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Roy Mcmakin

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2003 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Every once in a while, art and design intermingle so promiscuously that these ordinarily distinct disciplines become a hotbed of boundary-bending creativity. It happened during the Russian revolution, when many of the most advanced painters and sculptors designed posters, textiles and stage sets. It happened in Germany in the 1920s, when the Bauhaus' talented faculty fused form and function in everything from teapots to skyscrapers.
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HOME & GARDEN
May 30, 2009 | David A. Keeps
As part of the 1980s L.A. art scene that included David Hockney and Ed Ruscha, Roy McMakin pursued a singular vision: creating functional sculpture based on home furnishings, decorated with a painterly touch. Long before his Domestic Furniture studio produced office pieces for the Getty museum and the set of "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno," McMakin built this cabinet, a witty take on traditional Shaker style.
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NEWS
January 12, 1990 | LEON WHITESON, Whiteson writes regularly on design and architecture for the View section
A plain glass door on Beverly Boulevard opens into the oddly haunted yet utterly down-home world of Roy McMakin and his Domestic Furniture Co. An artist who designs furniture, McMakin makes chairs, tables, beds and chests of drawers that are sculptural, slightly bizarre and yet carry an air of cozy Americana. His furnishings share the fusion of ordinariness and oddness that characterized David Lynch's disturbing small-town movie "Blue Velvet."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2003 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Every once in a while, art and design intermingle so promiscuously that these ordinarily distinct disciplines become a hotbed of boundary-bending creativity. It happened during the Russian revolution, when many of the most advanced painters and sculptors designed posters, textiles and stage sets. It happened in Germany in the 1920s, when the Bauhaus' talented faculty fused form and function in everything from teapots to skyscrapers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2002 | Susan Freudenheim; Booth Moore
Roy McMakin Designer/artist A graduate of the fine-arts program at UC San Diego, McMakin began to turn heads when he turned to designing furniture, often adjusting scale and mixing painted wood and patterned fabrics in visions that were outside the ordinary but still completely functional. His work became a favorite in arts circles, adorning offices at the Getty Museum and private homes.
MAGAZINE
July 15, 2001 | MICHARL WEBB, Michael Webb last wrote for the magazine about the stairway design at a Venice house
Only the purple front door hints at the exuberance of color and invention concealed by the prim white facade of a 1920s house in West Los Angeles. Open that door and the first thing you see is a mustard-yellow staircase. Step inside and you're greeted by a living room full of furniture a talented kid might have sketched with multi-hued crayons. Welcome to the cheerful, light-filled home of Stuart Bloomberg, co-chairman of ABC, his wife Mary Farrell, and their five children.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2003 | Susan Freudenheim, Times Staff Writer
The big pink chest of drawers has knobs that don't match and a couple of odd-colored drawers. Finely wrought in every detail, it has some knobs that are a little too big, others a little too small. Colors change almost randomly -- a top drawer and one of the middle drawer's knobs are white, the bottom drawer and its knobs are red. This is not your grandmother's bedroom bureau, although at first glance that's what it looks like.
HOME & GARDEN
May 30, 2009 | David A. Keeps
As part of the 1980s L.A. art scene that included David Hockney and Ed Ruscha, Roy McMakin pursued a singular vision: creating functional sculpture based on home furnishings, decorated with a painterly touch. Long before his Domestic Furniture studio produced office pieces for the Getty museum and the set of "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno," McMakin built this cabinet, a witty take on traditional Shaker style.
HOME & GARDEN
September 20, 2007 | David A. Keeps
For its fall 20th century decorative-arts sale, Bonhams & Butterfields continues to offer furnishings of a more recent vintage. In addition to the standard fare of early-1900s glass, California ceramics and mid-century furniture, contemporary pieces by L.A. luminaries such as Roy McMakin and Sally Sirkin Lewis will be up for auction. Sami Hayek's 2005 Scott office suite may set a benchmark for the young L.A. designer, whose pieces are so new they rarely come up for resale.
MAGAZINE
October 31, 1999 | Leslee Komaiko
When a friend showed Dewey Nicks some custom pieces by Roy McMakin, who designed the office furnishings for the Getty Center, Nicks snapped them up. The colors were irresistible and the scale big, just what the photographer wanted. "It's easier to find smaller pieces," he says. His purchases include a dining room table, pictured right, a wing chair and a fainting couch, both upholstered in mohair, as well as lacquered bookcases. All but the table are sitting in his storage facility.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2003 | Susan Freudenheim, Times Staff Writer
The big pink chest of drawers has knobs that don't match and a couple of odd-colored drawers. Finely wrought in every detail, it has some knobs that are a little too big, others a little too small. Colors change almost randomly -- a top drawer and one of the middle drawer's knobs are white, the bottom drawer and its knobs are red. This is not your grandmother's bedroom bureau, although at first glance that's what it looks like.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2002 | Susan Freudenheim; Booth Moore
Roy McMakin Designer/artist A graduate of the fine-arts program at UC San Diego, McMakin began to turn heads when he turned to designing furniture, often adjusting scale and mixing painted wood and patterned fabrics in visions that were outside the ordinary but still completely functional. His work became a favorite in arts circles, adorning offices at the Getty Museum and private homes.
MAGAZINE
July 15, 2001 | MICHARL WEBB, Michael Webb last wrote for the magazine about the stairway design at a Venice house
Only the purple front door hints at the exuberance of color and invention concealed by the prim white facade of a 1920s house in West Los Angeles. Open that door and the first thing you see is a mustard-yellow staircase. Step inside and you're greeted by a living room full of furniture a talented kid might have sketched with multi-hued crayons. Welcome to the cheerful, light-filled home of Stuart Bloomberg, co-chairman of ABC, his wife Mary Farrell, and their five children.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | LEON WHITESON, Whiteson writes regularly on design and architecture for the View section
A plain glass door on Beverly Boulevard opens into the oddly haunted yet utterly down-home world of Roy McMakin and his Domestic Furniture Co. An artist who designs furniture, McMakin makes chairs, tables, beds and chests of drawers that are sculptural, slightly bizarre and yet carry an air of cozy Americana. His furnishings share the fusion of ordinariness and oddness that characterized David Lynch's disturbing small-town movie "Blue Velvet."
MAGAZINE
August 11, 1991 | MICHAEL WEBB
The Larchmont Village area of Los Angeles is full of streets where nothing but the cars seem to have changed since the '20s and you half-expect to come upon a film crew shooting a Laurel and Hardy comedy. On one of these streets, furniture designer Roy McMakin has restored a tiny bungalow that looks as innovative today as it did when it was built in 1917. This modernist gem--white stucco devoid of ornament--was built by architect Irving Gill, a pioneer of concrete construction.
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