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September 19, 2003 | Bill Plaschke
It has been 40 years, but he still remembers the pitch. The second pitch. The final pitch. It was late September 1963. It was a low inside fastball. He lined it down the left-field line. He sprinted to second base. The crowd roared. Inside a crisp new Dodger uniform, Roy Gleason's heart leaped. He was 20, and after his first major league plate appearance, he was batting 1.000. "I thought I was going to be a superstar," he remembered, and how was he to know?
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SPORTS
September 19, 2003 | Bill Plaschke
It has been 40 years, but he still remembers the pitch. The second pitch. The final pitch. It was late September 1963. It was a low inside fastball. He lined it down the left-field line. He sprinted to second base. The crowd roared. Inside a crisp new Dodger uniform, Roy Gleason's heart leaped. He was 20, and after his first major league plate appearance, he was batting 1.000. "I thought I was going to be a superstar," he remembered, and how was he to know?
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SPORTS
September 21, 2003 | Ben Bolch, Times Staff Writer
Dodger players said the incident in which a fan was shot and killed in a Dodger Stadium parking lot Friday night did not make them feel uneasy about the security of their relatives and friends at games. "The security here is top-notch," right fielder Shawn Green said before the Dodgers played the Giants on Saturday. "It's something that could have happened anywhere. It was one individual who made everyone look bad."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2000 | JANA J. MONJI
Sink eating is "just like having dinner, except without plates and good food," explains a character in Ken LeZebnik's new comedy, "Sink Eating," produced by Marlow Evans Productions at the Matrix Theater. Nine members of a small-town summer stock company nosh in the communal kitchen, but LeZebnik ties them together via monologues. All the potentially interesting scenes happen off stage, only to be duly and dully reported to the refrigerator.
SPORTS
October 11, 2003 | Bill Plaschke
So the Dodgers awaken today with a new owner, some guy named McCourt, and while we know little about him, we know enough. He ain't Fox. So one of sports' most enduring franchises has changed hands for the second time in five years, a holy relic turned into a hot potato, gripped today by a stranger with only one asset we understand, but one is enough. He ain't Fox.
SPORTS
September 19, 2003 | LARRY STEWART
HBO, this buzz is for you. Talk about generating interest in a week-old fight. No warped boxing publicist or network spinner could have dreamed this up. Of course you start with a controversial decision, even though such things are commonplace in boxing. Then you have your announcers take heat for saying that the eventual loser, who happens to be a cash cow for their network, was winning the fight easily. For good measure, have the loser and his promoter threaten inquiries and lawsuits.
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