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Roy Campanella

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September 22, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
Tucked behind flowing pink bougainvillea and thick green shrubs, the Woodland Hills home quietly masks the force of nature that once lived inside. The wide doors are in deference to his wheelchair. The bars on the window are symbolic of his fight. Sitting peacefully on a bookshelf in the dining room is a gold urn containing his ashes. Typically, perfectly, the top and bottom of the container are wrapped in masking tape. Roy Campanella, Lord knows, would do anything to hold himself together.
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SPORTS
May 10, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
We recently asked you to list your choices for the 10 greatest Dodgers of all time, and vote you did, as we received an amazing 12,231 ballots. So many people voted that we have decided to expand the list from the top 10 to the top 20. Each weekday at 11 a.m. PDT, a new person will be listed as we count down all 20. Remember, any Dodger, Brooklyn or L.A., was eligible, including managers, owners, announcers, etc. Points were assigned based on where you listed the person on the ballot.
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SPORTS
January 6, 1990
Roy Campanella, the Dodgers' former Hall of Fame catcher and a member of the club's community services department since 1978, is in serious condition at Northridge Hospital with pneumonia and diabetes complications, a hospital spokeswoman said Friday. Campanella, 68, was admitted to the hospital Dec. 30 and has been on a respiratory machine to assist his breathing.
SPORTS
September 26, 2012 | By Dylan Hernandez
SAN DIEGO -- Catcher A.J. Ellis won the seventh annual Roy Campanella Award, which is given to the Dodgers player who best exemplifies the spirit and leadership of the late Hall of Fame catcher. The award was voted on by Dodgers players and coaches. Ellis will be presented with the award on Saturday at Dodger Stadium by Campanella's daughter, Joni Campanella Roan. Ellis is 31 years old but in his first full season as a major leaguer. Ellis ranks fourth in the major leagues with 125 games caught.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011 | By Russ Stanton, Los Angeles Times
Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella Neil Lanctot Simon & Schuster: 516 pp., $28 He was a three-time National League most valuable player, an eight-time All-Star, and played in five World Series, but Roy Campanella was something else when the Dodgers began playing in Los Angeles in 1958. He was a quadriplegic, his body broken in a tragic automobile accident after the 1957 season. Few Dodgers fans in Los Angeles ever had a chance to fully appreciate the Hall of Fame catcher in action, but Neil Lanctot's rich new biography, "Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella," should change that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1993 | SUE REILLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many mourned the recent passing of Dodger Hall of Fame catcher Roy Campanella, who lived in Woodland Hills for the past 15 years. None mourned more than John Campanella of Lancaster. He's the man that the crippled, former baseball player adopted when John was a 12-year-old boy in Brooklyn. Campanella says life with his famous father was a learning experience marked by dignity and love. "My Pop spent the years after his crippling (auto) accident raising his family and working with young people.
SPORTS
February 26, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story of Roy Campanella, one that begins with the legs and ends in the heart, is most visible in the hands. He is paralyzed from the neck down, but Campanella will shake your hand. Next time you see him at a Dodger game, just ask him. He will be staring at the field and talking as if any minute he will be summoned out of that wheelchair to pinch-hit, but don't be afraid. The children aren't.
SPORTS
June 17, 1985 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
Roy Campanella, the Brooklyn Dodgers' Hall of Fame catcher who was named the National League's most valuable player three times in the 1950s, has been in a wheelchair for as long as the Dodgers have been in Los Angeles. The automobile he was driving hit a tree near Brooklyn on a rainy morning in January, 1958, breaking his neck and paralyzing him from the waist down. That week some of the other Boys of Summer had worked out in Los Angeles for the first time. They opened here in April.
SPORTS
February 21, 1990
Roy Campanella, the Hall of Fame catcher hospitalized since Dec. 30 because of complications from diabetes, underwent surgery at Northridge Hospital Medical Center for the removal of gallstones.
SPORTS
January 12, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jackie Robinson, Roy Campanella, Cheryl Miller, Oscar Johnson and Dr. Aaron Wade will be the first inductees into the Los Angeles Black Sports Hall of Fame tonight at the Ebony Showcase Theatre.
