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Roxanna Brown

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2009 | Jason Felch
The U.S. government has agreed to pay $880,000 to the estate of Roxanna Brown, the 62-year-old Southeast Asia scholar who died in federal custody last year. Brown was arrested in May 2008 amid a federal investigation into donations of allegedly looted Thai antiquities to four Southern California museums. Four days later, while awaiting a court hearing, Brown suffered a perforated ulcer and died in her cell at a federal detention center in Seattle.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2009 | Jason Felch
The U.S. government has agreed to pay $880,000 to the estate of Roxanna Brown, the 62-year-old Southeast Asia scholar who died in federal custody last year. Brown was arrested in May 2008 amid a federal investigation into donations of allegedly looted Thai antiquities to four Southern California museums. Four days later, while awaiting a court hearing, Brown suffered a perforated ulcer and died in her cell at a federal detention center in Seattle.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2008 | Jason Felch, Times Staff Writer
Roxanna Brown never saw the car that hit her. The 36-year-old expert in Southeast Asian art was pulling her motorcycle out of a parking lot in Bangkok when the vehicle knocked her onto a busy road. There she was repeatedly crushed under the wheels of a multi-ton rice truck. Then the truck driver backed up, apparently intending to roll over her again. He was trying to avoid a lawsuit by finishing her off, she would later tell friends, but passersby pulled her out of the way. The 1982 accident was the latest turn in an exotic life tinged by hardship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2008 | Jason Felch, Times Staff Writer
On a March visit to the United States from her adopted home in Thailand, antiquities scholar Roxanna Brown met her brother for lunch in Santa Monica. Roxanna was broke, Fred Brown recalled. She seemed nervous. For years, she'd chosen to live on a modest salary in a village outside Bangkok, despite her reputation as one of the world's leading experts on Southeast Asian ceramics. Now 61, she said she could no longer afford the $400 a month she'd been sending to support their 90-year-old mother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2008 | Jason Felch, Times Staff Writer
On a March visit to the United States from her adopted home in Thailand, antiquities scholar Roxanna Brown met her brother for lunch in Santa Monica. Roxanna was broke, Fred Brown recalled. She seemed nervous. For years, she'd chosen to live on a modest salary in a village outside Bangkok, despite her reputation as one of the world's leading experts on Southeast Asian ceramics. Now 61, she said she could no longer afford the $400 a month she'd been sending to support their 90-year-old mother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2008 | Jason Felch, Times Staff Writer
'I'm being arrested." Roxanna Brown, a renowned expert in Southeast Asian ceramics, was whispering into the hotel telephone. Downstairs in the lobby, her host, University of Washington professor Bill Lavely, didn't know what to do. He had flown Brown, a 62-year-old museum director, in from Bangkok to give a lecture at an academic conference in Seattle. Lavely paced the lobby for 10 minutes before going up to Brown's room and knocking tentatively on her door. A few minutes later, she emerged, flanked by four federal agents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2008 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
An internationally known expert on Asian art who was implicated in a scheme to smuggle looted antiquities from Thailand to Los Angeles-area museums died Wednesday at a federal detention center in Seattle four days after being arrested there on a visit from Bangkok. Roxanna Brown, 62, director of the Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum at Bangkok University, had traveled to Seattle for a speaking engagement at the University of Washington, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2013 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
When hundreds of federal agents raided four Southern California museums early one January morning in 2008, it set the art world ablaze, suggesting that even amid an international looting scandal, museums had continued to do business with the black market in stolen antiquities. Acting on evidence gathered during a five-year undercover probe, investigators seized more than 10,000 artifacts at the museums and more than half a dozen other locations in California and Illinois. The objects had allegedly been illegally excavated from sites across Southeast Asia, smuggled into Los Angeles and donated to the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, the Pacific Asia Museum in Pasadena, the Mingei Museum in San Diego and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, according to search warrant affidavits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2008 | Jason Felch, Times Staff Writer
Roxanna Brown never saw the car that hit her. The 36-year-old expert in Southeast Asian art was pulling her motorcycle out of a parking lot in Bangkok when the vehicle knocked her onto a busy road. There she was repeatedly crushed under the wheels of a multi-ton rice truck. Then the truck driver backed up, apparently intending to roll over her again. He was trying to avoid a lawsuit by finishing her off, she would later tell friends, but passersby pulled her out of the way. The 1982 accident was the latest turn in an exotic life tinged by hardship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2008 | Jason Felch, Times Staff Writer
'I'm being arrested." Roxanna Brown, a renowned expert in Southeast Asian ceramics, was whispering into the hotel telephone. Downstairs in the lobby, her host, University of Washington professor Bill Lavely, didn't know what to do. He had flown Brown, a 62-year-old museum director, in from Bangkok to give a lecture at an academic conference in Seattle. Lavely paced the lobby for 10 minutes before going up to Brown's room and knocking tentatively on her door. A few minutes later, she emerged, flanked by four federal agents.
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