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Roy Horn

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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Jay Jones
The white tiger that gravely injured magician Roy Horn of Siegfried & Roy in what some called an attack and others said was an effort to save the performer's life has died. Mantecore, one of the big cats that shared the stage with Siegfried & Roy in thousands of shows at the Mirage in Las Vegas , died March 19 after a brief illness. He was 17. The tiger gained worldwide notoriety on Oct. 3, 2003, when he sank his teeth into Horn's neck and dragged him off the stage during a performance.
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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Jay Jones
The white tiger that gravely injured magician Roy Horn of Siegfried & Roy in what some called an attack and others said was an effort to save the performer's life has died. Mantecore, one of the big cats that shared the stage with Siegfried & Roy in thousands of shows at the Mirage in Las Vegas , died March 19 after a brief illness. He was 17. The tiger gained worldwide notoriety on Oct. 3, 2003, when he sank his teeth into Horn's neck and dragged him off the stage during a performance.
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NEWS
April 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Illusionist Roy Horn remained at home, recovering from a near-fatal tiger mauling, while the Las Vegas City Council honored him Wednesday as "citizen of the month." Mayor Oscar Goodman presented the proclamation to "Siegfried & Roy" show manager Bernie Yuman, calling Horn "a great entertainer and a great community partner." Yuman said in an interview that the 59-year-old entertainer was improving daily and expects to be able to make public appearances by early September.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | Richard Abowitz
In a city that is usually impossible to shock, the savaging of Roy Horn on Oct. 3, 2003, onstage and in front of a live audience at the Mirage, created one of those rare moments where all locals can say where they were when they heard the news. Steve Wynn, who spent millions to have the theater at the Mirage customized for the "Siegfried & Roy" show, remembered his first reaction in an interview this week: "I could not believe one of Roy's cats attacked him."
NEWS
March 11, 2004 | From Associated Press
Illusionist Roy Horn of Siegfried & Roy, who was mauled on stage by a tiger in October, says he's on the mend and is working hard with a physical therapist, a German magazine reported Wednesday. "You know, I almost had two feet in the grave, but now I'm doing better," the weekly Bunte quoted Horn as saying in a telephone interview from his Las Vegas home. "I have hired the same trainer as Christopher Reeve and am working with him for nine hours a day," Horn, 59, added.
NEWS
September 4, 2004
Siegfried & Roy -- Articles in various sections of The Times have been in conflict about the weight of the tiger that mauled illusionist Roy Horn on Oct. 3. Times reports have given its weight as 300, 550 and 600 pounds. Siegfried & Roy's publicist and Las Vegas animal control officials said the tiger weighed about 380 pounds.
OPINION
October 13, 2003
"The Tragedy of Wild Animals in Captivity" (letter, Oct. 8) insinuated that Siegfried & Roy's use of big cats in their show "for profit" justified the injury Roy Horn sustained during their performance. Siegfried Fischbacher and Roy Horn, primarily Roy, have single-handedly revived the royal white tiger and white lion. They have spent years working with zoos and organizations worldwide to conserve the species. To classify them in the same category as circus-like acts is doing them a terrible injustice.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Two years after he was nearly killed by a tiger on stage, the magic for Roy Horn is about walking short distances, not making elephants disappear. Horn, of the famed duo Siegfried & Roy, remains partially paralyzed. His goal is to walk without assistance. "It will be soon," he said. "I will surprise everybody when I do it. I like surprises." Horn turned 61 Monday on the second anniversary of the attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2003 | From Reuters
Animal trainer Roy Horn has returned to his home in Las Vegas to continue recovering from the tiger mauling that ended the "Siegfried & Roy" magic show in which he starred, his manager said. Horn, 59, almost died after a male white tiger grabbed him by the neck and dragged him off stage during a performance at the Mirage resort on Oct. 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | Richard Abowitz
In a city that is usually impossible to shock, the savaging of Roy Horn on Oct. 3, 2003, onstage and in front of a live audience at the Mirage, created one of those rare moments where all locals can say where they were when they heard the news. Steve Wynn, who spent millions to have the theater at the Mirage customized for the "Siegfried & Roy" show, remembered his first reaction in an interview this week: "I could not believe one of Roy's cats attacked him."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Two years after he was nearly killed by a tiger on stage, the magic for Roy Horn is about walking short distances, not making elephants disappear. Horn, of the famed duo Siegfried & Roy, remains partially paralyzed. His goal is to walk without assistance. "It will be soon," he said. "I will surprise everybody when I do it. I like surprises." Horn turned 61 Monday on the second anniversary of the attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2004 | From staff and wire reports
Illusionist Roy Horn's first interview since being mauled by a tiger last year won the prime-time ratings Wednesday night with an estimated 14.5 million viewers -- the largest non-Olympic Games audience NBC has had in that 9 to 10 p.m. period since Oct. 1. In "Siegfried & Roy: The Miracle," Horn told Maria Shriver that he fainted on stage during the fateful performance and that the 380-pound tiger named Montecore was only trying to help him by dragging him off stage. "It's just my body.
