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Roy Decarava

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
"Roy DeCarava: A Retrospective" is one of those rare and exciting exhibitions that make you slap your forehead in wonderment that you haven't been intimately acquainted with his quietly powerful work all along. He's been showing his richly printed, visually acute, emotionally touching photographs since 1947, but mostly in New York, where he was born and has lived almost all his life (he turns 77 on Dec. 9).
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2009 | Mary Rourke
Roy DeCarava, an art photographer whose pictures of everyday life in Harlem helped clarify the African American experience for a wider audience, has died. He was 89.He died Tuesday in New York City, his daughter Wendy DeCarava said. The cause was not given. DeCarava (pronounced Dee-cuh-RAH-vah) photographed Harlem during the 1940s, '50s and '60s with an insider's view of the subway stations, restaurants, apartments and especially the people who lived in the predominantly African American neighborhood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996 | Steve Appleford, Steve Appleford is a Los Angeles-based writer and photographer
The images on the wall behind photographer Roy DeCarava are confoundingly simple: a woman strolls across an empty street, dirty dishes gather on a dark cafe table, an intense young boy leans against a pole on a hot summer day. Small, but deeply human, moments. DeCarava has spent half a century making photographs like these on the streets of New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
"Roy DeCarava: A Retrospective" is one of those rare and exciting exhibitions that make you slap your forehead in wonderment that you haven't been intimately acquainted with his quietly powerful work all along. He's been showing his richly printed, visually acute, emotionally touching photographs since 1947, but mostly in New York, where he was born and has lived almost all his life (he turns 77 on Dec. 9).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996
Photographer Roy DeCarava, known for documenting the emotional history of the African American community in Harlem and other parts of New York, will lecture in conjunction with the opening of "Roy DeCarava: A Retrospective," Thursday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The lecture will begin at 7 p.m. in the museum's Bing Theater, followed by a reception for the artist and a viewing of the exhibition. Business attire and reservations are required: (213) 857-6541.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2009 | Mary Rourke
Roy DeCarava, an art photographer whose pictures of everyday life in Harlem helped clarify the African American experience for a wider audience, has died. He was 89.He died Tuesday in New York City, his daughter Wendy DeCarava said. The cause was not given. DeCarava (pronounced Dee-cuh-RAH-vah) photographed Harlem during the 1940s, '50s and '60s with an insider's view of the subway stations, restaurants, apartments and especially the people who lived in the predominantly African American neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1998 | BRETT JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visitors to Hollywood's John Anson Ford Amphitheatre this summer can take advantage of the facility's new elevator and free non-stacked parking as well as some new or revived programming in the sixth annual Summer Nights at the Ford season. Added to the usual varied bill of local dance and music are three series: Sunday brunch chamber music concerts, Saturday morning storytelling sessions and evening opera and film showcases.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1996
* MUSIC: Split into two chamber orchestras, the L.A. Philharmonic plays different programs, under conductors Joseph Swensen and Jeffrey Kahane, today at 1:30 and 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. . . . Jeannine Wagner conducts the Wagner Ensemble in a program called "Quilting an American Christmas," Sunday at 4 p.m. at the Westwood United Methodist Church. . . . Sunday at 6 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Dying for some super relief from the super hyperbole of Super Bowl week? Here are some best bets on the local cultural and entertainment scene that should offer an absorbing change of pace before and after Sunday's kickoff. Theater: San Diego Repertory Theatre's extended hit musical, "Six Women with Brain Death, or Expiring Minds Want to Know," offers a super diversion. A lunatic tale of information overload in the '80s, the performances are at 8 nightly through Friday, and at 6 and 9:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996 | Steve Appleford, Steve Appleford is a Los Angeles-based writer and photographer
The images on the wall behind photographer Roy DeCarava are confoundingly simple: a woman strolls across an empty street, dirty dishes gather on a dark cafe table, an intense young boy leans against a pole on a hot summer day. Small, but deeply human, moments. DeCarava has spent half a century making photographs like these on the streets of New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996
Photographer Roy DeCarava, known for documenting the emotional history of the African American community in Harlem and other parts of New York, will lecture in conjunction with the opening of "Roy DeCarava: A Retrospective," Thursday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The lecture will begin at 7 p.m. in the museum's Bing Theater, followed by a reception for the artist and a viewing of the exhibition. Business attire and reservations are required: (213) 857-6541.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1986 | ROBERT McDONALD
The exhibition "Roy DeCarava: Between Time" now at the Museum of Photographic Arts in Balboa is one of the most beautiful and unpretentious that the museum has had in some time. It is not a great exhibition of photographs, although there may be some great photographs in it. It is, more importantly, profoundly human and moving--some images are achingly so. The artist's ego does not get in the way of our experience of the art. He eschews becoming the subject of his work and a barrier to it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1996 | LEE HARRIS and SUSAN KING
This Sunday, Fox unveils its first public affairs series and the venerable "60 Minutes" introduces its new commentators. "Fox News Sunday," premiering at 8 a.m. on KTTV-TV Channel 11, promises "a fresh and spirited look at major stories and events of the week." Tony Snow, nationally syndicated columnist for USA Today and the Detroit News, is the host.
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