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NEWS
April 15, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1998, Global Witness, a London-based nongovernmental organization that focuses on the links between environmental and human-rights abuses, published a groundbreaking report on "conflict" or "blood diamonds." The report documented how trade in rough diamonds has funded and prolonged conflicts in Angola and Sierra Leone. De Beers and Global Witness define "conflict diamonds" as those that originate from areas in Africa controlled by forces fighting against legitimate governments.
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WORLD
February 19, 2013 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
PARIS - In barely five minutes, thieves in Belgium pulled off one of the most spectacular and dramatic diamond heists in years. A Helvetic Airways jet on the tarmac at Brussels Airport was preparing for takeoff to Switzerland shortly before 8 p.m. Monday. The passengers were on board, the bags were in the hold, the doors were closed and the crew was going through the last safety checks. Brinks security guards had just finished transferring a consignment of cut and uncut diamonds worth an estimated $50 million from their armored vehicle to the plane.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2006
A recent Times article quoted a human-rights advocate as wondering why the diamond industry was conducting a public-education campaign about conflict diamonds ["Crystallizing Opinion," by Elizabeth Snead, Oct. 10]. The answer is simple. When it comes to conflict diamonds, we have a lot to be proud of. Instead of just wringing our hands over the problem, we did something about it. Starting in 2000, we began working with the United Nations, individual governments and nongovernmental organizations to create what is called the Kimberley Process Certification System.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Harry Winston Diamond Corp., actor Ben Affleck's go-to brand for engagement rings, will shell out $500 million to buy a controlling interest in a Canadian diamond mine. The Toronto purveyor of precious stones struck a deal with Australian-based BHP Billiton to take over the company's 80% stake in the Ekati mine 120 miles south of the Arctic Circle. Harry Winston will also gain BHP's sales, sorting and marketing operations. Ekati is Canada's first diamond mine. Each year for the past five, it has produced more than $750 million worth of rough diamonds, or 6% of the world's supply by value.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1997 | Associated Press
Russia's diamond monopoly signed a long-awaited trade deal with South African cartel De Beers, opening the way for exports of large quantities of Russian diamonds. Under the agreement, De Beers will buy at least $550 million in rough gem diamonds from Russia--or about half the country's annual output--in 1997 and 1998. For the other half, diamond monopoly Almazy Rossii-Sakha will let Russian cutters choose the best quality gems, then sell the remaining unwanted stones to De Beers.
WORLD
December 5, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
An early proponent of the United Nations effort to prevent so-called blood diamonds from reaching global markets announced Sunday that it was quitting the oversight group to protest the sale of uncut gems from Zimbabwe, which is accused of human rights abuses in one of its largest diamond fields. The withdrawal of the Global Witness watchdog group from the Kimberley Process certification program, which is governed by diamond-trading nations, highlights growing problems in the system set up in 2003 to stop sales of rough diamonds from African war zones.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Harry Winston Diamond Corp., actor Ben Affleck's go-to brand for engagement rings, will shell out $500 million to buy a controlling interest in a Canadian diamond mine. The Toronto purveyor of precious stones struck a deal with Australian-based BHP Billiton to take over the company's 80% stake in the Ekati mine 120 miles south of the Arctic Circle. Harry Winston will also gain BHP's sales, sorting and marketing operations. Ekati is Canada's first diamond mine. Each year for the past five, it has produced more than $750 million worth of rough diamonds, or 6% of the world's supply by value.
NEWS
December 29, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the gem industry version of "The Clash of the Titans," Russia and the DeBeers diamond monopoly are locked in economic combat that could diminish one of this country's most promising revenue prospects and break the marketing stranglehold of one of the world's last cartels.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1986 | From Reuters
The world diamond business has regained its sparkle after suffering the worst recession in its history in the last five years. The 23rd World Diamond Congress, held here earlier this month, found dealers, manufacturers and producers in a buoyant mood, with prices rising again and jewelry sales setting records. It was perhaps fitting that the convention should be held in Israel, which now cuts half of the world's diamonds and has led the recovery.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, Times International Economics Correspondent and
Ten times a year, the diamond industry's elite--about 150 dealers, wholesalers and cutting factory owners--come here from all over the world. The occasion is called a "sight" and its participants--more than a dozen of them from the United States--are "sight holders." They gather every five weeks at 17 Charterhouse St., headquarters of the Central Selling Organization, the marketing arm of the international diamond cartel run by De Beers of South Africa.
WORLD
December 5, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
An early proponent of the United Nations effort to prevent so-called blood diamonds from reaching global markets announced Sunday that it was quitting the oversight group to protest the sale of uncut gems from Zimbabwe, which is accused of human rights abuses in one of its largest diamond fields. The withdrawal of the Global Witness watchdog group from the Kimberley Process certification program, which is governed by diamond-trading nations, highlights growing problems in the system set up in 2003 to stop sales of rough diamonds from African war zones.
SPORTS
November 15, 2008
The off-season is here and here's what has happened. 1. Dodgers make a very weak offer to Manny Ramirez just to appease the fans. 2. A's get Matt Holliday. 3. Looks like Jake Peavy is heading to the Cubs. 4. Dodgers make no offer to CC Sabathia. Jerry Buss says he will do anything it takes, even pay the luxury tax, to keep a great team together. Maybe Mark Cuban can buy the Dodgers instead of the Cubs and have Frank be his parking lot attendant Patrick Drohan Monrovia -- With people literally starving to death in our own country, jerks like Scott Boras get to milk the cow for all its worth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2006
A recent Times article quoted a human-rights advocate as wondering why the diamond industry was conducting a public-education campaign about conflict diamonds ["Crystallizing Opinion," by Elizabeth Snead, Oct. 10]. The answer is simple. When it comes to conflict diamonds, we have a lot to be proud of. Instead of just wringing our hands over the problem, we did something about it. Starting in 2000, we began working with the United Nations, individual governments and nongovernmental organizations to create what is called the Kimberley Process Certification System.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2004 | Joy Buchanan and Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writers
Lauren Cruz and her teammates on the Alhambra High School girls' softball team field grounders, catch pop flies and avoid potholes. Cruz, who plays shortstop, said she doesn't understand why her team has to play on a school field that is bumpy and cluttered with trash, weeds, holes and gym equipment, while the boys' baseball teams play on a new off-campus field that cost $900,000. "It's not fair," Cruz, 15, said. "I want the best opportunities so I can play in college."
SPORTS
April 18, 2003 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
It's not uncommon for a high school coach to discover hidden talent in a physical education class. What's a little more unusual is finding an ace pitcher in an English class. That's the tale of pitcher Jonathan Hernandez from Carson High. He was plucked out of his sophomore English class two years ago by baseball Coach Kurt Ruth, who had a hunch. "He looked like a physical guy and always talked about baseball," Ruth said. "I told him, 'Why not try out for the team?'
NEWS
April 15, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1998, Global Witness, a London-based nongovernmental organization that focuses on the links between environmental and human-rights abuses, published a groundbreaking report on "conflict" or "blood diamonds." The report documented how trade in rough diamonds has funded and prolonged conflicts in Angola and Sierra Leone. De Beers and Global Witness define "conflict diamonds" as those that originate from areas in Africa controlled by forces fighting against legitimate governments.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
American Investia, which is believed to have collected millions of dollars from California investors by offering unusually high interest rates on investments purportedly backed by diamonds, has halted operations as state authorities press an investigation of its business. The Swedish-owned firm has been headquartered for several years in the penthouse of a Beverly Hills office building.
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