NEWS
September 4, 2004
Siegfried & Roy -- Articles in various sections of The Times have been in conflict about the weight of the tiger that mauled illusionist Roy Horn on Oct. 3. Times reports have given its weight as 300, 550 and 600 pounds. Siegfried & Roy's publicist and Las Vegas animal control officials said the tiger weighed about 380 pounds.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2004 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Scripts had been written, voice tracks recorded and millions of dollars spent on DreamWorks Animation's upcoming TV comedy about the animals in Siegfried & Roy's Las Vegas show. Then tragedy intruded. Roy Horn was mauled by a 600-pound Siberian tiger and dragged off the stage during an October performance. He was near death, his prognosis uncertain.
NEWS
April 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Illusionist Roy Horn remained at home, recovering from a near-fatal tiger mauling, while the Las Vegas City Council honored him Wednesday as "citizen of the month." Mayor Oscar Goodman presented the proclamation to "Siegfried & Roy" show manager Bernie Yuman, calling Horn "a great entertainer and a great community partner." Yuman said in an interview that the 59-year-old entertainer was improving daily and expects to be able to make public appearances by early September.
NEWS
March 11, 2004 | From Associated Press
Illusionist Roy Horn of Siegfried & Roy, who was mauled on stage by a tiger in October, says he's on the mend and is working hard with a physical therapist, a German magazine reported Wednesday. "You know, I almost had two feet in the grave, but now I'm doing better," the weekly Bunte quoted Horn as saying in a telephone interview from his Las Vegas home. "I have hired the same trainer as Christopher Reeve and am working with him for nine hours a day," Horn, 59, added.
OPINION
October 8, 2003
Re "Tiger Attacks Las Vegas Magician During Show," Oct. 4: My hopes and prayers go out to Las Vegas magician Roy Horn, who was seriously mauled by a tiger in his act. Yet I also can't help feeling that the man brought this on himself, all in the name of profit. People think that wild animals are better off in humans' care, but this is simply not the case. If you watch animals in captivity, they show extreme signs of frustration and boredom, all because they are restricted from displaying behaviors that are innate to them, killing and hunting included.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2004 | From staff and wire reports
Illusionist Roy Horn's first interview since being mauled by a tiger last year won the prime-time ratings Wednesday night with an estimated 14.5 million viewers -- the largest non-Olympic Games audience NBC has had in that 9 to 10 p.m. period since Oct. 1. In "Siegfried & Roy: The Miracle," Horn told Maria Shriver that he fainted on stage during the fateful performance and that the 380-pound tiger named Montecore was only trying to help him by dragging him off stage. "It's just my body.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2003 | From Reuters
Animal trainer Roy Horn has returned to his home in Las Vegas to continue recovering from the tiger mauling that ended the "Siegfried & Roy" magic show in which he starred, his manager said. Horn, 59, almost died after a male white tiger grabbed him by the neck and dragged him off stage during a performance at the Mirage resort on Oct. 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2003 | Ann Conway, Times Staff Writer
"Do you know what the secret to Siegfried & Roy was?" Siegfried Fischbacher asks, his blue eyes shining with tears. "It was the love -- the audience knew it, felt it." Two months after his partner, Roy Horn, was mauled by a royal white Siberian tiger during the illusionists' Las Vegas act, Fischbacher is living in a hotel in Westwood, just a short walk from UCLA Medical Center, where he visits Horn's bedside each day. "Nothing has changed," he says.
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