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September 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Rep. Roy Dyson (D-Md.) said Monday that he has made "mistakes in judgment" while in office and that his former top aide who committed suicide had improperly pocketed campaign funds. Dyson also said he was returning $18,000 in campaign contributions made by officials connected to Unisys Corp., one of several defense contractors under investigation for suspected violations of contract procurement regulations.
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NEWS
September 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Rep. Roy Dyson (D-Md.) said Monday that he has made "mistakes in judgment" while in office and that his former top aide who committed suicide had improperly pocketed campaign funds. Dyson also said he was returning $18,000 in campaign contributions made by officials connected to Unisys Corp., one of several defense contractors under investigation for suspected violations of contract procurement regulations.
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NEWS
May 5, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Roy Dyson (D-Md.) said Wednesday his former top aide killed himself because a newspaper story unfairly "smeared" his reputation by describing his unorthodox relations with young male members of Dyson's office staff. Emerging from two days of seclusion after the death of Thomas M. Pappas, Dyson denied that either he or Pappas was a homosexual and praised his former administrative assistant as "a man of integrity."
NEWS
July 20, 1988 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
In the most sweeping action yet undertaken by a target of the Pentagon bribery and fraud investigation, Unisys Corp., the nation's second-largest computer company and a leading defense contractor, announced a major housecleaning Tuesday. In addition, Unisys disclosed that it faces three unrelated criminal investigations into alleged Pentagon overcharges.
NEWS
May 2, 1988 | EILEEN V. QUIGLEY, Times Staff Writer
Tom Pappas, top aide to Rep. Roy Dyson (D-Md.), apparently jumped to his death Sunday from the 24th floor of the Helmsley Palace Hotel here after a newspaper reported that he had made unconventional demands on male members of Dyson's staff. Pappas, 46, landed on a ledge near the eighth floor about 12:25 p.m., according to James Coleman, a police detective. Police called the death an apparent suicide and said that a note had been found but refused to disclose its contents.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
In an extraordinary move, Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci Tuesday stripped six Pentagon officials who are under suspicion in the military procurement bribery and fraud investigation of all sensitive contracting duties.
NEWS
June 20, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III and former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger were warned of extensive fraud, bribery and theft in the military procurement process more than three years ago and failed to act on the information, two lawmakers charged Sunday. Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) said he learned in April, 1985, of widespread leaking of classified government data from the office of then-Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writers
Members of Congress and acquaintances expressed confusion and sadness Monday over the circumstances that prompted a Maryland congressman's aide to leap to his death from a New York hotel window the day a critical story about him appeared in the Washington Post. In the aftermath of the death of Thomas Pappas, 46, chief aide to Rep. Roy Dyson (D-Md.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
House Armed Services Chairman Les Aspin (D-Wis.) Wednesday called on Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci to impose a moratorium of up to two months on all new contracts awarded to defense firms under suspicion in the current Pentagon procurement fraud scandal.
NEWS
July 20, 1988 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
In the most sweeping action yet undertaken by a target of the Pentagon bribery and fraud investigation, Unisys Corp., the nation's second-largest computer company and a leading defense contractor, announced a major housecleaning Tuesday. In addition, Unisys disclosed that it faces three unrelated criminal investigations into alleged Pentagon overcharges.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | SARA FRITZ and WILLIAM NOTTINGHAM, Times Staff Writers
When a tiny community college in Daytona Beach, Fla., held a golf tournament last May 16, a remarkable number of top executives of giant defense contracting firms came from as far away as New York and contributed up to $5,000 each. The presence of these out-of-town big shots transformed the once locally oriented annual outing, which had never before raised more than $5,000, into a surprisingly lucrative fund-raiser that yielded a $110,000 bonanza for the struggling, two-year college.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
House Armed Services Chairman Les Aspin (D-Wis.) Wednesday called on Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci to impose a moratorium of up to two months on all new contracts awarded to defense firms under suspicion in the current Pentagon procurement fraud scandal.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Operation Ill Wind blew like a hurricane through the homes and offices of Pentagon and defense industry officials over the past two weeks as FBI agents began seizing evidence of what they believe is massive corruption in the $150-billion-a-year Defense Department weapons-buying system. And the investigation is rapidly accumulating a cast of characters almost as vast and varied as the mountains of documents swept up by the FBI.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
In an extraordinary move, Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci Tuesday stripped six Pentagon officials who are under suspicion in the military procurement bribery and fraud investigation of all sensitive contracting duties.
NEWS
June 20, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III and former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger were warned of extensive fraud, bribery and theft in the military procurement process more than three years ago and failed to act on the information, two lawmakers charged Sunday. Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) said he learned in April, 1985, of widespread leaking of classified government data from the office of then-Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr.
NEWS
June 18, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
Federal investigators looking into widespread fraud and bribery in the nation's defense contracting system are now focusing their attention on potential wrongdoing in Congress, where two representatives are suspected of passing inside information, sources said Friday. In addition to Rep. Bill Chappell Jr. (D-Fla.), chairman of the House Appropriations subcommittee on defense, House Armed Services Committee member Roy Dyson (D-Md.) is under investigation, The Times has learned.
NEWS
June 18, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
Federal investigators looking into widespread fraud and bribery in the nation's defense contracting system are now focusing their attention on potential wrongdoing in Congress, where two representatives are suspected of passing inside information, sources said Friday. In addition to Rep. Bill Chappell Jr. (D-Fla.), chairman of the House Appropriations subcommittee on defense, House Armed Services Committee member Roy Dyson (D-Md.) is under investigation, The Times has learned.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Operation Ill Wind blew like a hurricane through the homes and offices of Pentagon and defense industry officials over the past two weeks as FBI agents began seizing evidence of what they believe is massive corruption in the $150-billion-a-year Defense Department weapons-buying system. And the investigation is rapidly accumulating a cast of characters almost as vast and varied as the mountains of documents swept up by the FBI.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Roy Dyson (D-Md.) said Wednesday his former top aide killed himself because a newspaper story unfairly "smeared" his reputation by describing his unorthodox relations with young male members of Dyson's office staff. Emerging from two days of seclusion after the death of Thomas M. Pappas, Dyson denied that either he or Pappas was a homosexual and praised his former administrative assistant as "a man of integrity."
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writers
Members of Congress and acquaintances expressed confusion and sadness Monday over the circumstances that prompted a Maryland congressman's aide to leap to his death from a New York hotel window the day a critical story about him appeared in the Washington Post. In the aftermath of the death of Thomas Pappas, 46, chief aide to Rep. Roy Dyson (D-Md.
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