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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
In Thursday's “Scandal” season finale, Olivia finally seizes the opportunity to stand in the sun, boarding a plane bound for who-knows-where with Jake at her side, if not exactly in her heart. After the death of little Jerry, the bombing at Sen. Hightower's funeral and her own father's stabbing, Olivia decides that she is the real scandal, the common denominator in all the misfortune around her. What Olivia doesn't know is that by leaving, she won't be making things better, she's removing the last obstacle standing in the way of the person who's truly the problem -- dear old Dad. It's essentially a replay of her sabotage of B613 two weeks ago, which she thought would solve all her problems but only ended up putting Fitz's life in danger.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
In Thursday's “Scandal” season finale, Olivia finally seizes the opportunity to stand in the sun, boarding a plane bound for who-knows-where with Jake at her side, if not exactly in her heart. After the death of little Jerry, the bombing at Sen. Hightower's funeral and her own father's stabbing, Olivia decides that she is the real scandal, the common denominator in all the misfortune around her. What Olivia doesn't know is that by leaving, she won't be making things better, she's removing the last obstacle standing in the way of the person who's truly the problem -- dear old Dad. It's essentially a replay of her sabotage of B613 two weeks ago, which she thought would solve all her problems but only ended up putting Fitz's life in danger.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Calming would-be suicide bombers, negotiating a hostage crisis, throwing herself into a sniper's cross hairs, sniffing out CIA coverups and finding out her most trusted employee is a brainwashed killer beholden to her ruthless father: Just another day on the job for Olivia Pope. It's a testament to the complete insanity of “Scandal” that “Mrs. Smith Goes to Washington” -- in which a mild-mannered Midwestern mom wanders into her representative's office on Capital Hill wearing an explosive vest at the exact same moment an intruder barges into the White House -- is probably the most restrained episode we've seen so far in Season 3. Now, don't get me wrong, this was still a fun-filled hour of television.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
By the standards of “Scandal,” “Icarus” is a remarkably uneventful episode. Oh, sure, some mysterious brunet gets killed, Olivia confronts Fitz about Operation Remington and Olivia signs up to work with Josie Marcus, the single biggest threat to Fitz's reelection. But really, the most memorable revelation in this hour is that, before she subsisted on a diet of Cabernet and popcorn, young Olivia was a fan of Fruit Loops. Shocking indeed. That's not to say this wasn't a wholly enjoyable hour -- it was -- only that this episode was more about setting up all the crazy yet to come.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
By the standards of “Scandal,” “Icarus” is a remarkably uneventful episode. Oh, sure, some mysterious brunet gets killed, Olivia confronts Fitz about Operation Remington and Olivia signs up to work with Josie Marcus, the single biggest threat to Fitz's reelection. But really, the most memorable revelation in this hour is that, before she subsisted on a diet of Cabernet and popcorn, young Olivia was a fan of Fruit Loops. Shocking indeed. That's not to say this wasn't a wholly enjoyable hour -- it was -- only that this episode was more about setting up all the crazy yet to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Before the Season 3 premiere of “Scandal,” you could count the things we knew about Olivia Pope on one hand: she liked wine, popcorn and highly impractical outerwear. And, oh yeah, she has a desperate and unstoppable attraction to the married president of the United States, Fitzgerald Grant, one that makes her do crazy things like steal elections. Beyond that, however, Olivia was always a bit of an enigma, someone who kept her own secrets deeply hidden in order to preserve her aura of invincibility -- like a female version of Don Draper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1988
The story of the Carl Rowan shooting in Washington D.C. is not one about politics. Nor is it one of Rowan's personal integrity. It is, however, a classic example of stupidity. Rowan said that he was concerned for the safety of his wife, who was obviously so terrified that she slept through the whole ordeal. He called the police, who arrived in a mere 10 minutes, then went out the back door to let them in. Why didn't he let them in the front door? That way the police could handle the situation, like they are trained to do, and Rowan would never have had to leave the safety of the house.
