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Roy Firestone

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SPORTS
November 1, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former producer of Roy Firestone's sports interview show on ESPN has sued Firestone and several others for $3 million for each of six allegations surrounding what he called "stealing" the show from him. George Wallach, who created and co-produced "SportsLook," the show on which Firestone was the host on the USA Network from 1980 to 1983 and then on ESPN through 1990, accuses his former partner, producer Bob Seizer, of joining with Firestone in "stealthy connivance to pirate business unfairly."
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SPORTS
October 21, 2003 | T.J. Simers
At the end of the birthday party the folks at the Encino-Tarzana Regional Medical Center threw for John Wooden Monday, I asked the coach kind of a devilish question, and, well, he swore at me. "Goodness gracious," Wooden exclaimed, and I thought Roy Firestone, the birthday bash moderator, was going to keel over in shock. "I've talked to some of his players," Firestone said, "and Coach never uses profanity, but when he says 'goodness gracious,' it's the same thing." Never uses profanity?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1990 | RICK DU BROW
TV or not TV. . . . THE SPORTING LIFE: Roy Firestone is on the phone from Maui. It's suddenly peak season for television's best sports interviewer. Firestone, who turned 37 on Saturday, is marking the 10th anniversary of his daily ESPN series, "SportsLook." And changes are in store for the show, which will sport a new name and a "more journalistic" approach right after the New Year, says Firestone.
SPORTS
May 29, 2001 | Larry Stewart
What: "Up Close Special With Roy Firestone" Where: ESPN, today, 4 p.m. With the Lakers grabbing so much media attention these days, there is a chance of being overdosed on Shaquille O'Neal. But the interview he did with Roy Firestone for this special edition of "Up Close" is definitely worth watching. So is an Alonzo Mourning interview that makes up the second half of the one-hour show. O'Neal talks about his conditioning--"I was always in shape; those media guys are always just making up stuff."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1997 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Notorious basketball bad boy Dennis Rodman cried on Roy Firestone's sports talk show. So did Barry Bonds, the enigmatic and aloof superstar of the San Francisco Giants. Even noted tough guy Jimmy Johnson spoke poignantly to him about the emotional trauma he suffered upon stepping down as head coach of the Dallas Cowboys. Firestone's ability to elicit revealing responses from sports celebrities is a principal reason Sports Illustrated once called him "the best interviewer in the business."
SPORTS
December 29, 1990
I've always hated the standard pregame shows in sports, usually someone such as Brent Mushmouth talking about what we can look for in the upcoming game. But I miss the Laker pregames with Roy Firestone. These were shows of great professionalism and human interest. GREG SMITH Mission Viejo
SPORTS
January 6, 1990
An addendum to Larry Stewart's best-and-worst list for 1989. Best sports interviewer: Roy Firestone. Best sports reporter/radio: Lee Hamilton. Finally, with regard to KABC's radio "personality," the worst crime is that station management apparently underestimates the intelligence of its audience. I'm amazed that KABC continues to air (Ed Bieler's) mediocrity. SHEL KAPLAN, Rolling Hills Estates
SPORTS
January 28, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
What: "Up Close Special With Roy Firestone" Where: ESPN, Saturday, 2-2:30 p.m. Michael Irvin sat down with Roy Firestone for his most extensive interview since his drug arrest in 1996, when he was found in a hotel room with a teammate and two women. While the Dallas Cowboy wide receiver does not come across as the greatest guy in the world, you may feel a tinge of sympathy. "I made mistakes," Irvin says, "but I keep getting back up, keep fighting."
SPORTS
December 18, 1998 | LARRY STEWART
Roy Firestone has done nine in-depth interviews with Mike Tyson, most recently one in Phoenix this week that will be shown on ESPN tonight, 7:30-8. "You can say a lot of things about Tyson, but one thing for sure, he is not a phony," Firestone said after returning home to Toluca Lake. "What you see is what you get. He's not concerned about how he comes across." No question about that.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1997 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Notorious basketball bad boy Dennis Rodman cried on Roy Firestone's sports talk show. So did Barry Bonds, the enigmatic and aloof superstar of the San Francisco Giants. And even tough guy Jimmy Johnson spoke poignantly to him about the emotional trauma he suffered upon stepping down as head coach of the Dallas Cowboys. Firestone's ability to elicit revealing responses from sports celebrities is a principal reason Sports Illustrated once called him "the best interviewer in the business."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1997 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Notorious basketball bad boy Dennis Rodman cried on Roy Firestone's sports talk show. So did Barry Bonds, the enigmatic and aloof superstar of the San Francisco Giants. Even noted tough guy Jimmy Johnson spoke poignantly to him about the emotional trauma he suffered upon stepping down as head coach of the Dallas Cowboys. Firestone's ability to elicit revealing responses from sports celebrities is a principal reason Sports Illustrated once called him "the best interviewer in the business."
SPORTS
June 24, 1994 | LARRY STEWART
Roy Firestone began doing interviews with O.J. Simpson back when he was a sportscaster at Channel 2. But the most in-depth ones were for his ESPN show. He did one in 1986, another in 1989 and a third last year. Clips from those interviews were shown on an ABC special Wednesday night, and for his "Up Close" show on ESPN tonight at 9:30, Firestone will have more from all three.
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