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SPORTS
July 12, 1987 | Gene Wojciechowki
Dear Mom and Dad, Thanks so much for the recent care package. The fudge was wonderful, as was the Spam and broccoli dip. I must ask, however, that you do not include any more baseball box scores and game summaries. The attendants here at the Smithers Rotisserie League Rehabilitation Center react unkindly. Gunther (we call him "The Wart Hog from Hell") is especially annoyed. Let's face it, I needed help. I was up to three leagues a week. I read the Baseball Encylopedia cover to cover--for fun.
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NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
ANTHONY BOURDAIN: Chef-TV-personality Anthony Bourdain embarks on his multinational (the U.S. and Canada) speaking tour, dubbed "Guts and Glory," stopping on the West Coast after the holidays. Tickets go on sale Friday morning for his Los Angeles appearance with Roy Choi on April 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Pantages Theater. Prices start at $35, available online at BroadwayLA.org , by phone at (800) 982-2787, or in person at the Pantages Box Office (open daily at 10 a.m.). For more information: AnthonyBourdainonTour.com .  BIERBEISL, OFF THE MENU: BierBeisl chef Bernhard Mairinger, who also has taken on the role of pastry chef, is making an off-the-menu dessert that you'll have to ask for by describing it (it doesn't have a name)
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FOOD
August 27, 2008 | Judith Kane Jeanson, Special to The Times
HERE'S THE experience I'm always on the prowl for: a simple, golden, tender rotisserie chicken, bursting with juice, lifted off its skewer when it's just cooked and placed in my hands. I run home and pull apart the warm, delicate meat with my bare fingers. A bite of baguette, a dab of mayo or a drop of melted butter. Heaven. The magic of this classic spit-roasted bird is in its simplicity -- a basic seasoning, a well-timed turn on a skewer and an immediate transfer of the just-finished bird to the customer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Robert Sklar, a film scholar known for bringing the insights of the social historian to understanding the history of American film, has died. He was 74. Sklar, who also was one of the original Rotisserie League fantasy baseball "owners" in the 1980s, died in Barcelona, Spain, July 2 after suffering head injuries in a bicycling accident, said Richard Allen, professor and chair of cinema studies at New York University. A professor in the department of cinema studies at New York University from 1977 until his retirement in 2009, Sklar was the author of books that included "City Boys: Cagney, Bogart, Garfield" (1992)
MAGAZINE
June 4, 1989 | JOAN DRAKE, Joan Drake is a Times staff writer.
Now foods that require longer, slower cooking can move outdoors. The newest patio "entertainment centers" serve as mini-kitchens and feature rotisseries, covered grills and indirect heat (a method in which meat or poultry is roasted, over a drip pan, by heat sources on either side). Some elaborate setups even have sinks and refrigerators. One of the benefits of these sophisticated cooking centers is that, weather permitting, virtually all food preparation can move to the back yard. Best of all, the new units let you cook a roast--a long, hot job in a regular oven--without raising the temperature in the house.
SPORTS
November 11, 1989
If Allan Malamud finds personal stories about golf and rotisserie leagues boring, he should read a column whose most exciting item concerned the rumor that Penn State was planning to change the design on its football helmets. CLAIR DOWNEY, Bellflower
SPORTS
May 15, 1993
I am not a Dodger fan, but I am a baseball fan. What has happened to the Dodgers over the last two years is a travesty. The bad trades, incredible amounts of money spent on players who don't produce, and no end in sight. I have a solution. Fire Fred Claire and hire me to run the Dodgers. Over the last five years, my rotisserie team has finished in first place twice, second place once, third once, and in the second division only one time. At least I know what I am doing. KEVIN KLEIN Phillips Ranch
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
ANTHONY BOURDAIN: Chef-TV-personality Anthony Bourdain embarks on his multinational (the U.S. and Canada) speaking tour, dubbed "Guts and Glory," stopping on the West Coast after the holidays. Tickets go on sale Friday morning for his Los Angeles appearance with Roy Choi on April 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Pantages Theater. Prices start at $35, available online at BroadwayLA.org , by phone at (800) 982-2787, or in person at the Pantages Box Office (open daily at 10 a.m.). For more information: AnthonyBourdainonTour.com .  BIERBEISL, OFF THE MENU: BierBeisl chef Bernhard Mairinger, who also has taken on the role of pastry chef, is making an off-the-menu dessert that you'll have to ask for by describing it (it doesn't have a name)
SPORTS
July 25, 1998
I love it when my 10-year-old son joins me in the TV room to watch a ballgame. When it's the Dodgers, it's pure joy. Vin Scully can call a game and wax poetic like no other. Can you imagine some crusty ex-ballplayer sitting in with Vin, making insidious small talk between pitches? When I occasionally watch the Angels (usually for rotisserie reasons), my son is apt to hear something like: "If he makes pitches like that, I promise you, he better git 'em out" or "That ball run away on him good."
BUSINESS
May 19, 1989 | David Nelson
Vic's opened in late 1986 as one of the most ambitious restaurants in La Jolla. It was difficult to dislike Vic's style, which took a grand point of view and encompassed a formal decor, first-class service and a cuisine that emphasized large portions of carefully cooked, top-quality foods. All this came at a price, however, one so steep that Vic's deep booths were empty more often than not. Changes were made, including the departure of chef Jim Hill and a scaling back of the menu that allowed the restaurant to decrease prices considerably.
