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October 17, 2012 | By David Ng
A Roy Lichtenstein painting has been returned after having gone missing more than 40 years ago. "Electric Cord," which the American artist created in 1961, mysteriously reappeared in a New York warehouse this summer. The painting was returned this week to Barbara Bertozzi, the widow of American art dealer Leo Castelli, who reportedly sent the painting out for cleaning in 1970 and never saw it again. The return of the painting took place Tuesday at a news conference with U.S. Atty.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By David Ng
A trove of 200,000 photographic items from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation is being donated to five institutions around the world, including the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the National Gallery of Art in Washington. The collection of photographic material was shot by the late Harry Shunk and Janos Kender, and dates from approximately 1958 to 1973. The two other recipients of the donation are the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Tate in Britain. The Shunk-Kender trove depicts notable artists and other cultural types in the act of creation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
CHICAGO - Roy Lichtenstein's 1963 painting "Whaam!" shows an American fighter pilot shooting down an enemy aircraft in a dramatic explosion of comic-book color. Among his most familiar works, it turns up in the third room of a wonderfully revealing retrospective at the Art Institute of Chicago. But the painting looks very different than it has before - deeper, richer, more bracingly complex. That's one sign of a worthwhile show. "Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective" is huge - more than 100 paintings, plus sculptures and drawings, spanning half a century.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By David Ng
A Roy Lichtenstein sculpture will be installed on the grounds of the newly opened Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. The artist's "Coups de Pinceau" (1988) is scheduled to be unveiled Saturday on South Santa Monica Boulevard between North Crescent and North Canon drives. The artwork, which is an artist's proof created posthumously in 2011, is on extended loan from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation in New York. (An artist's proof is, in this case, a recently created edition of the original conception.)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1994 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Roy Lichtenstein was among a number of artists who playfully put the Pop in Pop art between 1961 and 1965. In the process, they swept away the pale doldrums into which third- and fourth-generation recapitulations of Abstract Expressionist painting had by then so dismally fallen.
WORLD
August 14, 2012 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - At the Museum of Contemporary Art here, 19-year-old Aristotle Qajari, whose father named him after the celebrated Greek philosopher and writer, was mesmerized by an art form that is considerably more recent - and completely new to him. "I have not heard about Pop art yet," said Qajari, an architecture student, drawing a sketch of Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein's 1961 painting "Roto Broil. " The modern, Western art is a new concept for many here in the Islamic Republic, said the young student, and many Iranians, preoccupied with everyday life, don't have time to think about such issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What seemed impossible has become all but definite: A local arts venture has won the enthusiastic support of both arts professionals and city officials. The project, "Luna Luna," is described as an outdoor contemporary art museum, and its 28 works are scheduled to be installed temporarily at Balboa Park's Inspiration Point, the site of the old Naval Hospital. Local arts leaders are pleased that the project will bring the work of such internationally known artists as Roy Lichtenstein, David Hockney, Georg Baselitz and others to San Diego in an innovative, participatory form.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1994 | SUSAN MORGAN, Susan Morgan is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles.
On a bright winter morning, before the arctic weather descended upon the city, Roy Lichtenstein walks into the Guggenheim Museum. Although it's a Thursday and the museum is closed to visitors, the entire building feels animated by a spectacular retrospective of Lichtenstein's work. The paintings--with their bold outlines and primary-colored images--spiral around the Frank Lloyd Wright ramp, spilling out like a brilliant reel of film unwinding.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Five paintings by U.S. pop artists Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein were stolen from a museum close to Stockholm early Friday. Thieves broke into the Aaberg Museum in Baalsta outside the Swedish capital just after 2 a.m. and stole three Lichtenstein artworks and two Warhol paintings, museum Chief Executive Carina Aaberg said. The stolen pieces have a value of about $500,000, she said.