NEWS
July 30, 1988 | Washington Post
Columnist Carl T. Rowan is expected to plead not guilty to misdemeanor charges of possession of an unregistered revolver and ammunition in D.C. Superior Court on Monday, according to his lawyer. In an interview Friday, attorney Raoul L. Carroll complained that the D.C. office of corporation counsel had violated an agreement on Tuesday when it sought from a Superior Court judge, but was denied, an arrest warrant for Rowan, a nationally syndicated writer.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Syndicated columnist Carl T. Rowan was taken to Georgetown University Hospital Thursday night when he fainted after giving a speech, hospital officials said. Rowan's condition and the cause of his collapse were not immediately available, but Georgetown University spokesman Jim Kurtzke said the columnist was "alert, he's conscious, he's sitting up." An ambulance dispatcher, who would not give his name, said Rowan was taken to the hospital after suffering apparent heat exhaustion.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Authorities announced today they will drop a weapons-possession charge against syndicated columnist Carl T. Rowan, whose trial last week resulted in a hung jury. "While I continue to believe that Mr. Rowan, in fact and in law, committed the offenses for which he was prosecuted . . . the district's ability to obtain a fair hearing in this matter has been undermined," said Frederick D. Cooke, the District of Columbia corporation counsel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Calming would-be suicide bombers, negotiating a hostage crisis, throwing herself into a sniper's cross hairs, sniffing out CIA coverups and finding out her most trusted employee is a brainwashed killer beholden to her ruthless father: Just another day on the job for Olivia Pope. It's a testament to the complete insanity of “Scandal” that “Mrs. Smith Goes to Washington” -- in which a mild-mannered Midwestern mom wanders into her representative's office on Capital Hill wearing an explosive vest at the exact same moment an intruder barges into the White House -- is probably the most restrained episode we've seen so far in Season 3. Now, don't get me wrong, this was still a fun-filled hour of television.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Before the Season 3 premiere of “Scandal,” you could count the things we knew about Olivia Pope on one hand: she liked wine, popcorn and highly impractical outerwear. And, oh yeah, she has a desperate and unstoppable attraction to the married president of the United States, Fitzgerald Grant, one that makes her do crazy things like steal elections. Beyond that, however, Olivia was always a bit of an enigma, someone who kept her own secrets deeply hidden in order to preserve her aura of invincibility -- like a female version of Don Draper.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
The "Boy Meets World" spinoff has found its girl. Cory and Topanga's daughter will be played by 11-year-old Rowan Blanchard, a Disney Channel rep confirmed to the Ministry. "I have a beautiful, new daughter. Welcome to the family @rowblanchard ! # GirlMeetsWorld ," show star Ben Savage tweeted Tuesday. PHOTOS: High school TV ensembles "Girl Meets World" will center on Riley (Blanchard), the daughter of Cory Matthews (Savage) and Topanga Lawrence (Danielle Fishel)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Billy Barnes, a composer and lyricist whose music and devilishly funny lyrics were displayed on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" in the 1960s and '70s and in his earlier series of satirical music revues in Hollywood that launched the careers of performers such as Ken Berry, Bert Convy and Jo Anne Worley, has died. He was 85. Barnes died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles of complications from Alzheimer's disease, said his longtime partner, Richard T. Jordan. A Los Angeles native and UCLA theater arts graduate, Barnes earned a reputation as "The Revue Master of Hollywood" after hitting his stride in 1958 with "The Billy Barnes Revue" at the Las Palmas Theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Digby Wolfe, an Emmy Award-winning comedy writer who helped producer George Schlatter develop "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In," a landmark TV series that became an overnight sensation in the late 1960s, has died. He was 82. Wolfe, who later became a professor of writing at the University of New Mexico, died of lung cancer Wednesday at his home in Albuquerque, said his wife, Patricia Mannion-Wolfe. The British-born Wolfe - an actor, writer, singer and comedian whose early career included writing for the BBC's satirical "That Was the Week That Was" and hosting an Australian TV variety show - moved to Los Angeles in the mid-'60s.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The West Hollywood home of actor Alan Sues, who portrayed several wacky characters on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" starting in the late 1960s, is on the market at $1.175 million. The Spanish-style house, built in 1927, is entered through a gated courtyard with a fountain. The 1,830 square feet of living space includes a wood-beam ceiling in the living room, two bedrooms and two bathrooms. The backyard contains a koi pond, a gazebo and a brick patio. Sues, who died in December at 85, appeared onstage and in film as well as television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carl Rowan, a prize-winning journalist and former diplomat who overcame the repression and racism of the deep South to become a leading voice for black America, died early Saturday. He was 75. Rowan died of natural causes in the intensive care unit of Washington Hospital Center, said hospital spokesman LeRoy Tillman. Although he served in the administrations of both John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson in the 1960s, Rowan's greatest prominence in the last three decades came as a journalist.
WORLD
March 17, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams announced Friday that he would step down at year's end after a decade of leading the worldwide Anglican Communion at a time of continued controversy over the role of women and gays and lesbians in the church. Williams, 61, said it had been a privilege to serve as head of a communion that includes the Episcopal Church in the United States. But he has decided to take up a position as master of Magdalene College at Cambridge University, a return to the world of academia in which many say the bookish cleric has always felt most at home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Alan Sues, the actor best known as a flamboyantly campy regular on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" in the late 1960s and early '70s, has died. He was 85. Sues died Thursday night while watching television at his home in West Hollywood, said Michael Gregg Michaud, a longtime friend. "He had been in failing health the last couple of years, but it was nothing you could put your finger on; just old age," said Michaud. "Mentally, he was funny and 'on' as usual. He was a delightfully funny man, with a wonderful career that spanned six decades.
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