Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoy Lichtenstein Foundation
IN THE NEWS

Roy Lichtenstein Foundation

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By David Ng
A Roy Lichtenstein sculpture will be installed on the grounds of the newly opened Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. The artist's "Coups de Pinceau" (1988) is scheduled to be unveiled Saturday on South Santa Monica Boulevard between North Crescent and North Canon drives. The artwork, which is an artist's proof created posthumously in 2011, is on extended loan from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation in New York. (An artist's proof is, in this case, a recently created edition of the original conception.)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By David Ng
A trove of 200,000 photographic items from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation is being donated to five institutions around the world, including the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the National Gallery of Art in Washington. The collection of photographic material was shot by the late Harry Shunk and Janos Kender, and dates from approximately 1958 to 1973. The two other recipients of the donation are the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Tate in Britain. The Shunk-Kender trove depicts notable artists and other cultural types in the act of creation.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By David Ng
A trove of 200,000 photographic items from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation is being donated to five institutions around the world, including the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the National Gallery of Art in Washington. The collection of photographic material was shot by the late Harry Shunk and Janos Kender, and dates from approximately 1958 to 1973. The two other recipients of the donation are the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Tate in Britain. The Shunk-Kender trove depicts notable artists and other cultural types in the act of creation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By David Ng
A Roy Lichtenstein sculpture will be installed on the grounds of the newly opened Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. The artist's "Coups de Pinceau" (1988) is scheduled to be unveiled Saturday on South Santa Monica Boulevard between North Crescent and North Canon drives. The artwork, which is an artist's proof created posthumously in 2011, is on extended loan from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation in New York. (An artist's proof is, in this case, a recently created edition of the original conception.)
NATIONAL
October 17, 2012 | By Tina Susman
A painting by American artist Roy Lichtenstein of a large electric cord, valued at some $4 million, is back with its rightful owner 42 years after it vanished while in the hands of an art restorer. Officials from the FBI and the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan handed the work over to a smiling Barbara Bertozzi Castelli on Tuesday, ending a mystery that began in 1970 when Castelli's late husband, art dealer Leo Castelli, sent the painting out for cleaning. Castelli had acquired the painting in the 1960s for about $750 and had displayed it at his New York City gallery.
NEWS
October 1, 2002 | GINA PICCALO and LOUISE ROUG
On a wet Saturday night in Beverly Hills, it seemed that the crowd inside the Gagosian Gallery was more interested in itself than in the art: 35 pieces from the 1980s by Roy Lichtenstein. One woman walked through the crowd leading her dog on a bright green leash. In an upstairs hallway, another guest quizzed a friend on a new restaurant: "Was the shish kebab good?" he asked. "Oh yes!" she answered. Yet another guest noted the wall-sized abstract paintings: "Once you see it, you sort of get it."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2002 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Roy Lichtenstein's abstract paintings at Gagosian Gallery offer an eloquent argument against the seemingly sensible idea that great art comes from great ideas. Just the opposite is true of the Pop artist's "Perfect and Imperfect" series, which begins with an idea so simplistic that it can only be described as dumb. The exhibition's 14 canvases and 20 drawings follow the same recipe. Start with a rectangle, either horizontal or vertical.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|