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Rotavirus

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NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The rotavirus vaccine introduced in Mexico in 2007 still appears to be preventing diarrhea-related deaths in children, despite speculation that years later the vaccine may not be as effective. In a letter released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers report that the vaccine still seems to be successful in reducing mortality rates among children. They compared diarrhea-related deaths during the three years after the vaccine was introduced with death rates during rotavirus seasons from 2003 to 2006.
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SCIENCE
August 27, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
The infants who get the rotavirus vaccine aren't the only ones who benefit. New research shows that older children and even adults were less likely to be hospitalized with the gastrointestinal virus after the vaccine was introduced in the U.S. in 2006. Rotavirus causes "severe watery diarrhea, often with vomiting, fever, and abdominal pain," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Before the RotaTeq and Rotarix vaccines came on the market, nearly all U.S. children became infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday.
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SCIENCE
January 28, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Vaccines that protect against severe disease and death from rotavirus infections in the United States and other developed countries work nearly as well in developing countries and should be widely employed there, researchers report today in two papers in the New England Journal of Medicine. Health authorities now have "another powerful weapon" to combat the disease, Dr. Mathuram Santosham of Johns Hopkins University wrote in an editorial accompanying the studies. Widespread use of the vaccines could save more than 2 million lives over the next decade, he said.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The rotavirus vaccine has worked -- keeping a significant number of children out of the hospital for treatment of diarrhea, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. U.S. health officials began recommending routine vaccination of children against the virus -- which causes watery diarrhea and can lead to dehydration -- in February 2006.  Before the vaccine became routine, rotavirus diarrhea caused about 400,000 physician visits; 200,000 emergency department visits; 55,000 hospitalizations and 20 to 60 deaths each year among children under 5 in the United States.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2004
"After Decades, Developing World Is Still Waiting for a Vital Vaccine" (Sept. 5) brought an important global health issue to light. Rotavirus, a disease that kills more than 500,000 children a year in the developing world, can be prevented with a vaccine. Although the profit motive has been a principal driver of product development, the challenge now is to make these new vaccines accessible to the children in poor countries where the need is greatest. The global vaccine community has risen to this challenge by forging and funding a new type of partnership between the public and private sectors to accelerate the introduction of rotavirus vaccines in the poorest countries of the world.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Andrew Zajac
The federal "vaccines court" ruled Friday in three separate cases that the mercury-containing preservative thimerosal does not cause autism, a finding that supports the broad scientific consensus on the matter but that greatly disappointed parents who are convinced that their child's illness was caused by vaccines. The court had ruled 13 months ago that a combination of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, commonly known as the MMR vaccine, and thimerosal does not cause the disorder, so the new ruling may finally close the bulk of litigation on the matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Vaccine Wars," Tuesday's edition of the PBS documentary series " Frontline," concerns the decision of a growing number of parents not to vaccinate their children — primarily out of fear that the vaccines, of which there are more today than when your critic was a boy, can cause autism and other neurological disorders — and the public-health officials who find that trend alarming and dangerous: Falling rates of vaccination can reopen the...
