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Route 30 Freeway

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1997
Federal, state and local dignitaries broke ground Tuesday on the $1-billion dollar Route 30 Freeway between the Foothill Freeway and Interstate 15 in San Bernardino County. State Department of Transportation officials said the project will be the last freeway to begin construction in the county in this century. The freeway will follow the existing California 30 along Baseline Road, bisecting the cities of Claremont and La Verne. It is expected to be completed in 2002.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1999 | JULIE HA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local and state officials broke ground Monday on the $1.1-billion California 30 Freeway, a 28-mile stretch that will link Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties. The freeway, due for completion in 2002, is expected to lighten the commuter load now carried by Interstate 10 and other local routes. The freeway will connect the Foothill Freeway (Interstate 210), which ends in San Dimas, with Interstate 215 in San Bernardino County, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1999 | JULIE HA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local and state officials broke ground Monday on the $1.1-billion California 30 Freeway, a 28-mile stretch that will link Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties. The freeway, due for completion in 2002, is expected to lighten the commuter load now carried by Interstate 10 and other local routes. The freeway will connect the Foothill Freeway (Interstate 210), which ends in San Dimas, with Interstate 215 in San Bernardino County, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1997
Federal, state and local dignitaries broke ground Tuesday on the $1-billion dollar Route 30 Freeway between the Foothill Freeway and Interstate 15 in San Bernardino County. State Department of Transportation officials said the project will be the last freeway to begin construction in the county in this century. The freeway will follow the existing California 30 along Baseline Road, bisecting the cities of Claremont and La Verne. It is expected to be completed in 2002.
NEWS
September 3, 1987
The first comprehensive revision of the La Verne General Plan, adopted in 1974, is being drafted by city officials. Based on public response from a series of neighborhood workshops and a citywide mail survey, the plan will not recommend significant density increases anywhere in the city, said Steven A. Preston, the city's principal planner.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | RAY TESSLER and MARK STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Surprised and disappointed San Diego County transit officials Wednesday blamed anxiety over the economy and anger toward government spending for the defeat of Proposition 156, which would have given the county $120 million for rail transit projects. Californians rejected the $1-billion statewide bond measure by 52% to 48% in Tuesday's election, forcing officials in Sacramento to begin examining which transit projects will have to be scaled back, delayed or killed.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Running her finger across a huge map of a proposed freeway path, a Claremont woman said she was plenty upset because the $800-million roadway looked as if it was going to slice through her swimming pool. "Phoenix looks better every day," she said as she left a packed Claremont auditorium. Connie Belisle had a problem too. Belisle told 450 people in the auditorium Wednesday that the state highway might cut off her back-yard view of Mt. Baldy. Yet Richard L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Even with severe restrictions on future driving, it will take massive spending on new freeways and transit to prevent the daily traffic catastrophe that many fear will define life in metropolitan Southern California by 2010, a new report obtained by The Times says. At best, the report says that more than $42 billion in construction is needed just to keep the freeways running close to today's average speeds, already among the worst in the nation.
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