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Route 66 Highway

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001 | Cecilia Rasmussen
During Prohibition, tourists came here to get their kicks on the brand-new Route 66. In the Great Depression, it was a landmark for those seeking the promise of California. In the 1960s and '70s, flower children and druggies flocked here, looking for harmony. Today, the landmark Aztec Hotel is being spruced up and restored to the landmark it once was.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001 | Cecilia Rasmussen
During Prohibition, tourists came here to get their kicks on the brand-new Route 66. In the Great Depression, it was a landmark for those seeking the promise of California. In the 1960s and '70s, flower children and druggies flocked here, looking for harmony. Today, the landmark Aztec Hotel is being spruced up and restored to the landmark it once was.
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NEWS
July 8, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
. . . Kingman, Barstow, San Bernardino. Won't you get hip to this timely tip When you make that California trip Get your kicks on Route 66. --"Route 66" by Bobby Troup Three decades ago, weary travelers passing through town were warmly greeted by the neon lights of motels with such evocative names as the Desert Inn, the Sahara and the Golden Eagle. But with the advent of interstate highways and the deepening cycle of inner-city poverty, the clientele of downtown motels changed markedly.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress is getting its kicks from a bill to steer motorists back to Route 66. A House committee Wednesday approved legislation to provide $10 million for preserving historic sites along the Chicago-to-Santa Monica route that served as the main highway for Dust Bowl refugees and other Americans who went West and, in later years, families who piled into station wagons for vacations.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
Even a romantic, curious, adventuring Irishman like Shanty Devlin wasn't fully aware of the history he had encountered. He knew when he leased the abandoned Sidewinder Cafe on Route 66 that he was signing to operate a chunk of '40s folklore. But Devlin--a former teacher of hotel and restaurant management--undertook running a roadside greasy spoon as little more than a retirement pastime. Enter a traveler from another desert: Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tour along Route 66, celebrating the storied roadway's 66th anniversary, is a nostalgic journey that Asleep at the Wheel is uniquely qualified to make. "We recorded the song, 'Route 66,' three times in three different decades," notes Ray Benson, the founder and lead singer of the long-running Western-swing band. (The group's most recent go at the number is an in-concert rendition of the Bobby Troup tune on Asleep's new album, "Greatest Hits Live & Kickin.'
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
For 53 years at this fleck in the Mojave Desert, Buster Burris and Roy's Motel-Cafe have held out against drought, gas embargoes, economic oscillations of three wars--and the dismantling of Route 66. In 1952, he had 100 people working 24-hour days on food, lodging and engine changes. "They would go until exhausted, sleep a few hours and come back on duty," says lined, sun-dried Burris, 83.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1997 | ROBERT A. JONES
Their names have a certain ring: Mandalay, Redondo, Ormond Beach, Scattergood. Since the Korean War, the huge power plants of Southern California have hovered over our finest beaches like steel T. rexes. Too ugly to love. Too big to move. For half a century, we've been forced to accept them or ignore them. One more price for living in our defiled paradise. But now, an amazing development. We will soon have the chance to rid ourselves of the beach plants. Not all of them, but some.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1992 | DEBRA CANO
Dan Harlow remembers standing on Route 66, in the heat of Kingman, Ariz., his thumb out in hopes of catching a ride home to Wichita, Kan. "Oh, it was hot," Harlow said. That was more than 20 years ago, but his affection for America's first national highway has been in high gear since. "Like other historic trails, it tells the history of America," he said. Walter Willey recalled his first trip on the old highway in 1956 when it took him 3 1/2 days of nonstop driving to get from Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
First the music. "It was sunset and I was sitting in the swing on my front porch like I often do, watching the cars go by," remembers Diane Patterson, whose brick doll house fronts Route 66. "That's when I heard the old Glenn Miller tune 'String of Pearls' coming from the Elks Club." Then the road started singing to her. "Next day, I got the record, brought it here, got my map out, looked at Route 66 and all its towns and said: 'My God, it is a string of pearls.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1997 | ROBERT A. JONES
