Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRowan Atkinson
IN THE NEWS

Rowan Atkinson

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
If British comedian Rowan Atkinson had any doubts about his international appeal, they've been put to rest by stories he keeps hearing from English aid workers returning from trips to Africa. "They go to these African villages where there are four thatched huts," said Atkinson, 56. "There is nobody in any of them except one, where the entire village is crammed in there. There's a tiny black-and-white TV set being powered by a car battery, and there's a 'Mr. Bean' VHS tape being played.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Like any international spy movie worth its salt, "Johnny English Reborn" boasts helicopter stunts, exotic locations, choreographed fighting and nifty gadgets. But because this is a comedy starring gifted British comic actor Rowan Atkinson, what's more memorable (and hilariously so) is the simplest form of decorum-puncturing mayhem: an adjustable office chair that won't stop adjusting during a meeting with the prime minister. Atkinson's agent acts as if nothing untoward is happening in a sequence that's entirely reminiscent of his forebear Peter Sellers staring at that ever-unrolling toilet paper in "The Party.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2003 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
The eyes bulge like a man about to explode. The jaw is sunken and charmless like the loneliest guy at a dance. He scrunches himself up and leans forward to sip a cup of breakfast tea, then rubs his close-cropped hair with the flat of his hand, not unlike a cat grooming itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
If British comedian Rowan Atkinson had any doubts about his international appeal, they've been put to rest by stories he keeps hearing from English aid workers returning from trips to Africa. "They go to these African villages where there are four thatched huts," said Atkinson, 56. "There is nobody in any of them except one, where the entire village is crammed in there. There's a tiny black-and-white TV set being powered by a car battery, and there's a 'Mr. Bean' VHS tape being played.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
If looks could actually kill, Rowan Atkinson's face would have to be licensed as a deadly weapon. Which would be fortunate for the character he plays, a British secret agent who is not awfully good with more conventional instruments of espionage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2004 | From Associated Press
Actor and comedian Rowan Atkinson accepted undisclosed damages and a public apology Thursday from newspapers that had alleged he was suffering from depression and on the edge of a nervous breakdown. The 49-year-old star of "The Black Adder" and "Mr. Bean" attended London's High Court for the settlement of his libel action against Associated Newspapers over articles in the Mail on Sunday and the Daily Mail in December 2003 and January 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1998 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In all the current talk about which films are Oscar favorites, few people would argue that "Bean," the madcap comedy starring Rowan Atkinson, was 1997's most significant movie. But its producers, Eric Fellner and Tim Bevan, make a strong case for it--a case that has nothing to do with the merits of "Bean" as a film.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1997 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You know that cliche about funny men who turn out to be morose or profoundly serious in real life, when they're not performing? Well, British comic Rowan Atkinson is the living embodiment of the type. Americans know Atkinson best as Mr. Bean, the bewildered, manic and virtually mute man with a face that contorts like rubber. Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Like any international spy movie worth its salt, "Johnny English Reborn" boasts helicopter stunts, exotic locations, choreographed fighting and nifty gadgets. But because this is a comedy starring gifted British comic actor Rowan Atkinson, what's more memorable (and hilariously so) is the simplest form of decorum-puncturing mayhem: an adjustable office chair that won't stop adjusting during a meeting with the prime minister. Atkinson's agent acts as if nothing untoward is happening in a sequence that's entirely reminiscent of his forebear Peter Sellers staring at that ever-unrolling toilet paper in "The Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
British comedian Rowan Atkinson's latest film, "Johnny English Reborn," doesn't hit theaters in the U.S. until late October. But Universal Pictures, the studio behind the picture, already has something to celebrate: This weekend, the movie opened in 15 foreign countries and grossed $11.7 million. That's the biggest opening weekend ever for a movie starring Atkinson, known to most for his portrayal of Mr. Bean, the earnest but often uncouth character he's played on both television and the big screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
British comedian Rowan Atkinson's latest film, "Johnny English Reborn," doesn't hit theaters in the U.S. until late October. But Universal Pictures, the studio behind the picture, already has something to celebrate: This weekend, the movie opened in 15 foreign countries and grossed $11.7 million. That's the biggest opening weekend ever for a movie starring Atkinson, known to most for his portrayal of Mr. Bean, the earnest but often uncouth character he's played on both television and the big screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2004 | From Associated Press
Actor and comedian Rowan Atkinson accepted undisclosed damages and a public apology Thursday from newspapers that had alleged he was suffering from depression and on the edge of a nervous breakdown. The 49-year-old star of "The Black Adder" and "Mr. Bean" attended London's High Court for the settlement of his libel action against Associated Newspapers over articles in the Mail on Sunday and the Daily Mail in December 2003 and January 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
If looks could actually kill, Rowan Atkinson's face would have to be licensed as a deadly weapon. Which would be fortunate for the character he plays, a British secret agent who is not awfully good with more conventional instruments of espionage.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
Everyone concerned with a studio movie in the hyper-competitive summer season gets distinctly nervous as release date nears. The financial stakes are so high that films need to gross at least $100 million as a baseline for box-office credibility. No wonder then that the people closest to "Johnny English," starring Rowan Atkinson, can afford the luxury of looking distinctly relaxed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2003 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
The eyes bulge like a man about to explode. The jaw is sunken and charmless like the loneliest guy at a dance. He scrunches himself up and leans forward to sip a cup of breakfast tea, then rubs his close-cropped hair with the flat of his hand, not unlike a cat grooming itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1998 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In all the current talk about which films are Oscar favorites, few people would argue that "Bean," the madcap comedy starring Rowan Atkinson, was 1997's most significant movie. But its producers, Eric Fellner and Tim Bevan, make a strong case for it--a case that has nothing to do with the merits of "Bean" as a film.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
Everyone concerned with a studio movie in the hyper-competitive summer season gets distinctly nervous as release date nears. The financial stakes are so high that films need to gross at least $100 million as a baseline for box-office credibility. No wonder then that the people closest to "Johnny English," starring Rowan Atkinson, can afford the luxury of looking distinctly relaxed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2003
Re "Using Their Bean," by David Gritten, July 13, another brilliant comedy series with Rowan Atkinson is "The Thin Blue Line," about a rigid police inspector and his eclectic mix of fellow officers. Atkinson is a great actor because, like Jennifer Saunders of "Absolutely Famous," he works with a supporting cast of brilliant comedians and is not threatened by their talent. Atkinson, like Saunders, does not have to be the star of the show. Thank you! Nancy Teel Mission Viejo
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1997 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You know that cliche about funny men who turn out to be morose or profoundly serious in real life, when they're not performing? Well, British comic Rowan Atkinson is the living embodiment of the type. Americans know Atkinson best as Mr. Bean, the bewildered, manic and virtually mute man with a face that contorts like rubber. Mr.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|