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Roy M Cohn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1986 | United Press International
Roy M. Cohn, who was chief counsel to Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy during the communist "witch hunts" of the 1950s, was buried Monday after a funeral shrouded in secrecy, his law office said. A woman answering the telephone at Cohn's Manhattan law office said the funeral was held about 1 p.m. in New York. She declined further details. Cohn died Saturday at age 59 at a Bethesda, Md., hospital of complications stemming from AIDS.
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NATIONAL
May 6, 2003 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
The Senate on Monday opened long-sealed transcripts of closed-door hearings conducted by Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, removing a last layer of secrecy surrounding the tactics he employed during his infamous hunt for communists in the government 50 years ago. The newly released documents are replete with examples of the abrasive style McCarthy and his aides, especially chief counsel Roy M.
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NEWS
April 4, 1986 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
After more than a quarter of a century of fighting with him about his taxes, the federal government filed suit Thursday against Roy M. Cohn to collect almost $7 million the Internal Revenue Service says it is owed. The civil suit seeks to seize and sell Cohn's Manhattan town house and his Connecticut estate, charging that the controversial lawyer and some of his law partners concealed his true ownership of the properties so tax liens couldn't be collected. "A lot of money is owed to the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1992 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is based in New York and is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Actor Ron Vawter thinks of Roy Cohn and Jack Smith as chameleons: men who changed the color of their skin to avoid being eaten. Cohn was a powerful right-wing lawyer who rose to prominence as the hatchet man for Joseph McCarthy, the redbaiting U.S. senator who bullied the political Establishment in the '50s. Smith was a performance artist whose 1962 avant-garde film "Flaming Creatures" featured cavorting drag queens. But what made these two "chameleons" vulnerable was their homosexuality.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Sooner or later, Roy Cohn's biographer said, still shaking his head after 18 months and 500 pages of grappling with this very issue, it comes down to this: How could a man "so morally repugnant" get away with it? How could Cohn court, and win, the rich, the powerful, the influential? How did a 25-year-old lawyer rise to become general counsel to America's chief communist chaser, Sen. Joseph McCarthy, then survive to prosper long after McCarthy's fall? How did Cohn seduce the press?
NATIONAL
May 6, 2003 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
The Senate on Monday opened long-sealed transcripts of closed-door hearings conducted by Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, removing a last layer of secrecy surrounding the tactics he employed during his infamous hunt for communists in the government 50 years ago. The newly released documents are replete with examples of the abrasive style McCarthy and his aides, especially chief counsel Roy M.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1992 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is based in New York and is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Actor Ron Vawter thinks of Roy Cohn and Jack Smith as chameleons: men who changed the color of their skin to avoid being eaten. Cohn was a powerful right-wing lawyer who rose to prominence as the hatchet man for Joseph McCarthy, the redbaiting U.S. senator who bullied the political Establishment in the '50s. Smith was a performance artist whose 1962 avant-garde film "Flaming Creatures" featured cavorting drag queens. But what made these two "chameleons" vulnerable was their homosexuality.
NEWS
February 2, 1986 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Once again, it was as much a New Year's Eve event as the annual dropping of the brightly lit ball at Times Square. Limousines double-parked outside the elegant Upper East Side six-story town house. The parade of tuxedos and ball gowns through the thick oak doors easily rivaled a Hollywood premier. Champagne flowed freely--and so did tears when the thin, haggard-looking 58-year-old host slowly rose to speak.
NEWS
July 22, 1986 | Associated Press
Roy M. Cohn, the controversial defense lawyer who was disbarred last month in New York state, has returned to the National Institutes of Health for treatment, a hospital spokeswoman said Monday. Cohn, who was treated last year at the National Cancer Institute for liver cancer, has been admitted to the NIH Clinical Center. Irene Haske, a hospital spokeswoman, said Cohn was at the center, but said she was not authorized to say when he was admitted or for what he was being treated.
NEWS
June 23, 1986 | Associated Press
Power broker Roy M. Cohn, whose checkered legal career has taken him from the Senate floor to the side of mobsters over four decades, was disbarred today by the state. The order against the flamboyant Cohn was handed down by the Appellate Division of state Supreme Court, which polices lawyers for the state. A lawyers' disciplinary committee, an arm of the appeals court, recommended Cohn's disbarment a year ago over three cases dating to 1966. The court could have rejected the recommendation.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Sooner or later, Roy Cohn's biographer said, still shaking his head after 18 months and 500 pages of grappling with this very issue, it comes down to this: How could a man "so morally repugnant" get away with it? How could Cohn court, and win, the rich, the powerful, the influential? How did a 25-year-old lawyer rise to become general counsel to America's chief communist chaser, Sen. Joseph McCarthy, then survive to prosper long after McCarthy's fall? How did Cohn seduce the press?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1986 | United Press International
Roy M. Cohn, who was chief counsel to Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy during the communist "witch hunts" of the 1950s, was buried Monday after a funeral shrouded in secrecy, his law office said. A woman answering the telephone at Cohn's Manhattan law office said the funeral was held about 1 p.m. in New York. She declined further details. Cohn died Saturday at age 59 at a Bethesda, Md., hospital of complications stemming from AIDS.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
After more than a quarter of a century of fighting with him about his taxes, the federal government filed suit Thursday against Roy M. Cohn to collect almost $7 million the Internal Revenue Service says it is owed. The civil suit seeks to seize and sell Cohn's Manhattan town house and his Connecticut estate, charging that the controversial lawyer and some of his law partners concealed his true ownership of the properties so tax liens couldn't be collected. "A lot of money is owed to the U.S.
NEWS
February 2, 1986 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Once again, it was as much a New Year's Eve event as the annual dropping of the brightly lit ball at Times Square. Limousines double-parked outside the elegant Upper East Side six-story town house. The parade of tuxedos and ball gowns through the thick oak doors easily rivaled a Hollywood premier. Champagne flowed freely--and so did tears when the thin, haggard-looking 58-year-old host slowly rose to speak.
NEWS
June 24, 1986 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Roy M. Cohn, one of the nation's best-known lawyers since his Cold War service as Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy's chief aide, was disbarred in New York state Monday. The five-member Appelate Division of the state Supreme Court ruled unanimously to bar the 59-year-old Cohn from practicing law, effective immediately, for four charges of professional misconduct. "Simply stated, the four charges involved alleged dishonesty, fraud, deceit and misrepresentation," the court wrote in a 49-page decision.
BOOKS
August 22, 1993 | David Lohrey
The reading public rarely greets the publication of a highly acclaimed play with more than an imperceptible shrug. Perhaps, as is so often the case, the anonymous reader knows intuitively what few critics are willing to admit, namely, that few theatrical spectacles can stand the scrutiny of a close reading. Tony Kushner's "Angels in America" proves the exception.
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