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Rotisserie Baseball

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SPORTS
April 15, 1989 | Gene Wojciechowski
They have become a phenomenon. A sickness. An obsession. Rotisserie baseball leagues: Can't live with 'em, can't live without 'em. Have you ever been cornered at, say, a dinner party by a guy with bad breath, a morsel of cheese dip dangling from his chin, and all he wants to talk about are his split-times for a 10K race he ran, or how he really thinks a Crescent wrench is the most valuable tool in a tool box? Now take that conversation, multiply the boredom by 1,000, and that's what it is like to be an outsider in the middle of a Rotisserie league talk.
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BOOKS
April 2, 2006 | Nick Owchar;Kristina Lindgren
"Fantasyland: A Season on Baseball's Lunatic Fringe" by Sam Walker (Viking: 354 pp., $25.95) A sports columnist for the Wall Street Journal, Walker figured he'd have the inside edge when he joined a rotisserie baseball league. Fat chance. "Roto" baseball is played by some 5 million fanatics who think they'd be better managers than the real ones -- they pay fees to draft ideal rosters and use player stats as their dream teams face off on paper.
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SPORTS
April 28, 1991 | MARK POTTS, WASHINGTON POST; (Washington Post financial reporter Mark Potts has been playing Rotisserie for seven years. He won for the first time last season.)
When Bo Jackson was released by the Kansas City Royals last month after suffering a career-threatening hip injury, a large group of peculiarly crazed sports fans was plunged into mourning. They weren't members of the Royals fan club. Rather, the tens of thousands whose day was ruined by the "Bo Goes" headlines were his other "owners": the budding George Steinbrenners who are participants in Rotisserie, or fantasy, baseball leagues.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Murderers' Row" is just the thing for late summer and early fall, the time of year in America when baseball nostalgia ripens sweetly. The book takes its name from the 1927 Yankees' lineup of power hitters, but the title is not metaphoric. It is factually descriptive. Otto Penzler, the proprietor of the Mysterious Bookshop in New York, has gathered 14 baseball mysteries by contemporary writers of mystery and suspense, and the result is satisfying, mostly.
BOOKS
April 2, 2006 | Nick Owchar;Kristina Lindgren
"Fantasyland: A Season on Baseball's Lunatic Fringe" by Sam Walker (Viking: 354 pp., $25.95) A sports columnist for the Wall Street Journal, Walker figured he'd have the inside edge when he joined a rotisserie baseball league. Fat chance. "Roto" baseball is played by some 5 million fanatics who think they'd be better managers than the real ones -- they pay fees to draft ideal rosters and use player stats as their dream teams face off on paper.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | NICOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Rose lives in a world in which he can trade speedy second baseman Chuck Knoblauch for veteran pitcher Roger Clemens. He can send faxes to his fellow owners dictating the terms of free agency. He can bench Jose Canseco. But on Monday, Rose was powerless. His world--the fantasy world of rotisserie baseball--was shattered.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Murderers' Row" is just the thing for late summer and early fall, the time of year in America when baseball nostalgia ripens sweetly. The book takes its name from the 1927 Yankees' lineup of power hitters, but the title is not metaphoric. It is factually descriptive. Otto Penzler, the proprietor of the Mysterious Bookshop in New York, has gathered 14 baseball mysteries by contemporary writers of mystery and suspense, and the result is satisfying, mostly.
SPORTS
April 28, 1991 | MARK POTTS, WASHINGTON POST
Just about every baseball fan thinks he or she can do a better job picking players than the general manager of any major-league team. But Rotisserie or fantasy-league players know it isn't as easy as it looks. Perhaps the most crucial part of the Rotisserie season is its beginning -- the auction or draft of players in which participants fill their 23-player rosters. Strategies vary, but here are a few draft-day rules of thumb for fantasy-baseball general managers.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
Before he put on his robe or read a legal brief--even before he left for the courthouse--the presiding justice of the California appellate court division in Santa Ana grabbed the sports page every morning to see how his team was doing. There was a time when John K. Trotter Jr., of Division 3 of the 4th District Court of Appeal, would have been looking for the Dodgers' or Angels' box scores.
