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NEWS
September 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Rottweilers have passed pit bulls as America's deadliest dog breed, according to a federal study released in Atlanta. The large dogs were involved in 33 fatal attacks on humans from 1991 through 1998, the American Veterinary Medical Assn. said. Pit bulls, which had been responsible for more deaths than any other breed, were involved in 21 fatal attacks over the same period.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter
About 100 people held a spirited protest in front of the Hawthorne police headquarters Saturday, angered by an officer's fatal shooting last week of a Rottweiler who approached police aggressively as the dog's owner was being arrested. "We're here to let the police know how much we care about this," said David Rutan, 48, a Manhattan Beach lawyer speaking above a din of chants. Rutan said the protest was spurred not just by outrage over the killing of a dog named Max, who approached officers while barking aggressively after they handcuffed his owner, but also by wariness of police power in general.
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NEWS
November 1, 1996 | Associated Press
A pack of six Rottweiler dogs fatally mauled a 10-year-old boy as he walked into his grandmother's front yard Thursday. Corey Hines died in a hospital shortly after the dogs ran from next door and attacked him from behind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton and Veronica Rocha
Hawthorne police are receiving threats after a video of officers fatally shooting a Rottweiler was posted on the Internet. The department is investigating all "credible" threats and beefing up security, spokesman Lt. Scott Swain said. No other details were provided. The controversy surrounds a video posted on YouTube showing a confrontation Sunday afternoon between police and Leon Rosby at 137th Street and Jefferson Avenue. Discussion: Weigh in on shooting of dog by Hawthorne police Officials and witnesses said Rosby, 52, stopped at the corner to shoot video of a police standoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2002 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
A 78-year-old woman was in serious but stable condition Monday after being attacked by four Rottweilers at her daughter's Capistrano Beach home. "It was pretty nasty," said Lt. Dave Wilson, a spokesman for the Orange County Sheriff's Department. "The good news is that she doesn't have any injuries to her neck or head. She does have some pretty substantial punctures and tears to her left thigh and both arms, though, and they were pretty serious wounds."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2009 | Tony Perry
The Marine Corps is moving to ban dogs with aggressive temperaments from Camp Pendleton and other bases under a policy developed after a 3-year-old boy at Camp Lejeune, N.C., was fatally bitten by a pit bull. The banned breeds are pit bulls, Rottweilers and wolf hybrids. Families moving into base housing are no longer allowed to bring those breeds. Families already there can keep their dogs until Sept. 30, 2012, but only if they receive a "good-dog" waiver. Camp Pendleton has yet to determine how dogs will be evaluated to see if they qualify for a waiver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2005 | Wendy Lee, Times Staff Writer
Glendale police on Thursday said no decision had been made on whether to file charges in the mauling death of a 16-month-old girl by the family's Rottweiler. "At this time, charges are not being considered because of the ongoing investigation and the completion of the coroner's report, which will determine the cause of death," Sgt. Tom Lorenz said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990 | DAVAN MAHARAJ and MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 6-year-old boy was mauled Friday by a pair of Rottweilers as he played with a friend near his home, police and neighbors said. The dogs bit Jeffrey Kerley on his legs, arms, stomach, back and buttocks before he was rescued by his sister and some neighbors who heard his screams. "The dogs were just throwing him around," said Jeffrey's 15-year-old sister, Michelle Barker. "One dog was on one leg and the other was on the other leg." The incident occurred around 3 p.m.
