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NEWS
September 11, 1988
A former chairman of Ashland Oil was arrested in July for alleged conspiracy to steal confidential company documents and sell them to Iran for use in a lawsuit against the oil giant, the company said. In a statement from corporate headquarters in Ashland, Ky., officials confirmed a New York Times report that Orin Atkins had been arrested in New York and charged with interstate transportation of stolen property.
NEWS
September 11, 1988
A former chairman of Ashland Oil was arrested in July for alleged conspiracy to steal confidential company documents and sell them to Iran for use in a lawsuit against the oil giant, the company said. In a statement from corporate headquarters in Ashland, Ky., officials confirmed a New York Times report that Orin Atkins had been arrested in New York and charged with interstate transportation of stolen property.
NEWS
February 2, 1987 | BOB DROGIN and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
Saying he is not going to be the "fall guy," Iranian arms broker Manucher Ghorbanifar complained angrily in his first interview with U.S. investigators that he is being blamed unfairly for the collapse of secret U.S. arms sales to Iran and the diversion of profits to the contras , The Times has learned.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Justice Department has asked Swiss authorities to temporarily block the bank accounts and records of a total of 10 men and two companies in connection with the arms-for-Iran affair, Swiss sources said Friday. The names of three of the men were disclosed earlier in the week by banking sources: Marine Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, who has been dismissed from the staff of the National Security Council, Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord, a former Pentagon official, and Albert A.
NEWS
December 12, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
A brief exchange between CIA Director William J. Casey and reporters after Casey had completed testimony in a closed session of the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday shows that he makes a distinction between when he "learned" of the diversion of Iran arms sales funds to Nicaragua's contras and when he first had "heard of" it. The exchange took place in a Capitol hallway. Casey has said that he learned of the controversial funds diversion from Atty. Gen.
NEWS
January 6, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
CIA Director William J. Casey told an associate of international arms dealers in January, 1985--seven months before the first known White House-sanctioned arms shipments--that the United States was supplying arms to Iran, according to documents filed Monday in a New York federal court. Roy M.
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in a major arms-smuggling conspiracy case said Thursday that he plans to order the federal government to disclose the contents of any communications between White House officials and international arms merchants involved in the Iran arms affair. Over the objections of Justice Department lawyers, U.S.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | KENNETH FREED and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
Walter Ernest Miller and Donald Fraser, the two men alleged to make up the so-called "Canadian Connection" in the American-Iran arms scandal, are big-money players, but their ties appear closer to the routine deals of real estate development than the shadowy world of international arms sales.
NEWS
February 2, 1987 | BOB DROGIN and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
Saying he is not going to be the "fall guy," Iranian arms broker Manucher Ghorbanifar complained angrily in his first interview with U.S. investigators that he is being blamed unfairly for the collapse of secret U.S. arms sales to Iran and the diversion of profits to the contras , The Times has learned.
NEWS
December 15, 1986 | KENNETH FREED and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
Roy M. Furmark, the American energy consultant who first disclosed the so-called "Canadian connection" in the U.S.-Iranian arms scandal, has agreed to provide information about the arrangement to the Canadian government later this week, the Toronto Star reported Sunday. In a story datelined from New York, the Star quoted Furmark as saying that he expects to meet with Canadian government officials in Washington on Thursday, when he is to testify for a second time before a Senate panel.
NEWS
January 10, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual public statement defending the conduct of its top officers, the CIA confirmed Friday that Director William J. Casey was told last October that money from Iranian arms sales might have been diverted to Nicaraguan rebels--but the agency said he considered the report nothing more than "tenuous speculation." "No credible evidence of a diversion of monies ever came to the attention of the agency," said the CIA statement, read by spokeswoman Sharon Foster.
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