NEWS
October 4, 1987
A survey of artistic achievements of Gemini G.E.L. (Graphic Editions Limited) of Los Angeles will be presented by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., from Nov.1 through Jan. 3. The exhibition includes more than 160 examples of lithograph, screen printing, etching, woodcuts, cast paper, sculpture and combined media.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By David Ng
Did it come with a card attached that says, "Thank you for being a friend"? A 1991 painting depicting a topless Bea Arthur that was created by artist John Currin has sold at an auction Wednesday for $1.9 million. The sale was part of a larger Christie's auction in New York of post-war and contemporary art that brought in a total of $495 million -- a record figure for any art auction. The Christie's sale featured 72 items by many of the most coveted names in 20th century art. Works by Jackson Pollock, Roy Lichtenstein and Jean-Michel Basquiat brought in record auction amounts.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
Jason Meadows' new work at Marc Foxx Gallery gamely attempts to engage pressing social and political situations today. Three large recent sculptures and a painted wall relief try different tactics with uneven results. Least successful is “Justice League,” which collides red and blue folded fans alluding to the flying capes of cartoon superheroes. They stand atop a precariously tilting pedestal of the sort on which a politician's conventional statue might be erected. The adaptation of grandiose red-state, blue-state, right-left political conflict is too schematic to be effective, while an implied narrative of volatile collapse seems overly melodramatic.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By David Ng
A Roy Lichtenstein painting has been returned after having gone missing more than 40 years ago. "Electric Cord," which the American artist created in 1961, mysteriously reappeared in a New York warehouse this summer. The painting was returned this week to Barbara Bertozzi, the widow of American art dealer Leo Castelli, who reportedly sent the painting out for cleaning in 1970 and never saw it again. The return of the painting took place Tuesday at a news conference with U.S. Atty.
WORLD
August 14, 2012 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - At the Museum of Contemporary Art here, 19-year-old Aristotle Qajari, whose father named him after the celebrated Greek philosopher and writer, was mesmerized by an art form that is considerably more recent - and completely new to him. "I have not heard about Pop art yet," said Qajari, an architecture student, drawing a sketch of Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein's 1961 painting "Roto Broil. " The modern, Western art is a new concept for many here in the Islamic Republic, said the young student, and many Iranians, preoccupied with everyday life, don't have time to think about such issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
CHICAGO - Roy Lichtenstein's 1963 painting "Whaam!" shows an American fighter pilot shooting down an enemy aircraft in a dramatic explosion of comic-book color. Among his most familiar works, it turns up in the third room of a wonderfully revealing retrospective at the Art Institute of Chicago. But the painting looks very different than it has before - deeper, richer, more bracingly complex. That's one sign of a worthwhile show. "Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective" is huge - more than 100 paintings, plus sculptures and drawings, spanning half a century.
IMAGE
April 24, 2011 | Ellen Olivier
For the Collectors Committee of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, April 9 was a big day. The museum's curators packed the morning with presentations of artworks they hoped to acquire, Patina served up lunch beside the Resnick Pavilion, and the evening featured a gala dinner where members voted their preferences. "The curators' presentations are so compelling that you feel you want to get everything," said actor Julian Sands, attending with his wife, Evgenia Citkowitz. Will Ferrell called his wife, Viveca Paulin-Ferrell, the night's auction chairwoman, "the house curator" but expressed his own interest in modern and contemporary furnishings and art, naming Ed Ruscha, Richard Diebenkorn and Roy Lichtenstein among his favorite artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | From the Washington Post
Robert Meyerhoff, a Baltimore philanthropist who has one of the world's outstanding collections of post-World War II paintings, has received approval to turn his Maryland estate into a museum that will be part of the National Gallery of Art. The Phoenix, Md., estate, north of Baltimore and 65 miles from the National Gallery in Washington, would be the first permanent location off the national Mall for works in the museum's collection. It will open to the public upon the death of Meyerhoff, who is 84. In 1987 Meyerhoff and his wife, Jane, pledged to give their collection of 265 works to the gallery, including pieces by Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein and Ellsworth Kelly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2010 | My-Thuan Tran, Los Angeles Times
Count Giuseppe Panza di Biumo, an Italian collector of American art whose cache of paintings and sculptures by Mark Rothko, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein and others legitimized the fledgling Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, has died. He was 87. Panza died Friday night in Milan, said MOCA spokeswoman Lyn Winter. No cause was announced. Panza became the first European collector of postwar American art. He was able to connect the dots in a new American aesthetic, playing a large role in promoting Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism and Conceptual art, as well as catapulting Los Angeles artists to international credibility.
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