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NEWS
February 27, 1989 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Roy Eldridge, one of the great innovators on the jazz trumpet, died Sunday in New York at the age of 78. Eldridge's passing in a hospital in Valley Stream, Long Island, came just three weeks after the death of his wife of 53 years, Viola. "He just stopped eating and wanted to die," said a friend of the musician.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2005
AS a producer of jazz concerts, I read with piqued interest Paul de Barros' piece ["Mayday for the Music Too," Nov. 6] regarding the state of jazz and the mass media's tepid relation to it. I admit to wincing when TV scenes portray jazz artists and jazz advocates as social misfits. Having worked closely with literally hundreds of jazz musicians and the clientele that supports their performances, I can state confidently that the men and women who have chosen to pursue the art of jazz as players or listeners are some of the most articulate, intelligent, creative and engaging people that you will meet in any setting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2005
AS a producer of jazz concerts, I read with piqued interest Paul de Barros' piece ["Mayday for the Music Too," Nov. 6] regarding the state of jazz and the mass media's tepid relation to it. I admit to wincing when TV scenes portray jazz artists and jazz advocates as social misfits. Having worked closely with literally hundreds of jazz musicians and the clientele that supports their performances, I can state confidently that the men and women who have chosen to pursue the art of jazz as players or listeners are some of the most articulate, intelligent, creative and engaging people that you will meet in any setting.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL
Trumpeter Eldridge, drummer Krupa and singer O'Day number among the giants, so it's no surprise that the hot licks abound on these recordings--even if the material is more commercial pop/swing than real jazz. Still, even if they did play their most important and enduring work elsewhere, it's nonetheless a pleasure to hear these three together, particularly the exchanges between O'Day and Eldridge as she exhorts him to "blow, man, blow!" and enthuses "root, and solid to boot!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
When Roy (Little Jazz) Eldridge died on Sunday, it was obvious, whatever the official cause of death, that he was the victim of a broken heart. His wife of 53 years, Viola, had recently died, and Eldridge, 78, felt he had nothing to live for. (In a bizarre coincidence, Eldridge's cousin Reunald Jones Sr. also died Sunday in Los Angeles. He, too, was 78 and played trumpet in many name bands.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL
Trumpeter Eldridge, drummer Krupa and singer O'Day number among the giants, so it's no surprise that the hot licks abound on these recordings--even if the material is more commercial pop/swing than real jazz. Still, even if they did play their most important and enduring work elsewhere, it's nonetheless a pleasure to hear these three together, particularly the exchanges between O'Day and Eldridge as she exhorts him to "blow, man, blow!" and enthuses "root, and solid to boot!"
NEWS
April 9, 2009
Jazz greats: A photo caption and an article in Monday's Section A about "The Jazz Century" exhibition at the Quai Branly Museum in Paris misspelled the name of trumpet player Roy Eldridge as Elridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
As jazz greats gathered in New York on Wednesday to pay final respects to trumpeter Roy Eldridge, they learned that another jazz trumpeter, Woody Shaw, had lost his left arm in a freak accident. Shaw, 44, who is legally blind, tumbled down a flight of stairs at a Brooklyn subway station Monday morning and rolled off the platform into the path of an oncoming train. His left arm was so badly mangled that doctors had to amputate it.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | Leonard Feather
Of the 47 subjects dealt with at more than token length in this latest collection of Balliett's chronicles from the New Yorker, 30 are deceased. Still, such artists as Wynton Marsalis, Warren Vache and Tommy Flanagan are among the live and lively topics. The eulogies for Buddy Rich, Roy Eldridge and others bear rereading, as do even Balliett's most egregious prejudices. Rating: * * *
NEWS
January 3, 1986
Henry S. (Benny) Morton, whose trombone was heard in bands ranging from Fletcher Henderson's in 1927 to Benny Carter's, Count Basie's and Teddy Wilson's in the 1940s and '50s, has died of pneumonia in New York City. He was 78 when he died Saturday. "The Encyclopedia of Jazz" refers to Morton as "one of the most personal trombone stylists, with a vibrant intense jazz solo talent."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
When Roy (Little Jazz) Eldridge died on Sunday, it was obvious, whatever the official cause of death, that he was the victim of a broken heart. His wife of 53 years, Viola, had recently died, and Eldridge, 78, felt he had nothing to live for. (In a bizarre coincidence, Eldridge's cousin Reunald Jones Sr. also died Sunday in Los Angeles. He, too, was 78 and played trumpet in many name bands.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Roy Eldridge, one of the great innovators on the jazz trumpet, died Sunday in New York at the age of 78. Eldridge's passing in a hospital in Valley Stream, Long Island, came just three weeks after the death of his wife of 53 years, Viola. "He just stopped eating and wanted to die," said a friend of the musician.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
Compact discs are generally the gift of choice for the jazz enthusiast, but books and videos on jazz can be provocative and informative alternatives. Here are some of the year's top books and videos, as selected by members of The Times' jazz staff: Gene Krupa, "Jazz Legend," DCI Music Video (60 min., $29.95). Through his stint with Benny Goodman and subsequent career as bandleader, Krupa established the drums as a central force in jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1991 | DENNIS HUNT
Natalie Cole's recent chart-topping album, "Unforgettable," has rekindled interest in the music of her late father, Nat. In this 50-minute collection of highlights from his '50s TV variety series, you see this relaxed, low-key crooner at his best, performing a mixture of his signature ballads and up-tempo songs, all arranged and conducted by Nelson Riddle. Guests include jazzmen Stan Getz, Roy Eldridge and Oscar Peterson, and singer Ella Fitzgerald--his partner in a priceless soft-shoe routine.
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