NEWS
April 14, 1993
Re "A Status Symbol with Real Bite" (March 26): Please send Rip Rense to the Golden State Rottweiler Club's Annual Show and Trial in June. There he will see Rottweilers participating in obedience trials, carting and general dog activities. He will find that a large number of the dogs belong to families or to women--without tattoos. Rottweilers, if treated well, are friendly, loving pets. The same is true of pit bulls and other large breeds. We would appreciate a little good press for a change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1987 | ALAN C. MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles authorities began an investigation Monday into whether the owners of two powerful Rottweiler dogs allowed them to run loose, terrifying a Brentwood neighborhood for weeks and mauling a physician so brutally that it took 4 1/2 hours of surgery and 200 stitches to close his wounds. The Animal Regulation Department expects to ask the city attorney's office to seek criminal charges against the Rottweilers' owners for allegedly permitting vicious or dangerous dogs to run loose, said Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
A video showing a Hawthorne police officer fatally shooting a dog is drawing outrage on the Internet, and its owner claims he was targeted because of pending claims against the department. The shooting Sunday occurred after a standoff between police and armed robbery suspects near the intersection of 137th Street and Jefferson Avenue. Officers handcuffed bystander Leon Rosby, 52, after he walked close to the scene with an 80-pound Rottweiler on a “long leash-line," creating “an increasingly dangerous situation,” the Hawthorne Police Department said in statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
Leon Rosby arrived at 137th Street and Jefferson Avenue in Hawthorne on Sunday evening to videotape a police standoff. He brought along his 2-year-old Rottweiler, Max. He put the dog on a leash and began filming. Hawthorne police deemed Rosby's actions interference and placed him under arrest. By this point, Max was in the backseat of Rosby's car, but the arrest upset him. He began barking, jumped out of the car and lunged at officers. One of the officers drew a gun and fired four times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Larry Hill is the dean of a small network of dog trainers who are out to save the bully breeds - pit bulls, mastiffs and Rottweilers - of South Los Angeles. His specialty is tough dogs in tough neighborhoods. In his professional work and monthly free classes, he takes lunging, yelping masses of dog flesh and molds them into gentle companions. Hill's mantra is there is nothing wrong with the dogs. It's the owners who have the problem, as I discovered one Saturday morning at St. Andrews Recreation Center in Gramercy Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2009 | Tony Perry
The Marine Corps is moving to ban dogs with aggressive temperaments from Camp Pendleton and other bases under a policy developed after a 3-year-old boy at Camp Lejeune, N.C., was fatally bitten by a pit bull. The banned breeds are pit bulls, Rottweilers and wolf hybrids. Families moving into base housing are no longer allowed to bring those breeds. Families already there can keep their dogs until Sept. 30, 2012, but only if they receive a "good-dog" waiver. Camp Pendleton has yet to determine how dogs will be evaluated to see if they qualify for a waiver.
HOME & GARDEN
July 25, 2009 | Dawn Bonker
Those doe-eyed, tail-wagging pooches waiting for new homes may be as loyal as any dog lover could want. But anyone planning to adopt or purchase a dog should beware: Fido or Fifi could be a killer when it comes to homeowner liability insurance. Based on the dog-bite claims they see, insurers feel that some breeds are a poor risk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2009 | From Times Staff Reports
Despite fierce criticism, Lancaster officials have unanimously adopted an ordinance that will impose stiff penalties on the owners of "potentially dangerous" and "vicious" dogs, particularly those that law enforcement officials say are favored by gang members to intimidate rivals and others. Under the new law, dogs that are unprovoked and engage in aggressive behavior, may be found to be "potentially dangerous."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Following the lead of San Francisco and San Jose, Los Angeles County supervisors on Tuesday asked the county counsel to draw up an ordinance that would require spaying and neutering of many pit bulls and Rottweilers. As in other communities, several animal activists opposed the requirement. But Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich, who offered the motion, cited a recent pit bull attack on a 11-month-old girl to argue it was necessary. The county intends to exempt professional breeders.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Three questions for Rose Dosti ("When Good Intentions Go Straight to the Dogs," Aug. 17): 1. Why didn't you call Animal Control for pickup of the two lost poodles instead of assuming the pound was the worst place to take them? Animal Control is the first place owners call to find lost pets. 2. What if two Rottweilers (for the two leashes on the doorknob) lived in the backyard where you dumped the poodles? Hors d'oeuvres for them! 3. How do you think the dogs got out if it was their yard?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2009 | Ann M. Simmons
The city of Lancaster is considering adopting stiff penalties for owners of "potentially dangerous" and "vicious" dogs, particularly those that law enforcement officials say are favored by gang members and used for intimidation. The proposed ordinance would also require spaying and neutering of all varieties of pit bulls and Rottweilers, including mutts that have "predominant physical characteristics" of those breeds. "I want gangs out of Lancaster," Mayor R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2006 | Cynthia H. Cho, Times Staff Writer
A plan to crack down on pit bulls and Rottweilers -- aimed at reducing the number of dog attacks -- has mushroomed into a far more sweeping proposal that would require the spaying or neutering of most dogs in unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County. About 1 million residents could be affected by the ordinance, which supervisors expect to revisit next month.
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