
Fighting raged all day Sunday in a remote southeastern town after about 800 leftist rebels attacked a police base, killing at least four officers, wounding nine and cutting off communications. The guerrillas of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia rained homemade missiles on the police garrison in Mitu, capital of Vaupes state, where 120 officers were stationed, Gen. Rosso Jose Serrano told a news conference. The same type of missiles were used in an Aug.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A huge cache of drug money linked to a Cali cartel kingpin may provide the hardest evidence yet for long-standing U.S. charges that drug lords are trafficking narcotics from inside Colombia's prisons. Nearly $5 million in suspected cocaine cash was discovered by police Tuesday in a raid on a house in the southwestern city of Cali, most of it in $100 and $50 bills sealed in wrappers marked "Reserva Federal Bank," an apparent reference to the U.S. Federal Reserve.
NEWS
August 11, 1997 | From Reuters
One of Colombia's top alleged heroin traffickers was captured in the capital, police said Sunday, in the first arrest by a newly created joint U.S.-Colombian drug unit. Waldo Simeon Vargas has three outstanding arrest warrants against him in Colombia and seven in neighboring Peru on drug-trafficking and illicit-enrichment charges, National Police Chief Rosso Jose Serrano told reporters.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A powerful car bomb rocked a residential district in the northwestern city of Medellin early Monday, killing a woman and injuring at least 48 people, police said. About 120 pounds of dynamite packed into a minibus blew up outside the house of Juan Gomez Martinez, a regional newspaper executive and former provincial governor. The Colombian government said it suspected drug cartels were behind the blast. President Ernesto Samper vowed not to bow to terrorist violence from drug traffickers.
OPINION
May 30, 2002
While narco-guerrillas and paramilitary armies burned voting materials in distant rural areas, millions of Colombians lined up in scorching heat and soaking rain Sunday to reaffirm their commitment to democracy by electing a new president. Defying violent intimidation, the people showed their resilience.
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | RUTH MORRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anti-narcotics police dismantled a major heroin smuggling ring Wednesday in a predawn sweep that spanned four cities and led to the capture of 46 alleged drug traffickers, law enforcement authorities said. The raid netted Nicolas Urquijo Gaviria, the suspected leader of the ring and a cousin of the late drug lord Pablo Escobar, police said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|