SPORTS
July 14, 1991 | STEVE MARCUS, NEWSDAY
Baseball has indeed expanded beyond the American and National League to the Fantasy League. The stadium of the mind is embodied in the burgeoning Rotisserie League, where every fan can run his own team. Organized 11 years ago by a small group of fans and writers, an estimated 2 million persons are playing in this field of schemes.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2000 | GARY RUBIN
There are a number of ways to play fantasy baseball, from the simple (just counting home runs, for example) to the complex. Rotisserie is the most popular of the fantasy games. There are eight categories (four hitting, four pitching) in which players accumulate statistics: composite batting average, total home runs, total runs batted in, stolen bases, pitching victories, total saves, earned run average and WHIP (walks and hits given up, divided by innings pitched).
BUSINESS
March 30, 2000 | GARY RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dodger General Manager Kevin Malone and his counterpart on the Angels, Bill Stoneman, have spent most of the spring assessing their teams, making crucial decisions on the makeup of their 25-man rosters that will open the season next week. But other would-be GMs also are hard at work--the tens of thousands of fantasy "owners" in the Southland and across the country who participate in the ever-growing pastime of fantasy or rotisserie baseball.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | NICOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Rose lives in a world in which he can trade speedy second baseman Chuck Knoblauch for veteran pitcher Roger Clemens. He can send faxes to his fellow owners dictating the terms of free agency. He can bench Jose Canseco. But on Monday, Rose was powerless. His world--the fantasy world of rotisserie baseball--was shattered.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | NICOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Rose lives in a world in which he can trade speedy second baseman Chuck Knoblauch for veteran pitcher Roger Clemens. He can send faxes to his fellow owners dictating the terms of free agency. He can bench Jose Canseco. But on Monday, Rose was powerless. His world--the fantasy world of rotisserie baseball--was shattered.
SPORTS
July 14, 1991 | STEVE MARCUS, NEWSDAY
Baseball has indeed expanded beyond the American and National League to the Fantasy League. The stadium of the mind is embodied in the burgeoning Rotisserie League, where every fan can run his own team. Organized 11 years ago by a small group of fans and writers, an estimated 2 million persons are playing in this field of schemes.
SPORTS
April 28, 1991 | MARK POTTS, WASHINGTON POST
Just about every baseball fan thinks he or she can do a better job picking players than the general manager of any major-league team. But Rotisserie or fantasy-league players know it isn't as easy as it looks. Perhaps the most crucial part of the Rotisserie season is its beginning -- the auction or draft of players in which participants fill their 23-player rosters. Strategies vary, but here are a few draft-day rules of thumb for fantasy-baseball general managers.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | NICOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Rose lives in a world in which he can trade speedy second baseman Chuck Knoblauch for veteran pitcher Roger Clemens. He can send faxes to his fellow owners dictating the terms of free agency. He can bench Jose Canseco. But on Monday, Rose was powerless. His world--the fantasy world of rotisserie baseball--was shattered.
SPORTS
June 17, 1990 | PATRICK A. McGUIRE, BALTIMORE SUN
Not long ago I was visiting with some friends when one of them happened to mention something about Johnny Ray being dead. My heart did one of those suddenly painful and explosive things that hearts like to do just before they stop ticking forever. "Johnny Ray?" I gasped, my face turning the shade of a freshly brushed home plate. "Dead?" "Such a wonderful singer," said the friend. "Oh," I mumbled sheepishly, the pink slowly returning to my face. "That Johnny Ray." "What other Johnny Ray is there?"
SPORTS
April 28, 1991 | MARK POTTS, WASHINGTON POST; (Washington Post financial reporter Mark Potts has been playing Rotisserie for seven years. He won for the first time last season.)
When Bo Jackson was released by the Kansas City Royals last month after suffering a career-threatening hip injury, a large group of peculiarly crazed sports fans was plunged into mourning. They weren't members of the Royals fan club. Rather, the tens of thousands whose day was ruined by the "Bo Goes" headlines were his other "owners": the budding George Steinbrenners who are participants in Rotisserie, or fantasy, baseball leagues.
TRAVEL
September 2, 1990 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, the three essential baseball nutrients--a dog, a brew and a bag of nuts--were enough to satisfy every fan's appetite. But the food game is changing. Most stadiums today offer a selection of dishes that rivals the buffet table at Bob's Big Boy. I found every food imaginable--from Buffalo-style chicken wings to beef burritos--during a recent tour of seven stadiums in the Midwest and East.
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