FOOD
May 19, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear SOS: We recently dined at Tyler Florence's new Rotisserie & Wine in Napa. The cornbread was crisp on the outside and almost custard-like in the middle. It's not like any of his cornbread recipes online. Can you get it for me? Jim Brott Huntington Beach Dear Jim: Delicately crisp on the outside but light and oh-so-fluffy on the inside, these aren't your standard cornbread rolls. Rotisserie & Wine's cornsticks use a dough similar to choux paste, giving them a soufflé-like rise as they bake, richly golden and only lightly sweet.
HOME & GARDEN
October 5, 2010 | Lauren Beale
Retired fashion designer Geary Roark has listed his Studio City home at $1,099,000. The Robert Byrd-designed storybook ranch, built in 1953, has hand-hewn beam ceilings, built-in cabinets and a two-sided brick wall with a fireplace in the living room and a built-in barbecue with a rotisserie in the dining room. There are three bedrooms and 2 1/2 bathrooms in 1,894 square feet. Roark grew up in Tennessee, and his father was a building contractor. "I was really attracted to the craftsmanship in the house," he said, describing it as having "lots of wood and lots of character."
FOOD
August 27, 2008 | Judith Kane Jeanson, Special to The Times
HERE'S THE experience I'm always on the prowl for: a simple, golden, tender rotisserie chicken, bursting with juice, lifted off its skewer when it's just cooked and placed in my hands. I run home and pull apart the warm, delicate meat with my bare fingers. A bite of baguette, a dab of mayo or a drop of melted butter. Heaven. The magic of this classic spit-roasted bird is in its simplicity -- a basic seasoning, a well-timed turn on a skewer and an immediate transfer of the just-finished bird to the customer.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2006 | Kristen Wyatt, Associated Press
Has rotisserie chicken, once the darling of the grocery store, lost its sizzle? The ready-cooked birds flew off grocers' shelves in the 1990s, but sales have begun leveling off, industry estimates show. A growing number of grocers worry that customers are getting a little bored of the chickens, even in lemon pepper or barbecue flavors, and in response they are throwing new meats on the skewer. Coming soon: rotisserie pork loins and beef.
FOOD
July 16, 2003 | Charles Perry, Times Staff Writer
Welcome to the Wednesday Roastdown! This is the middleweight indoor rotisserie elimination, and we're down to two contenders. Longtime favorite Faberware has retired, leaving the field to the George Jr. Rotisserie and the Jr. Showtime Rotisserie & BBQ Oven. These boys don't do things fancy-style. Neither has a temperature control -- the only setting you can adjust is the cooking time, up to three hours. And they're pretty evenly matched. Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Tom SHADYAC has directed three consecutive $100-million-plus comedy hits. His latest film, "Bruce Almighty," which made an estimated $86.4 million this weekend, will easily be his fourth. But to hear his critics tell it, Shadyac is right up there with Saddam and Osama as a scourge of Western civilization. The Washington Post's Stephen Hunter didn't mince words: "If the road to hell is paved with self-deluding good intentions, then the makers of the appalling Jim Carrey comedy 'Bruce Almighty' are headed to the devil's rotisserie for an eternity as gyros."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1994 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES and We're at the Century City Marketplace food court waiting for our BG souffles to cook
Nancy Reagan is said to eat there weekly. In these tight-belt times, when the city's most high-powered restaurants have created casual, more affordable venues, Bistro Garden has followed suit with two options: BG to Go, a take-out restaurant adjacent to the Studio City Bistro Garden, and this Century City food stall. Twenty minutes, says the woman at the BG Souffle counter. We buy drinks, snag a table. Next to us a woman eats stew from a round loaf of bread.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Tom SHADYAC has directed three consecutive $100-million-plus comedy hits. His latest film, "Bruce Almighty," which made an estimated $86.4 million this weekend, will easily be his fourth. But to hear his critics tell it, Shadyac is right up there with Saddam and Osama as a scourge of Western civilization. The Washington Post's Stephen Hunter didn't mince words: "If the road to hell is paved with self-deluding good intentions, then the makers of the appalling Jim Carrey comedy 'Bruce Almighty' are headed to the devil's rotisserie for an eternity as gyros."
SPORTS
August 31, 2000 | T.J. SIMERS
Just between you and me, and I'll deny it if it's repeated, I'm feeling the pressure from the boss. Yeah, I know it has been there from day one--you think my kid wanted to go to Notre Dame? I can only thank the good heavens that Sports Editor Bill Dwyre didn't go to UCLA. It's kind of understood there are only two ways to get a job around here: Swear allegiance to the Irish or talk tennis.
HOME & GARDEN
October 9, 1999 | RALPH KOVEL and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cooking on an open hearth requires a special skill. Many tools used in the 18th and early 19th centuries to simplify cooking over a fire are now almost forgotten. Every well-equipped kitchen had a spit or hook that was used to roast meat or fowl. Heavy, twisted cords were hung from a hook and secured to a pole inside the chimney to hold the food over the fire. The string would untwist and then twist again, turning the meat.
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