HEALTH
March 16, 1998 | SHARI ROAN
At least it's not a shot. Still, another vaccine is likely to be added to the already burgeoning childhood vaccine lineup. Recently, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention committee voted to recommend that the first vaccine for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis be used routinely in all full-term infants. Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe, and sometimes fatal, diarrhea in children. Licensure of the vaccine is still under review by the Food and Drug Administration.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
WASHINGTON, D.C. A vaccine that protects infants from rotavirus, which causes diarrhea and dehydration and leads to hundreds of thousands of deaths a year in developing countries, has received federal approval. RotaTeq, made by Merck & Co., prevented at least 98% of severe cases of gastroenteritis, or intestinal inflammation, in medical trials, the Food and Drug Administration said in announcing its approval of the medication.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The rotavirus vaccine has worked -- keeping a significant number of children out of the hospital for treatment of diarrhea, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. U.S. health officials began recommending routine vaccination of children against the virus -- which causes watery diarrhea and can lead to dehydration -- in February 2006.  Before the vaccine became routine, rotavirus diarrhea caused about 400,000 physician visits; 200,000 emergency department visits; 55,000 hospitalizations and 20 to 60 deaths each year among children under 5 in the United States.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The rotavirus vaccine introduced in Mexico in 2007 still appears to be preventing diarrhea-related deaths in children, despite speculation that years later the vaccine may not be as effective. In a letter released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers report that the vaccine still seems to be successful in reducing mortality rates among children. They compared diarrhea-related deaths during the three years after the vaccine was introduced with death rates during rotavirus seasons from 2003 to 2006.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Vaccine Wars," Tuesday's edition of the PBS documentary series " Frontline," concerns the decision of a growing number of parents not to vaccinate their children — primarily out of fear that the vaccines, of which there are more today than when your critic was a boy, can cause autism and other neurological disorders — and the public-health officials who find that trend alarming and dangerous: Falling rates of vaccination can reopen the...
SCIENCE
March 23, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday warned doctors and parents against using the Rotarix rotavirus vaccine until further testing can confirm that it is safe. The warning follows an academic research group's discovery -- subsequently confirmed by the FDA and Rotarix manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline -- that the vaccine contains a pig virus called porcine circovirus 1, or PCV1. The virus is not known to cause illness in humans, and no adverse effects have been observed in children vaccinated with Rotarix, but the agency decided to err on the side of caution with the warning until more information can be obtained.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Andrew Zajac
The federal "vaccines court" ruled Friday in three separate cases that the mercury-containing preservative thimerosal does not cause autism, a finding that supports the broad scientific consensus on the matter but that greatly disappointed parents who are convinced that their child's illness was caused by vaccines. The court had ruled 13 months ago that a combination of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, commonly known as the MMR vaccine, and thimerosal does not cause the disorder, so the new ruling may finally close the bulk of litigation on the matter.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Vaccines that protect against severe disease and death from rotavirus infections in the United States and other developed countries work nearly as well in developing countries and should be widely employed there, researchers report today in two papers in the New England Journal of Medicine. Health authorities now have "another powerful weapon" to combat the disease, Dr. Mathuram Santosham of Johns Hopkins University wrote in an editorial accompanying the studies. Widespread use of the vaccines could save more than 2 million lives over the next decade, he said.
SCIENCE
June 26, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A rotavirus vaccine approved in 2006 is having a significant impact in the United States, delaying the onset of the rotavirus season by three months and reducing its severity by about half, federal officials said Wednesday.
SCIENCE
August 27, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
The infants who get the rotavirus vaccine aren't the only ones who benefit. New research shows that older children and even adults were less likely to be hospitalized with the gastrointestinal virus after the vaccine was introduced in the U.S. in 2006. Rotavirus causes "severe watery diarrhea, often with vomiting, fever, and abdominal pain," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Before the RotaTeq and Rotarix vaccines came on the market, nearly all U.S. children became infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
WASHINGTON, D.C. A vaccine that protects infants from rotavirus, which causes diarrhea and dehydration and leads to hundreds of thousands of deaths a year in developing countries, has received federal approval. RotaTeq, made by Merck & Co., prevented at least 98% of severe cases of gastroenteritis, or intestinal inflammation, in medical trials, the Food and Drug Administration said in announcing its approval of the medication.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2004
"After Decades, Developing World Is Still Waiting for a Vital Vaccine" (Sept. 5) brought an important global health issue to light. Rotavirus, a disease that kills more than 500,000 children a year in the developing world, can be prevented with a vaccine. Although the profit motive has been a principal driver of product development, the challenge now is to make these new vaccines accessible to the children in poor countries where the need is greatest. The global vaccine community has risen to this challenge by forging and funding a new type of partnership between the public and private sectors to accelerate the introduction of rotavirus vaccines in the poorest countries of the world.
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