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Rowan Williams

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WORLD
July 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
Welsh Archbishop Rowan Williams, a renowned theologian and outspoken opponent of U.S. policies on Afghanistan and Iraq, was chosen Tuesday to be the 104th archbishop of Canterbury, spiritual leader of the world's more than 70 million Anglicans. Williams, whose selection was made by British Prime Minister Tony Blair and confirmed by Queen Elizabeth II, succeeds the Rev. George Carey, who plans to retire Oct. 31 after 11 years.
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WORLD
March 17, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams announced Friday that he would step down at year's end after a decade of leading the worldwide Anglican Communion at a time of continued controversy over the role of women and gays and lesbians in the church. Williams, 61, said it had been a privilege to serve as head of a communion that includes the Episcopal Church in the United States. But he has decided to take up a position as master of Magdalene College at Cambridge University, a return to the world of academia in which many say the bookish cleric has always felt most at home.
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WORLD
October 21, 2009 | Washington Post
In a remarkable bid to attract disillusioned members of the Anglican Communion, the Vatican announced Tuesday that it would establish a special arrangement that would allow Anglicans to join the Catholic Church while preserving their liturgy and spiritual heritage, including married priests. The worldwide Anglican Communion, which includes the 2.3 million-member U.S. Episcopal Church, has been racked by years of conflict over the interpretation of Scripture that has led to clashes over female clergy and, recently, the rights of gays to serve as clergy.
WORLD
October 21, 2009 | Washington Post
In a remarkable bid to attract disillusioned members of the Anglican Communion, the Vatican announced Tuesday that it would establish a special arrangement that would allow Anglicans to join the Catholic Church while preserving their liturgy and spiritual heritage, including married priests. The worldwide Anglican Communion, which includes the 2.3 million-member U.S. Episcopal Church, has been racked by years of conflict over the interpretation of Scripture that has led to clashes over female clergy and, recently, the rights of gays to serve as clergy.
WORLD
February 12, 2008 | Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writer
The archbishop of Canterbury on Monday defended himself against a firestorm of recent criticism, telling fellow Anglicans his statement last week that Britain would have to accept some limited form of Islamic law had been misunderstood. Speaking to a gathering of elected representatives from the Church of England, Archbishop Rowan Williams said he took full responsibility "for any unclarity . . . and for any misleading choice of words that has helped cause distress or misunderstanding."
WORLD
March 17, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams announced Friday that he would step down at year's end after a decade of leading the worldwide Anglican Communion at a time of continued controversy over the role of women and gays and lesbians in the church. Williams, 61, said it had been a privilege to serve as head of a communion that includes the Episcopal Church in the United States. But he has decided to take up a position as master of Magdalene College at Cambridge University, a return to the world of academia in which many say the bookish cleric has always felt most at home.
WORLD
April 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The leader of the world's Anglicans, visiting Canada for a spiritual retreat, said he had agreed to an urgent request for a meeting with U.S. church leaders as the Anglican fellowship nears a split over the Bible and sexuality. Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams said at a Toronto news conference that he would meet with U.S. Episcopal leaders in the fall. Last month, U.S.
WORLD
March 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The spiritual leader of the world's Anglicans does not believe that creationism should be taught in schools. "I don't think it should, actually. No, no," said Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, reflecting on the education debate over religion and science that has divided the United States.
WORLD
June 18, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A Ugandan-born cleric who opposes gay priests in the Anglican church as well as U.S. and British military involvement in Iraq was named an archbishop of the Church of England, the first black man to reach that rank in its 500-year history. The Right Rev. John Sentamu, 56, now bishop of Birmingham, was appointed by the British government as archbishop of York, the church's second-highest position after Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, who leads the worldwide Anglican Communion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The second-ranking bishop in the Church of England declared conditional support for war against Iraq to battle the "forces of evil and wickedness," breaking ranks with the new archbishop of Canterbury. Archbishop of York David Hope, in a television interview, said he believed military action against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's regime could be justified "in the very last resort." Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams is on record opposing military action in Iraq.
WORLD
February 12, 2008 | Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writer
The archbishop of Canterbury on Monday defended himself against a firestorm of recent criticism, telling fellow Anglicans his statement last week that Britain would have to accept some limited form of Islamic law had been misunderstood. Speaking to a gathering of elected representatives from the Church of England, Archbishop Rowan Williams said he took full responsibility "for any unclarity . . . and for any misleading choice of words that has helped cause distress or misunderstanding."
WORLD
July 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
Welsh Archbishop Rowan Williams, a renowned theologian and outspoken opponent of U.S. policies on Afghanistan and Iraq, was chosen Tuesday to be the 104th archbishop of Canterbury, spiritual leader of the world's more than 70 million Anglicans. Williams, whose selection was made by British Prime Minister Tony Blair and confirmed by Queen Elizabeth II, succeeds the Rev. George Carey, who plans to retire Oct. 31 after 11 years.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A powerful Anglican leader from Nigeria installed a bishop to lead the network of conservative U.S. parishes he created, despite a last-minute plea from the archbishop of Canterbury that the Nigerian cancel his visit. Archbishop Peter Akinola of Nigeria was already in the United States when Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams' spokesman revealed that Williams had tried to intercede. The installation ceremony at a nondenominational chapel in Woodbridge, Va.
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