Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoy Moore
IN THE NEWS

Roy Moore

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Moore is as tough as a cheap cut of Alabama barbecue. And almost as salty. He's a kick-boxing, steer-wrestling, built-his-house-with-his-own-two-hands judge who became famous a few years back for sticking a plaque of the Ten Commandments on the wall of his Etowah County courtroom and then refusing to take it down. Now he's running for the highest judgeship in the state. And he's fixing to win.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
Alabama's “Ten Commandments judge” has climbed back to the mountain top. Handily beating two fellow Republican challengers,   Roy Moore was elected to a six-year term as the state Supreme Court's chief justice, a position from which he was ousted in 2003 for refusing to remove a 5,200-pound granite monument to the commandments from the rotunda of the state Supreme Court's building. Moore earned more than 50% of the vote during Tuesday's election. “I have no doubt this is vindication for what I stood for,” Moore told supporters during a televised election speech.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
September 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Seeking to move his battle over religion in government to a national stage, suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore offered his Ten Commandments monument to Congress for display in the U.S. Capitol. The offer came nearly three weeks after the 5,300-pound granite monument was removed from the rotunda of the state Judicial Building in Montgomery to comply with a federal judge's order.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2012 | By Richard Fausset
Try this one out as a sort of 11th commandment of Southern politics: Thou Shalt Not Dismiss an Alabama Politician Who Earned National Notoriety for Sticking a Humongous Statue of the Ten Commandments in a Government Building. That's right, y'all. Judge Roy Moore is back! Moore, as you may recall, is the former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court who was famously (or infamously) removed from his post in 2003 after ignoring a federal court order to get rid of his pet project, a 5,300-pound stone Ten Commandments memorial, from a state courthouse.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, who was ousted in 2003 for disobeying a federal court order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state Judicial Building, said he would be a candidate for governor in 2006. Moore, 58, a fundamentalist Christian who supports school prayer and opposes gay marriage, pledged to fight higher taxes, tighten restrictions on illegal immigrants and improve education if elected.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
Alabama's “Ten Commandments judge” has climbed back to the mountain top. Handily beating two fellow Republican challengers,   Roy Moore was elected to a six-year term as the state Supreme Court's chief justice, a position from which he was ousted in 2003 for refusing to remove a 5,200-pound granite monument to the commandments from the rotunda of the state Supreme Court's building. Moore earned more than 50% of the vote during Tuesday's election. “I have no doubt this is vindication for what I stood for,” Moore told supporters during a televised election speech.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2012 | By Richard Fausset
Try this one out as a sort of 11th commandment of Southern politics: Thou Shalt Not Dismiss an Alabama Politician Who Earned National Notoriety for Sticking a Humongous Statue of the Ten Commandments in a Government Building. That's right, y'all. Judge Roy Moore is back! Moore, as you may recall, is the former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court who was famously (or infamously) removed from his post in 2003 after ignoring a federal court order to get rid of his pet project, a 5,300-pound stone Ten Commandments memorial, from a state courthouse.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Moore has done it again. On Tuesday, in the wee hours of the morning when nobody was looking, Moore and a couple of workmen sneaked a 5,280-pound granite monument to the Ten Commandments into the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court. Moore didn't ask anyone's permission, but he didn't have to. The country judge who rose to prominence by hanging a Ten Commandments plaque on his courtroom wall is now the court's chief justice, the top judge in Alabama.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Moore is a West Point graduate, a Vietnam War veteran, the only Republican circuit court judge in Etowah County--and a Christian. For almost a year, he has been embroiled in a lawsuit pitting him and his supporters--those who view America as a Christian nation--against the ACLU and the plaintiffs they represent, who want Moore to leave his Christian beliefs outside the courthouse door. It all started when Moore, 47, brought his handcrafted plaque of the Ten Commandments into the courtroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1997
Judge Roy Moore of Alabama ought to post the Bill of Rights instead of the Ten Commandments. It's certainly more appropriate for a courtroom! HELEN TIEGER Huntington Beach
NATIONAL
October 4, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, who was ousted in 2003 for disobeying a federal court order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state Judicial Building, said he would be a candidate for governor in 2006. Moore, 58, a fundamentalist Christian who supports school prayer and opposes gay marriage, pledged to fight higher taxes, tighten restrictions on illegal immigrants and improve education if elected.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Seeking to move his battle over religion in government to a national stage, suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore offered his Ten Commandments monument to Congress for display in the U.S. Capitol. The offer came nearly three weeks after the 5,300-pound granite monument was removed from the rotunda of the state Judicial Building in Montgomery to comply with a federal judge's order.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Moore has done it again. On Tuesday, in the wee hours of the morning when nobody was looking, Moore and a couple of workmen sneaked a 5,280-pound granite monument to the Ten Commandments into the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court. Moore didn't ask anyone's permission, but he didn't have to. The country judge who rose to prominence by hanging a Ten Commandments plaque on his courtroom wall is now the court's chief justice, the top judge in Alabama.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Moore is as tough as a cheap cut of Alabama barbecue. And almost as salty. He's a kick-boxing, steer-wrestling, built-his-house-with-his-own-two-hands judge who became famous a few years back for sticking a plaque of the Ten Commandments on the wall of his Etowah County courtroom and then refusing to take it down. Now he's running for the highest judgeship in the state. And he's fixing to win.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Moore is a West Point graduate, a Vietnam War veteran, the only Republican circuit court judge in Etowah County--and a Christian. For almost a year, he has been embroiled in a lawsuit pitting him and his supporters--those who view America as a Christian nation--against the ACLU and the plaintiffs they represent, who want Moore to leave his Christian beliefs outside the courthouse door. It all started when Moore, 47, brought his handcrafted plaque of the Ten Commandments into the courtroom.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Prosecutors urged a judicial panel to oust suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore for disobeying a federal judge's order to move his Ten Commandments monument from the state courthouse rotunda. Moore, whose cause has rallied religious conservatives nationwide, argued he was upholding his oath of office and promises to Alabama voters when he refused to have the 5,300-pound granite monument removed. The panel was expected to announce a decision today.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Roy Moore, ousted from the Alabama Supreme Court for refusing to obey a federal court order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state Judicial Building rotunda in Montgomery, announced he will fight to get his job back. Moore, former chief justice, issued a statement saying he will file an appeal of his removal from office with the Alabama Supreme Court by Wednesday. He was removed from office Nov. 13.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|