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FOOD
February 23, 2013 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
The first time I met chef Paul Prudhomme, he was peering over the stove in his narrow test kitchen, a converted shotgun house just outside the French Quarter in New Orleans. Chef was heating oil in a large cast-iron skillet, and when he saw me, he invited me over to watch him fix gumbo. When the oil was smoking hot, he quickly whisked in flour to form a roux - "Cajun napalm," he called it - the bubbling mass darkening to a deep chocolate brown in minutes. He stirred a trinity of vegetables into the roux to stop the cooking - onions, celery and bell peppers - then added the roux to a pot of boiling stock.
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FOOD
February 23, 2013 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
The first time I met chef Paul Prudhomme, he was peering over the stove in his narrow test kitchen, a converted shotgun house just outside the French Quarter in New Orleans. Chef was heating oil in a large cast-iron skillet, and when he saw me, he invited me over to watch him fix gumbo. When the oil was smoking hot, he quickly whisked in flour to form a roux - "Cajun napalm," he called it - the bubbling mass darkening to a deep chocolate brown in minutes. He stirred a trinity of vegetables into the roux to stop the cooking - onions, celery and bell peppers - then added the roux to a pot of boiling stock.
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FOOD
September 22, 2012 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: We recently visited the Hog's Breath Inn at Carmel by the Sea, Calif. Our party particularly enjoyed what surely must be its signature soup, made from artichokes. It was so delicious that I'd be surprised if you hadn't already obtained the recipe and shared it with your readers. If you could coerce the recipe from the inn and share (perhaps again), we would be so thankful. Thanks. Mike Hough Highland, Calif. Dear Mike: Artichoke lovers, rejoice! We loved this rich, creamy soup from Carmel's own Hog's Breath Inn, which touts its "Old West ambience" with scenic fireplace murals, mounted hog heads and paintings of Clint Eastwood.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
This week's Culinary SOS request comes from Mike Hough in Highland, Calif.: "We recently visited the Hog's Breath Inn at Carmel by the Sea, Calif. Our party particularly enjoyed what surely must be its signature soup, made from artichokes. It was so delicious that I'd be surprised if you hadn't already obtained the recipe and shared it with your readers. If you could coerce the recipe from the inn and share (perhaps again), we would be so thankful. Thanks. " Artichoke lovers, rejoice!
FOOD
July 9, 1987 | DIANA WILLIAMS HANSEN, Hansen is a Louisville-based cooking consultant specializing in microwaving
Every so often my husband, who was born and reared in Mobile, Ala., gets a hankering for gumbo, and I have to make this seafood stew using his mother's recipe. By virtue of its location on the Gulf of Mexico, Mobile is richly blessed with seafood, which the locals eat almost daily. My mother-in-law made crab gumbo as frequently as my own mother, who kept house in the Midwest, made beef and vegetable soup.
FOOD
May 26, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear SOS: On a recent visit to the Philadelphia area, I encountered the absolute best Welsh rarebit at a local British pub. The Whip Tavern serves a rarebit that combines good English cheddar and Stilton cheeses with Smithwick's Irish Ale, spiced with a bit of British mustard. Served with crostini. Stunning. Now 3,000 miles away, I am trying to re-create this marvelous dish. Can you get us the recipe for this great comfort food, please? WIlliam McCuskey Los Angeles Dear William: The Whip Tavern was happy to share its recipe for this rich, cheesy dish, browned under a broiler and served alongside plenty of crostini for dipping.
FOOD
July 24, 1986 | DIANA WILLIAMS HANSEN, Hansen is a Louisville-based cooking consultant specializing in microwaving
Many types of today's popular Cajun food adapt very well to microwaving. The strong, vibrant flavors of this cuisine--especially the entrees--depend on fresh foods seasoned with hot spices that are blended with the food through cooking. Typically, three kinds of pepper are added to meat and fish dishes to achieve the right balance of pepper flavor. As one Cajun authority said, "Each kind of pepper excites a different part of the mouth."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2010
La Roux Where: Club Nokia, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles When: 8 p.m. Thursday Price: Sold out Info: (213) 765-7000
FOOD
June 27, 1991 | DALE CURRY, Curry is the food editor of the New Orleans Times-Picayune
Paul Prudhomme is happy. "I'm mobile. I work 18 hours a day. I wake up every morning feeling wonderful," he says. But about two years ago, at 485 pounds, he was not so happy. "I got to an uncomfortable weight and I had to do something," he says. First, he tried powdered diet products and even got creative with them, inventing new recipes. "I got sick of it and decided it was time to get serious," he says. "With my ability to cook, I changed to food."
