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December 28, 1991
Steve Howe's game of career roulette needs to come to an end. He makes Dexter Manley look like a choirboy. Where can I find a job that pays me too much money to be irresponsible? MARK ESSA Los Angeles
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
It's hard to say exactly what skills are needed to become an expert at the game of Egg Russian Roulette, but it's safe to say that Edward Norton has them. The actor, who's hosting "Saturday Night Live" this week, stopped by "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon" to talk about the gig, praise fellow guests Pearl Jam and play an infinitely silly game of Egg Russian Roulette. As Norton himself described it, "It's like Willy Wonka meets 'The Deer Hunter' torture. " The game, as introduced by announcer Steve Higgins in an over-the-top silly voice, required Fallon and Norton to select eggs from a standard carton of a dozen and smash them on their heads.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1990
I have read many articles about the Greenhouse effect. It frightens me that despite constant warning by scientists, no concerted effort is being made by the nations of the world to prevent it. When we gamble on the validity of the Greenhouse effect, it's like playing Russian roulette. The Greenhouse gun is aimed at our world. Is the barrel loaded or empty? If nothing is done, we'll soon find out. BING LEE Laguna Niguel
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By Kate Mather
San Diego County teenager Hannah Anderson has shared more details about her kidnapping ordeal, telling NBC's "Today" show that abductor James DiMaggio made her play Russian roulette before taking her to Idaho. The interview, scheduled to air Thursday, comes more than two months after the 16-year-old was rescued from the remote Idaho wilderness after a nearly weeklong search that stretched across the western United States. The ordeal began, officials said, when 40-year-old DiMaggio lured the Anderson family to his eastern San Diego County home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1986
I am an engineer in NASA project management who has worked on the shuttle program since its inception, and in hindsight can appreciate the comments by physicist Richard Feynman in The Times article (June 11). We did deceive ourselves, unaware of the implications of accepting each past success as proof that everything was all right despite the warning signs. And as circumstances showed, it was like playing Russian roulette--taking a chance until inevitably the bullet fired. There is no question in my mind that NASA can and will learn from that tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2005
When I read the follow-up article about Joseph Deutch's "Russian roulette performance art" controversy ["The 'Shot' Heard 'Round UCLA," by Mike Boehm, July 9], my thoughts were identical to those I experienced upon reading about it the first time. Not shock at students using guns as props for final exams; not revulsion over professors who themselves used violence and mayhem in their own performances; not outrage at the hypocritical resigning of officials due to this mess; but rather this simple, logical question: My tax dollars for higher education are being used to teach this?
BUSINESS
January 11, 2009
The authors missed the obvious by focusing only on investment in green companies and not looking at green technologies. ("Green Investing 101," Your Money, Jan. 4) Companies and individuals can invest in green directly by investing in energy efficiency and renewable energy at their own facility. There is no need to play the roulette wheel of public equity markets. There are projects for every budget and returns that meet or exceed Wall Street, while giving you a lot less stress and uncertainty.
OPINION
January 11, 2006
Re "Dr. Bush's flu flim-flam," Current, Jan. 8 Is a flu pandemic a real danger? Absolutely. Is it inevitable and overdue? Not at all. This is the twisted logic of the ill-informed all-night gambler perched on a stool at the roulette wheel. He tells himself that because double-zero hasn't materialized in the last eight hours, its appearance is now "inevitable and overdue," and he bets accordingly. Nuclear war hasn't occurred since the first atomic bomb went off in 1945. Is it overdue?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2006
IT was with great alarm that I opened my Sunday paper to discover not one but two (!) photos of musicians posed on railroad tracks ["In Music or Film, Solitary Refinement Liberates OutKast," Jan. 29]. This is the kind of thing that my organization spends a great deal of time and money trying to get people not to do. As the spokesperson for Metrolink, I can tell you that this type of behavior, namely lounging around on railroad tracks, can end in tragedy. To be on a railroad right of way anywhere but at a marked crossing is illegal trespassing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton, who writes a column for Newsday in New York, worked in the White House of President George Bush. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
Lost track of who's shystering whom and who's recounting what in the disputed Florida election? Worried about being blindsided by ballot-box developments in other disputed states, such as New Mexico, New Hampshire, Iowa and Wisconsin? A physicist would say that understanding is impossible because the situation is chaotic; tiny variations of input make for 100% uncertainty as to output. Yet if one were to combine physics and power politics, one might gain a better understanding of the ultimate outcome.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
The Envelope's Gold Standard columnist Glenn Whipp is sweeping through Emmy categories this week, predicting the winners in the top categories. Having already looked at the series , lead actor and lead actress races, as well as the supporting actress category, he turns his attention here to the supporting men. SUPPORTING ACTOR, DRAMA The nominees: Jim Carter, "Downton Abbey" Brendan Coyle, "Downton Abbey" Peter Dinklage, "Game of Thrones" Giancarlo Esposito, "Breaking Bad" Jared Harris, "Mad Men" Aaron Paul, "Breaking Bad" And the winner is ... Esposito.
