Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoy Bullock
IN THE NEWS

Roy Bullock

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 21, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Bullock, the controversial West Coast investigator for the Anti-Defamation League, said Tuesday that he infiltrated about 30 political groups as part of his duties but never did anything dishonest or underhanded. In his first detailed press interview, Bullock acknowledged that it was a mistake for him to sell information on the side to South Africa--including a report on liberal Rep. Ron Dellums (D-Berkeley). "It was not the most political thing to do," he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tom Gerard, the former police officer arrested upon his return from the Philippines in a spying controversy here, was charged with four counts of stealing government documents and one count of conspiracy. Gerard, 50, is to be arraigned Wednesday. He is accused of leaking confidential police intelligence files to Roy Bullock, a longtime investigator for the Anti-Defamation League. The two men also are suspected of selling information to the government of South Africa.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tom Gerard, the former police officer arrested upon his return from the Philippines in a spying controversy here, was charged with four counts of stealing government documents and one count of conspiracy. Gerard, 50, is to be arraigned Wednesday. He is accused of leaking confidential police intelligence files to Roy Bullock, a longtime investigator for the Anti-Defamation League. The two men also are suspected of selling information to the government of South Africa.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas J. Gerard, the former San Francisco police officer who fled here after being accused of passing confidential files to the Anti-Defamation League, enjoyed a private prank as he traveled the world for the Central Intelligence Agency. Among the many passports and other fake identity papers that he used as an undercover CIA agent from 1982 through 1985 were five documents identifying him as Thomas P. Clouseau--as in Inspector Clouseau, the bumbling French detective in the Pink Panther films.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mounting their first detailed defense against allegations of illegal spying, officials of the Anti-Defamation League sought Friday to distance themselves from a controversial longtime investigator but acknowledged they were still paying him because he is "damn good." Barbara S.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the outside world, Roy Bullock was a small-time art dealer who operated from his house in the Castro District. In reality, he was an undercover spy who picked through garbage and amassed secret files for the Anti-Defamation League for nearly 40 years. His code name at the prominent Jewish organization was Cal, and he was so successful at infiltrating political groups that he was once chosen to head an Arab-American delegation that visited Rep.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police on Thursday served search warrants on the Anti-Defamation League here and in Los Angeles, seizing evidence of a nationwide intelligence network accused of keeping files on more than 950 political groups, newspapers and labor unions and as many as 12,000 people.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas J. Gerard, the former San Francisco police officer who fled here after being accused of passing confidential files to the Anti-Defamation League, enjoyed a private prank as he traveled the world for the Central Intelligence Agency. Among the many passports and other fake identity papers that he used as an undercover CIA agent from 1982 through 1985 were five documents identifying him as Thomas P. Clouseau--as in Inspector Clouseau, the bumbling French detective in the Pink Panther films.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Arab-American groups filed damage claims Thursday against police and sheriff's agencies in Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego in connection with allegations that confidential police information was provided to the Anti-Defamation League. The claims are legally required before the groups--including the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee and the National Assn.
NEWS
April 30, 1994 | Associated Press
A judge dismissed criminal charges Friday against a former San Francisco policeman accused of conspiring to gather secret files on thousands of political activists. Municipal Court Judge J. Dominique Olcomendy cited the refusal of the FBI, which initially investigated the case, to turn over all its records on former Detective Thomas Gerard. The withheld records may include material essential to Gerard's defense, the judge said.
NEWS
April 21, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Bullock, the controversial West Coast investigator for the Anti-Defamation League, said Tuesday that he infiltrated about 30 political groups as part of his duties but never did anything dishonest or underhanded. In his first detailed press interview, Bullock acknowledged that it was a mistake for him to sell information on the side to South Africa--including a report on liberal Rep. Ron Dellums (D-Berkeley). "It was not the most political thing to do," he said.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mounting their first detailed defense against allegations of illegal spying, officials of the Anti-Defamation League sought Friday to distance themselves from a controversial longtime investigator but acknowledged they were still paying him because he is "damn good." Barbara S.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the outside world, Roy Bullock was a small-time art dealer who operated from his house in the Castro District. In reality, he was an undercover spy who picked through garbage and amassed secret files for the Anti-Defamation League for nearly 40 years. His code name at the prominent Jewish organization was Cal, and he was so successful at infiltrating political groups that he was once chosen to head an Arab-American delegation that visited Rep.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police on Thursday served search warrants on the Anti-Defamation League here and in Los Angeles, seizing evidence of a nationwide intelligence network accused of keeping files on more than 950 political groups, newspapers and labor unions and as many as 12,000 people.
NEWS
May 28, 1994 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former police officer Tom Gerard, who fled to the Philippines after he was accused of spying for the Anti-Defamation League, pleaded no contest Friday to one charge of illegally accessing police computer records. Gerard's plea brings to a close the spying scandal that rocked the prominent Jewish civil rights group last year and outraged thousands of people and activist groups targeted by the league's private intelligence operation.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Anti-Defamation League defended its record as a civil rights group Friday and said it will cooperate with authorities who are investigating whether the organization collected confidential police information on citizens and groups. But San Francisco Dist. Atty. Arlo Smith said that Anti-Defamation League employees involved in intelligence gathering could face many felony counts of receiving confidential files, eavesdropping, tax violations and conspiracy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|