SPORTS
August 16, 1996 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Lionel Roux of France scored his second consecutive victory over a seeded player, knocking No. 9 Stefan Edberg out of the RCA Championships, 6-3, 6-4, Thursday at Indianapolis. Roux, ranked 112th in the world, defeated No. 7 Jason Stoltenberg earlier in the tennis tournament. Tommy Haas, an 18-year-old German playing in his first tour event, also won his second match against a seeded player when he defeated No. 10 Mark Woodforde, 7-6 (7-3), 6-2. A day earlier, Haas defeated No. 8 Renzo Furlan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The Hair of Harold Roux A Novel Thomas Williams Introduction by Andre Dubus III, afterword by Ann Joslin Williams Bloomsbury: 384 pp., $15 paper Thomas Williams' novel "The Hair of Harold Roux" occupies a peculiar limbo of the lost: Published in 1974, it shared the 1975 National Book Award for fiction with Robert Stone's "Dog Soldiers," then disappeared almost entirely from the landscape of contemporary literature. The same might also be said of its author, who published nine books of fiction before his death of lung cancer in 1990 at age 63. Before this month, the only book of his to remain in print was a posthumous 1992 collection of stories, "Leah, New Hampshire," named for the fictional town where much of his work is set. Here, we see the paradox of Williams' career: a well-regarded writer, friend and mentor to Andre Dubus III and John Irving, among others, and yet as unknown now as if he'd never written anything.
FOOD
May 26, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear SOS: On a recent visit to the Philadelphia area, I encountered the absolute best Welsh rarebit at a local British pub. The Whip Tavern serves a rarebit that combines good English cheddar and Stilton cheeses with Smithwick's Irish Ale, spiced with a bit of British mustard. Served with crostini. Stunning. Now 3,000 miles away, I am trying to re-create this marvelous dish. Can you get us the recipe for this great comfort food, please? WIlliam McCuskey Los Angeles Dear William: The Whip Tavern was happy to share its recipe for this rich, cheesy dish, browned under a broiler and served alongside plenty of crostini for dipping.
FOOD
August 5, 2010 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: My husband and I are in love with the seafood jambalaya linguine at King's Fish House in Long Beach. Can you get the recipe? Dave & Christine Formella Long Beach Dear Dave and Christine: With flavors combining a homemade Creole seasoning blend and rich brown roux, this jambalaya packs a nice depth of flavor with a little added kick. Finish the dish with a little andouille sausage and fresh seafood, then toss in some pasta right before serving for a rich, hearty one-dish meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2010
La Roux Where: Club Nokia, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles When: 8 p.m. Thursday Price: Sold out Info: (213) 765-7000
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2010 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy, Los Angeles Times
Elly Jackson has never felt comfortable in girly clothing. In a pop world of in-your-face sexuality and scantily clad stars tiptoeing around in high heels, the singer for British synth-pop duo La Roux would rather wear flats. But when she explains this to photo-shoot stylists, they seem baffled, says Jackson. "They don't think you're serious. Like, 'Seriously, you don't want these Jimmy Choos?' No, you could give me a room of them and I wouldn't care. But if you put me in a room of Gucci loafers, I'd live in there."
IMAGE
April 11, 2010 | By Melissa Magsaysay, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to style, truly unabashed style that's as interesting as it is influential, musicians are at the forefront. Prince, Blondie, Siouxsie Sioux and Michael Jackson are obvious examples — perhaps because they are consistently referenced by young artists as inspiration for their onstage looks. The long list of musicians (and their faithful followers) flocking to the desert next weekend for the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival includes a few style-setting female artists who are generating buzz for their fashion choices as well as their sound, including the poster girl for fashionable pop singers, Charlotte Gainsbourg.
MAGAZINE
December 11, 2005 | Laurie Winer, Laurie Winer is a frequent contributor to The Times' Food section.
[turkey with mole negro] Maria de Jesus Monterrubio has just moved into a new house on Mount Olympus in Laurel Canyon. The marble front hall is crowned with a crystal chandelier. There are two sitting rooms, one more formal, the other lined with beautifully framed photos of her five children. Relaxed in a ponytail and jeans, Maria has come a long way since arriving in Los Angeles in 1994, when she spoke no English and cleaned houses to help make ends meet.
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