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BUSINESS
May 23, 2003
*the software company that owns Napster, named Mike Bebel president and chief operating officer of the online music service. Bebel, 41, had been president and chief executive of Pressplay, formerly a joint venture between Sony Corp. and Vivendi Universal.
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BUSINESS
July 20, 2004 | Jon Healey
Hoping to curb music piracy on campus, USC and five other universities have signed deals to offer discounted versions this fall of the Napster online music service from Roxio Inc. of Santa Clara, Calif. USC students are expected to be charged about $2 per month for Napster, while the other schools -- Cornell University, George Washington University, Middlebury College, the University of Miami and Wright State University -- are expected to provide it at no additional charge.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 2003 | Joseph Menn
Roxio Inc., the software firm that bought Napster's technology and Web site in bankruptcy proceedings last fall, said it had acquired one more Napster asset -- company founder Shawn Fanning. Roxio said Fanning, 22, would serve as a consultant as the Santa Clara, Calif., firm retools the Internet song-swapping service that shut down in July 2001 during a court fight over copyrights. Chief Executive Chris Gorog said Napster will reopen as a fee-based service with licensed content this year.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Three years ago, it was ludicrous to think that Napster would win the backing of the record labels that were suing it for piracy. So it seemed appropriate that when Roxio Corp. unveiled its new, label-authorized version of Napster here on Thursday, the industry's blessings would be delivered by rapper Ludacris. "To see them come back and do it right, it means the world to the music business," said the rapper, whose latest CD is expected to top next week's sales charts.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2003 | From Reuters
Software company Roxio Inc. reported a larger profit for its fiscal fourth quarter and said it expects a profit in the current quarter, excluding its pending acquisition of an online digital music service. Santa Clara, Calif.-based Roxio reported a net profit for the March quarter of $2.3 million, or 12 cents a share, compared with a year-earlier profit of $340,000, or 2 cents. Analysts surveyed by Thomson First Call expected a profit of 19 cents.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2004 | Jon Healey
Hoping to curb music piracy on campus, USC and five other universities have signed deals to offer discounted versions this fall of the Napster online music service from Roxio Inc. of Santa Clara, Calif. USC students are expected to be charged about $2 per month for Napster, while the other schools -- Cornell University, George Washington University, Middlebury College, the University of Miami and Wright State University -- are expected to provide it at no additional charge.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by a major record label, the leading supplier of CD-recording software is developing technology that lets consumers copy songs onto CDs without encouraging piracy. Roxio Inc. of Milpitas, Calif., is expected to announce today that EMI Recorded Music is investing an undisclosed amount of money in Roxio and its new technology. The goal is to create a simple way to collect an additional fee from consumers who want to make CDs out of the songs they download.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Software maker Roxio Inc. plans to reincarnate the Napster online music service much sooner than expected, launching a legitimate form of the once-dominant piracy hotbed by the end of the year.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2002 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Song-swapping phenomenon Napster Inc. may return from the grave in a form that allows digital songs to be burned onto compact discs and sends payments to copyright holders. Roxio Inc., the top seller of CD-burning software, is expected to be announced today as the favored bidder for Napster's technology, the Napster.com domain name and the Napster brand, one of the most widely recognized on the Internet.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Three years ago, it was ludicrous to think that Napster would win the backing of the record labels that were suing it for piracy. So it seemed appropriate that when Roxio Corp. unveiled its new, label-authorized version of Napster here on Thursday, the industry's blessings would be delivered by rapper Ludacris. "To see them come back and do it right, it means the world to the music business," said the rapper, whose latest CD is expected to top next week's sales charts.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Software maker Roxio Inc. plans to reincarnate the Napster online music service much sooner than expected, launching a legitimate form of the once-dominant piracy hotbed by the end of the year.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2003
*the software company that owns Napster, named Mike Bebel president and chief operating officer of the online music service. Bebel, 41, had been president and chief executive of Pressplay, formerly a joint venture between Sony Corp. and Vivendi Universal.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2003 | From Reuters
Software company Roxio Inc. reported a larger profit for its fiscal fourth quarter and said it expects a profit in the current quarter, excluding its pending acquisition of an online digital music service. Santa Clara, Calif.-based Roxio reported a net profit for the March quarter of $2.3 million, or 12 cents a share, compared with a year-earlier profit of $340,000, or 2 cents. Analysts surveyed by Thomson First Call expected a profit of 19 cents.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2003 | Joseph Menn
Roxio Inc., the software firm that bought Napster's technology and Web site in bankruptcy proceedings last fall, said it had acquired one more Napster asset -- company founder Shawn Fanning. Roxio said Fanning, 22, would serve as a consultant as the Santa Clara, Calif., firm retools the Internet song-swapping service that shut down in July 2001 during a court fight over copyrights. Chief Executive Chris Gorog said Napster will reopen as a fee-based service with licensed content this year.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2002 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Song-swapping phenomenon Napster Inc. may return from the grave in a form that allows digital songs to be burned onto compact discs and sends payments to copyright holders. Roxio Inc., the top seller of CD-burning software, is expected to be announced today as the favored bidder for Napster's technology, the Napster.com domain name and the Napster brand, one of the most widely recognized on the Internet.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by a major record label, the leading supplier of CD-recording software is developing technology that lets consumers copy songs onto CDs without encouraging piracy. Roxio Inc. of Milpitas, Calif., is expected to announce today that EMI Recorded Music is investing an undisclosed amount of money in Roxio and its new technology. The goal is to create a simple way to collect an additional fee from consumers who want to make CDs out of the songs they download.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2004 | From Associated Press
Napster has struck an agreement with the U.S. government to offer its online music download service to members of the military and their families at a reduced price. As part of the arrangement with the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, Napster agreed to discount the price of its song downloads and subscription service by 10%. Napster, owned by Santa Clara, Calif.-based software maker Roxio Inc., normally sells individual song downloads for 99 cents, full albums starting at $9.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Roxio Inc., owner of the Napster Internet music service, said fiscal first-quarter sales of song downloads and CD duplication software exceeded the company's estimates. Roxio in May had forecast revenue for the quarter ended in June would increase about 16% to $28 million -- $21 million from software and $7 million from Napster. Sales of both exceeded those estimates, Santa Clara, Calif.-based Roxio said, without being specific. Shares of Roxio rose 24 cents to $4.50 on Nasdaq.
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