SPORTS
July 19, 2012 | By Jack Cavanaugh
GREENWICH, Conn. — Three months shy of his 97th birthday, Mike Sandlock, the Dodgers' oldest living former player — and baseball's oldest living former catcher — can still hit a tee shot almost 200 yards and is fit enough to drive himself about four miles to the 7 a.m. Sunday Mass at the Holy Name Roman Catholic Church in nearby Stamford. His father did the same with the Sandlock family of five in the 1920s — in a horse and wagon. "We'd all pile in for the 10-minute ride," Sandlock said recently.
SPORTS
September 20, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
Matt Kemp , whose priorities were questioned by club officials as recently as a year ago, was voted by his teammates as the winner of the Roy Campanella Award as the Dodgers' most inspirational player. "I'm surprised," Kemp said. He shouldn't be. Kemp, who will be presented the award by the daughter of the late catcher in a pregame ceremony Wednesday night, has played in 356 consecutive games, the longest active streak in the major leagues. "I've always wanted to play every single day," said Kemp, one of the leading candidates to win the National League's most-valuable-player award.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011 | By Russ Stanton, Los Angeles Times
Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella Neil Lanctot Simon & Schuster: 516 pp., $28 He was a three-time National League most valuable player, an eight-time All-Star, and played in five World Series, but Roy Campanella was something else when the Dodgers began playing in Los Angeles in 1958. He was a quadriplegic, his body broken in a tragic automobile accident after the 1957 season. Few Dodgers fans in Los Angeles ever had a chance to fully appreciate the Hall of Fame catcher in action, but Neil Lanctot's rich new biography, "Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella," should change that.
SPORTS
September 22, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
Tucked behind flowing pink bougainvillea and thick green shrubs, the Woodland Hills home quietly masks the force of nature that once lived inside. The wide doors are in deference to his wheelchair. The bars on the window are symbolic of his fight. Sitting peacefully on a bookshelf in the dining room is a gold urn containing his ashes. Typically, perfectly, the top and bottom of the container are wrapped in masking tape. Roy Campanella, Lord knows, would do anything to hold himself together.
SPORTS
February 25, 2008 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Kevin Johnson no longer plays in the NBA, but he can still dish out an assist. He demonstrated he still has that ability after being presented with the John R. Wooden Lifetime Achievement Award at the 17th annual Paralysis Project of America Sports Legends dinner Saturday night at the Omni Hotel. Introduced by Joanie Campanella, daughter of the late Roy Campanella, Johnson said: "I'm from Sacramento, not L.A., I played at UC Berkeley, not UCLA, and for the Phoenix Suns, not the Lakers."
SPORTS
March 23, 2004 | Bill Plaschke
For four decades, figuratively and literally, with an elegant smile that hid an unimaginable strain, she carried their catcher. On Monday, the Dodgers tearfully did the same for her. Former players and executives filled a Forest Lawn chapel to honor a teammate who played every day, played with passion, and played in pain. Her name was Roxie Campanella, and, wherever she is today, here's hoping she and Roy are dancing. "They're back together again," said Don Newcombe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2004 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Roxie Campanella, the widow of Dodger Hall of Fame catcher Roy Campanella and a tireless advocate for victims of spinal cord injury, died of cancer Sunday at her Woodland Hills home. She was 77. Although Roy Campanella never played a game for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Roxie Campanella was a beloved presence at Dodger Stadium. Roy Campanella was paralyzed in an automobile accident in January 1958, after the Dodgers completed their final season in Brooklyn.
SPORTS
February 20, 2004 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Sometimes it pays to keep the little things. After the Brooklyn Dodgers had beaten the New York Yankees in the 1955 World Series, Dodger catcher Roy Campanella gave pitcher Clem Labine his mitt. "I told Roy I was having trouble finding anyone to catch for me during the off-season because I didn't have a catcher's mitt," Labine said from his home in Vero Beach, Fla., Thursday. "So Roy gave me his."
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