Their names have a certain ring: Mandalay, Redondo, Ormond Beach, Scattergood. Since the Korean War, the huge power plants of Southern California have hovered over our finest beaches like steel T. rexes. Too ugly to love. Too big to move. For half a century, we've been forced to accept them or ignore them. One more price for living in our defiled paradise. But now, an amazing development. We will soon have the chance to rid ourselves of the beach plants. Not all of them, but some.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1996
Celebrating an American icon in asphalt, Duarte on Saturday will host a mile-long parade marking the 70th birthday of Route 66. Classic cars will begin to roll down Huntington Drive at 9 a.m. from Cotter Street to Mount Olive Drive. Composer Bobby Troup, who wrote "Route 66," the song that invited people to "get your kicks on Route 66," will serve as grand marshal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1994 | ANN GRIFFITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Waldmire has traveled Route 66 end to end more times than he can count. He drove to the annual gathering Saturday of the California Historic Route 66 Assn. from Hackberry, Ariz., in his orange Volkswagen bus, "my mansion on wheels," which he has decorated with hand-painted maps and pasted with stickers and postcards--66 postcards, of course.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, Daniel Cerone is a Times staff writer. and
T od Stiles and Buz Murdock are visiting Jenny, a fading jazz singer who's bedridden after suffering a blackout and nearly getting hit by the two travelers in their 1961 Corvette convertible. Jenny asks the young men where their journey is leading, and what they intend to do once they get there. "Anything we can do," Stiles says politely. "Sounds like easy come, easy go," Jenny responds. A sad smile crosses Murdock's dark, handsome face. "Not exactly," he says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1992 | DEBRA CANO
Dan Harlow remembers standing on Route 66, in the heat of Kingman, Ariz., his thumb out in hopes of catching a ride home to Wichita, Kan. "Oh, it was hot," Harlow said. That was more than 20 years ago, but his affection for America's first national highway has been in high gear since. "Like other historic trails, it tells the history of America," he said. Walter Willey recalled his first trip on the old highway in 1956 when it took him 3 1/2 days of nonstop driving to get from Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
Even a romantic, curious, adventuring Irishman like Shanty Devlin wasn't fully aware of the history he had encountered. He knew when he leased the abandoned Sidewinder Cafe on Route 66 that he was signing to operate a chunk of '40s folklore. But Devlin--a former teacher of hotel and restaurant management--undertook running a roadside greasy spoon as little more than a retirement pastime. Enter a traveler from another desert: Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1996
Celebrating an American icon in asphalt, Duarte on Saturday will host a mile-long parade marking the 70th birthday of Route 66. Classic cars will begin to roll down Huntington Drive at 9 a.m. from Cotter Street to Mount Olive Drive. Composer Bobby Troup, who wrote "Route 66," the song that invited people to "get your kicks on Route 66," will serve as grand marshal.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress is getting its kicks from a bill to steer motorists back to Route 66. A House committee Wednesday approved legislation to provide $10 million for preserving historic sites along the Chicago-to-Santa Monica route that served as the main highway for Dust Bowl refugees and other Americans who went West and, in later years, families who piled into station wagons for vacations.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
For 53 years at this fleck in the Mojave Desert, Buster Burris and Roy's Motel-Cafe have held out against drought, gas embargoes, economic oscillations of three wars--and the dismantling of Route 66. In 1952, he had 100 people working 24-hour days on food, lodging and engine changes. "They would go until exhausted, sleep a few hours and come back on duty," says lined, sun-dried Burris, 83.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
First the music. "It was sunset and I was sitting in the swing on my front porch like I often do, watching the cars go by," remembers Diane Patterson, whose brick doll house fronts Route 66. "That's when I heard the old Glenn Miller tune 'String of Pearls' coming from the Elks Club." Then the road started singing to her. "Next day, I got the record, brought it here, got my map out, looked at Route 66 and all its towns and said: 'My God, it is a string of pearls.'
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