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Roulette Records

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BUSINESS
May 26, 1988 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Morris Levy, president of New York-based Roulette Records and a longtime behind-the-scenes power in the music business, was found guilty Wednesday of conspiring to extort a Philadelphia-area record distributor in the 1984 purchase of nearly 5 million so-called cutout, or discontinued, recordings from MCA Records. Convicted along with Levy in U.S. District Court in Camden, N.J.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
There are some weeks when it seems appropriate to call this column the Rhino Records Corner, because the Santa Monica-based label continues to come up with so many impressive CD reissues from the early days of rock. The latest examples are the first four titles in a series of packages that are being released in connection with Rhino's acquisition of the North American rights to the catalogues of Roulette Records and associated labels.
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BUSINESS
October 29, 1988 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Morris Levy--longtime president of New York-based Roulette Records and one of the most colorful and influential figures in the U.S. record industry--was sentenced to 10 years in prison Friday and fined $200,000 for conspiring to extort a customer in the 1984 purchase of more than 4 million so-called cutouts, or discontinued recordings, from MCA Records. The sentence was handed down by U.S. District Judge Stanley S. Brotman in Camden, N.J.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1988 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Morris Levy--longtime president of New York-based Roulette Records and one of the most colorful and influential figures in the U.S. record industry--was sentenced to 10 years in prison Friday and fined $200,000 for conspiring to extort a customer in the 1984 purchase of more than 4 million so-called cutouts, or discontinued recordings, from MCA Records. The sentence was handed down by U.S. District Judge Stanley S. Brotman in Camden, N.J.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1986 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER JR., Times Staff Writer
After a two-year probe of alleged mob infiltration of the record business, FBI agents on Tuesday arrested the president of a New York City record company and 16 other people on charges ranging from cocaine and heroin trafficking to extortion. Among those seized in a dawn sweep were Morris Levy, president of New York City-based Roulette Records; Howard Fisher, Roulette's controller, and Dominick Canterino, reputedly a leader in New York's Genovese crime family.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
There are some weeks when it seems appropriate to call this column the Rhino Records Corner, because the Santa Monica-based label continues to come up with so many impressive CD reissues from the early days of rock. The latest examples are the first four titles in a series of packages that are being released in connection with Rhino's acquisition of the North American rights to the catalogues of Roulette Records and associated labels.
NEWS
May 28, 1990
Morris Levy, 62, who owned the jazz nightclub Birdland and whose record company produced such hits in the 1950s as "Why Do Fools Fall in Love" and "Peppermint Twist." Levy's Birdland, named after saxophonist Charlie (Bird) Parker, was a world-famous jazz mecca in New York City. Levy became a music publisher and record company mogul in the '50s. His Roulette Records was one of the leading independent companies and helped develop such stars as Tommy James.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ella Johnson, 86, a jazz and blues singer who in the 1940s and '50s performed in dance bands led by her brother Buddy Johnson, died in New York City on Feb. 16, the New York Times reported. A native of Darlington, N. C., Johnson moved to New York at the age of 17 to be with her brother, who began featuring her on recordings, mainly for the Decca label. She had several hits with her brother's band, including "Please Mr. Johnson" in 1940.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1988 | JIM MEROD
In the late '50s, Maynard Ferguson led a big band noted for the superior improvisational, composing and arranging skills displayed by its members. The band's series of Roulette records announced the arrival of a musical force with an uncommon commitment to straight-ahead blowing.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1988 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Morris Levy, president of New York-based Roulette Records and a longtime behind-the-scenes power in the music business, was found guilty Wednesday of conspiring to extort a Philadelphia-area record distributor in the 1984 purchase of nearly 5 million so-called cutout, or discontinued, recordings from MCA Records. Convicted along with Levy in U.S. District Court in Camden, N.J.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1986 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER JR., Times Staff Writer
After a two-year probe of alleged mob infiltration of the record business, FBI agents on Tuesday arrested the president of a New York City record company and 16 other people on charges ranging from cocaine and heroin trafficking to extortion. Among those seized in a dawn sweep were Morris Levy, president of New York City-based Roulette Records; Howard Fisher, Roulette's controller, and Dominick Canterino, reputedly a leader in New York's Genovese crime family.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1988 | JIM MEROD
In the late-'50s, Maynard Ferguson led a big band noted for the superior improvisational, composing and arranging skills displayed by its members. The band's series of Roulette records announced the arrival of a musical force with an uncommon commitment to straight-ahead blowing.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1986 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
What seemed like a routine record-business deal in the spring of 1984 has come under the scrutiny of FBI and IRS agents investigating suspected organized crime infiltration of some segments of the U.S. record business. The deal--in which Los Angeles-based MCA Records sold about 5 million so-called cutout, or out-of-date, recordings to a small Philadelphia budget record distributor called Out of the Past Inc.
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