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Roxie Campanella

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2004 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Roxie Campanella, the widow of Dodger Hall of Fame catcher Roy Campanella and a tireless advocate for victims of spinal cord injury, died of cancer Sunday at her Woodland Hills home. She was 77. Although Roy Campanella never played a game for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Roxie Campanella was a beloved presence at Dodger Stadium. Roy Campanella was paralyzed in an automobile accident in January 1958, after the Dodgers completed their final season in Brooklyn.
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SPORTS
March 27, 2004
I just read the touching story by Bill Plaschke about the passing of Roxie Campanella [March 23]. I have been an usher at Dodger Stadium for the past five years. During this time, it has been my distinct pleasure to not only meet this positive, upbeat, and inspirational lady, but to have had numerous discussions with her about Roy, the Dodgers, baseball, and best of all, life in general. She came not only to enjoy the game but to spread her warmth with all of us. Despite the decline in health, Roxie would always arrive with her smile and her gentle voice.
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SPORTS
September 29, 1999 | DEVRA MAZA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Roxie Campanella can see her husband's picture from her club-level seats next to the press box in Dodger Stadium. Roy Campanella is one of the Dodger greats whose retired number and image adorn the outfield wall. Though it has been six years since Campy's death, his widow, Roxie, still goes to every Dodger home game and sits in the seats they shared in his lifetime. "This has been part of my life for a long, long time," Roxie says.
SPORTS
March 23, 2004 | Bill Plaschke
For four decades, figuratively and literally, with an elegant smile that hid an unimaginable strain, she carried their catcher. On Monday, the Dodgers tearfully did the same for her. Former players and executives filled a Forest Lawn chapel to honor a teammate who played every day, played with passion, and played in pain. Her name was Roxie Campanella, and, wherever she is today, here's hoping she and Roy are dancing. "They're back together again," said Don Newcombe.
SPORTS
March 27, 2004
I just read the touching story by Bill Plaschke about the passing of Roxie Campanella [March 23]. I have been an usher at Dodger Stadium for the past five years. During this time, it has been my distinct pleasure to not only meet this positive, upbeat, and inspirational lady, but to have had numerous discussions with her about Roy, the Dodgers, baseball, and best of all, life in general. She came not only to enjoy the game but to spread her warmth with all of us. Despite the decline in health, Roxie would always arrive with her smile and her gentle voice.
SPORTS
March 23, 2004 | Bill Plaschke
For four decades, figuratively and literally, with an elegant smile that hid an unimaginable strain, she carried their catcher. On Monday, the Dodgers tearfully did the same for her. Former players and executives filled a Forest Lawn chapel to honor a teammate who played every day, played with passion, and played in pain. Her name was Roxie Campanella, and, wherever she is today, here's hoping she and Roy are dancing. "They're back together again," said Don Newcombe.
SPORTS
June 29, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON
Roy Campanella's funeral service--scheduled to be held this week--will be private, at the request of his family, the Dodgers said Monday. Campanella died of a heart attack Saturday night at his home in Woodland Hills. He was 71. Scheduled to speak at the service are Mayor Tom Bradley, Dodger Manager Tom Lasorda, former Dodger pitcher Joe Black and Dodger broadcaster Vin Scul- ly. Black and Lasorda were teammates of Campan- ella when Scully began his announcing career with the Dodgers in 1950.
SPORTS
August 13, 2003 | Bill Plaschke
It used to be home. But when Roxie Campanella attempted to enter the bowels of Dodger Stadium for a pregame chat with old friend Dusty Baker last weekend, she was stopped by security guards. "They didn't seem to know who I was, or what I was," she said. She explained that she was the widow of a Hall of Fame Dodger named Roy Campanella. The guards shrugged.
SPORTS
September 21, 2000 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dodgers' pursuit of the National League West title officially ended Wednesday. San Francisco eliminated them by defeating Cincinnati. But the Dodgers still managed to keep alive their faint wild-card hopes with their second consecutive 1-0 victory over the Arizona Diamondbacks in front of 31,630 at Dodger Stadium. Eric Karros led off the bottom of the ninth by slamming a 2-0 pitch off Arizona reliever Byung-Hyun Kim (6-6) into the Dodger bullpen in left field.
SPORTS
July 17, 1993 | TIM KAWAKAMI
In a pregame tribute to Don Drysdale and Roy Campanella, Campanella's widow, Roxie, stirred the crowd with an emotional tribute to her husband, who was confined more than 30 years to a wheelchair. "I tried so hard to keep him here as long as I could," she said, her voice shaking as Don Newcombe moved forward to hold her. "But God wanted him, and took him away. "But he is happy now because he is walking, something he always wanted to do."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2004 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Roxie Campanella, the widow of Dodger Hall of Fame catcher Roy Campanella and a tireless advocate for victims of spinal cord injury, died of cancer Sunday at her Woodland Hills home. She was 77. Although Roy Campanella never played a game for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Roxie Campanella was a beloved presence at Dodger Stadium. Roy Campanella was paralyzed in an automobile accident in January 1958, after the Dodgers completed their final season in Brooklyn.
SPORTS
September 29, 1999 | DEVRA MAZA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Roxie Campanella can see her husband's picture from her club-level seats next to the press box in Dodger Stadium. Roy Campanella is one of the Dodger greats whose retired number and image adorn the outfield wall. Though it has been six years since Campy's death, his widow, Roxie, still goes to every Dodger home game and sits in the seats they shared in his lifetime. "This has been part of my life for a long, long time," Roxie says.
SPORTS
November 3, 1999
A look at upcoming tournaments in the region or major events involving top regional players. * 8: Myron McNamara Memorial Tournament, Los Serranos Golf and Country Club, honors former UC Irvine men's tennis coach who led Anteaters to six NCAA Division II team titles and benefits the Irvine men's program. Fee is $150. Information: (949) 824-8366. * 8: Darrell Jackson Celebrity Golf Tournament. Rio Hondo Golf Club, Downey. Fee is $150. Benefits Exchange Club Child Abuse Prevention Center.
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