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Roy Porter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2002 | From Associated Press
Roy Porter, a writer and historian who attracted an international readership, has died. He was 55. Porter, author of an acclaimed history of London and several other well-received books, was found lying in a road beside his bicycle Sunday. He died in a hospital near his home in southern England a short time later. His death is under investigation. Porter had recently retired from the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London.
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BOOKS
February 22, 2004 | Thomas Laqueur, Thomas Laqueur teaches European cultural history at UC Berkeley and is the author of several books, including "Making Sex: Body and Gender From the Greeks to Freud."
Roy Porter died two years ago at 55. Newly retired, newly married, he moved to the seaside to live a quieter -- but what would have been no less productive -- life than the one he had left in London as professor of the history of medicine at the Wellcome Institute. No one of his remarkable generation of British historians -- Simon Schama and John Brewer were his contemporaries at Cambridge -- wrote more, wrote better or wrote more exuberantly about the 18th century. There was no end in sight.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1998 | PATRICK KERKSTRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a packed house at The Main Event on La Brea Avenue on Saturday afternoon. Well-dressed patrons sipped Scotch and water, listened to the performances of local jazz favorites, and sat back to reflect on the life and talents of the late Roy Porter--jazz drummer and Los Angeles bebop legend. "We pioneered the bebop movement out here in 1945," recalled venerated saxophonist Teddy Edwards, who played and recorded with Porter many times. "That man was my good friend.
BOOKS
April 14, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
TWO GARDENERS A Friendship in Letters By Katharine S. White and Elizabeth Lawrence Edited by Emily Herring Wilson Beacon Press: 274 pp., $25 Following her book, "Onward and Upward in the Garden" and her column of the same name that ran in the New Yorker from 1958 until her death in 1977, Katherine White's fans were legion.
BOOKS
February 22, 2004 | Thomas Laqueur, Thomas Laqueur teaches European cultural history at UC Berkeley and is the author of several books, including "Making Sex: Body and Gender From the Greeks to Freud."
Roy Porter died two years ago at 55. Newly retired, newly married, he moved to the seaside to live a quieter -- but what would have been no less productive -- life than the one he had left in London as professor of the history of medicine at the Wellcome Institute. No one of his remarkable generation of British historians -- Simon Schama and John Brewer were his contemporaries at Cambridge -- wrote more, wrote better or wrote more exuberantly about the 18th century. There was no end in sight.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | LEE MARGULIES
Faye Dunaway and Richard Widmark are starring in "Cold Sassy Tree," an adaptation of the Olive Ann Burns novel for the TNT cable channel. Widmark plays a widowed grandfather who falls in love with Dunaway's milliner character. Briefly noted: Reruns of "The Golden Girls" will join the NBC daytime schedule July 5, replacing "Wheel of Fortune," which is moving to CBS. . . . "Freddy's Nightmares" has been renewed for a second season in syndication, with 22 new episodes ordered. Robert Englund will be back as Freddy Krueger, host and occasional featured villain in the thriller anthology series.
BOOKS
April 14, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
TWO GARDENERS A Friendship in Letters By Katharine S. White and Elizabeth Lawrence Edited by Emily Herring Wilson Beacon Press: 274 pp., $25 Following her book, "Onward and Upward in the Garden" and her column of the same name that ran in the New Yorker from 1958 until her death in 1977, Katherine White's fans were legion.
BOOKS
April 12, 1998 | ANDREW SCULL, Andrew Scull is the author, most recently, of "Masters of Bedlam: The Transformation of the Mad-Doctoring Trade" (Princeton University Press)
Roy Porter is a phenomenon. Among general readers on this side of the Atlantic, he is perhaps best known for his learned and dazzlingly entertaining history of London, and for his rich and rollicking social history of England in the 18th century. British audiences encounter him in a variety of other guises: as an astonishingly prolific reviewer of books on all manner of subjects and as a ubiquitous presence on television and radio, wittily discoursing on any number of historical themes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
* * "There and Back: The Roy Porter Story," Roy Porter with David Keller, Louisiana State University Press ($24.95). Porter, an ex-drummer in Los Angeles, goes beyond the familiar litany of alcoholism, addiction, imprisonment and regeneration to recount some useful memories of L.A.'s Central Avenue scene in the 1940s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Woodford Roy Porter, 87, the first black chairman of the University of Louisville Board of Trustees and a champion of healthcare, education and the arts, died Sunday after a long battle with numerous illnesses. Porter, a grandson of slaves, was the first black person to be a member of the Louisville Board of Education and was its first black chairman. A member of the university board for 24 years, he served four terms as chairman. He retired in 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2002 | From Associated Press
Roy Porter, a writer and historian who attracted an international readership, has died. He was 55. Porter, author of an acclaimed history of London and several other well-received books, was found lying in a road beside his bicycle Sunday. He died in a hospital near his home in southern England a short time later. His death is under investigation. Porter had recently retired from the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London.
BOOKS
April 12, 1998 | ANDREW SCULL, Andrew Scull is the author, most recently, of "Masters of Bedlam: The Transformation of the Mad-Doctoring Trade" (Princeton University Press)
Roy Porter is a phenomenon. Among general readers on this side of the Atlantic, he is perhaps best known for his learned and dazzlingly entertaining history of London, and for his rich and rollicking social history of England in the 18th century. British audiences encounter him in a variety of other guises: as an astonishingly prolific reviewer of books on all manner of subjects and as a ubiquitous presence on television and radio, wittily discoursing on any number of historical themes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1998 | PATRICK KERKSTRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a packed house at The Main Event on La Brea Avenue on Saturday afternoon. Well-dressed patrons sipped Scotch and water, listened to the performances of local jazz favorites, and sat back to reflect on the life and talents of the late Roy Porter--jazz drummer and Los Angeles bebop legend. "We pioneered the bebop movement out here in 1945," recalled venerated saxophonist Teddy Edwards, who played and recorded with Porter many times. "That man was my good friend.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | LEE MARGULIES
Faye Dunaway and Richard Widmark are starring in "Cold Sassy Tree," an adaptation of the Olive Ann Burns novel for the TNT cable channel. Widmark plays a widowed grandfather who falls in love with Dunaway's milliner character. Briefly noted: Reruns of "The Golden Girls" will join the NBC daytime schedule July 5, replacing "Wheel of Fortune," which is moving to CBS. . . . "Freddy's Nightmares" has been renewed for a second season in syndication, with 22 new episodes ordered. Robert Englund will be back as Freddy Krueger, host and occasional featured villain in the thriller anthology series.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist-composer Horace Silver has long been known for his melodic gifts, as represented in such memorable jazz songs as "Senor Blues," "Song for My Father" and "Nica's Dream"--all standards of the modern jazz repertoire. Now, with "Rockin' With Rachmaninoff," which will debut tonight and Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Gallery Theater at Barnsdall Park in Hollywood, Silver expands his horizons.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
Central Avenue past came to Central Avenue present Saturday for the reopening of MOCA at the Temporary Contemporary. And it did so with style and gusto. The celebration was titled "Jazz Returns To Central Avenue"--appropriately so because the Temporary Contemporary sits at the terminus of what was, in the '30 and '40s, one of the most vital musical thoroughfares in the history of jazz and rhythm & blues.
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