OPINION
July 24, 2011 | By Claire Berlinski
Seismic risk mitigation is the greatest urban policy challenge the world confronts today. If you consider that too strong a claim, try to imagine another way in which bad urban policy could kill a million people in 30 seconds. Yet the politics of earthquakes are rarely discussed and, when discussed, widely misunderstood. Take Japan's Sendai earthquake on March 11, which released 600 million times the energy of the Hiroshima bomb. The ensuing partial meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant prompted international hysteria about nuclear power, but few seemed to realize that a far deadlier threat had been averted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2010 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
Norma Gamble was cooking dinner in her Mid-City home Sunday evening when she heard a gunshot from upstairs. She ran to the second floor, where a teenage boy who had been living with the family and two teenage girls were hanging out. She found one of the girls on the floor, bleeding profusely from a bullet wound to her lower back. "My stomach hurts," said the 15-year-old. "Help me." Paramedics took the girl from the home in the 1800 block of Wellington Road to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she was pronounced dead.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2009
The authors missed the obvious by focusing only on investment in green companies and not looking at green technologies. ("Green Investing 101," Your Money, Jan. 4) Companies and individuals can invest in green directly by investing in energy efficiency and renewable energy at their own facility. There is no need to play the roulette wheel of public equity markets. There are projects for every budget and returns that meet or exceed Wall Street, while giving you a lot less stress and uncertainty.
SPORTS
October 19, 2008 | Broderick Turner, Times Staff Writer
It was the fourth exhibition game for the Lakers, another chance to make strides as they prepare for the regular-season opener Oct. 28 at home against the Portland Trail Blazers. The Lakers played Regal FC Barcelona on Saturday night in the "shootout" at Staples Center and Coach Phil Jackson had a few things he wanted his team to accomplish. "Exhibit our talent," Jackson said, smiling. For Lakers forward Pau Gasol, the game had more meaning.
OPINION
February 25, 2008 | Christopher D. Cook, Christopher D. Cook is the author of "Diet for a Dead Planet: Big Business and the Coming Food Crisis." Website: christopherdcook.com
Nauseating as it was, last week's record-setting beef recall and the apparent feeding of meat from crippled "downer" cattle to our nation's children and others should come as little surprise. Although egregious to the point of obscenity, this latest meat scandal fits a pattern of regulatory anemia -- the byproduct of a decades-long bipartisan assault on "big government" -- that has opened the floodgates to all sorts of contamination shenanigans.
TRAVEL
April 2, 2006
THANK you for the insight in "An Overhaul Due for Oversized Bags in Overstuffed Bins?" [Travel Insider, Feb. 26]. I supervise customer service for an airline, and I recently had to (quite forcibly) ask a handful of passengers to gate-check their luggage. All were businessmen who had large garment bags on wheels which exceeded (by far) the carry-on size limits. Our flights were extremely full, and these men delayed our boarding process by arguing that their bags would indeed fit into the overhead compartments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001
Thank you for "A Bad Day for the Rose Bowl" (editorial, Dec. 8), on the bowl championship series, which could be seen by more than just those who read only the sports section. For years the team that finished the season at the top of the polls was called the "mythical" national champion, a recognition of the fact that the title was based on opinion, not competition. If the BCS was created to eliminate the subjectivity of opinion, why are the polls still part of the formula? And who decides how much weight each of the categories should have?
MAGAZINE
January 6, 2008 | Nicole LaPorte, Nicole LaPorte is a Venice-based writer who covers the entertainment industry. Contact her at magazine@latimes.com.
With another year in the rearview mirror, so goes another set of moviemaking rules--those fleeting formulas that provide deceptively simple answers to the question everyone in Hollywood lives and dies by: What will lure millions of popcorn munchers from their plasma screens (and computers and video games) and into the theaters? To understand how uncertain the science of producing a hit movie is, try putting the question to a studio head. Chances are, you'll be told that it's all about "gut instinct" and an ability to combine the "right" actor with the "right" script with the "right" director at the "right" time.
OPINION
January 4, 2008 | Ted W. Lieu, Ted W. Lieu represents California's 53rd Assembly District, which includes LAX. He is also the chairman of the California Assembly Aerospace Select Committee.
Being a passenger on a Southwest Airlines jet doing evasive maneuvers is not my idea of a good time. We were landing at Los Angeles International Airport on a clear day in early 2006, and we were low enough that my view was partly blocked by a building with a big green Herbalife sign. All of a sudden, the plane veered sharply upward and the engines started roaring. I could hear the passenger next to me say, "Something is really wrong." I thought, "Please God, don't let me die in a plane crash."
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