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November 6, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES
Before he was out of his teens, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart had written no fewer than 10 operas. These weren't short, modest items, either. A few, to be sure, were comic works, although even some of these ran several hours. But a number were written as opera seria, the large-scale 18th-Century opera form in which serious, heroic and mythic themes prevailed. Such a work was "Lucio Silla," composed when Mozart was 16.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES
Before he was out of his teens, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart had written no fewer than 10 operas. These weren't short, modest items, either. A few, to be sure, were comic works, although even some of these ran several hours. But a number were written as opera seria, the large-scale 18th-Century opera form in which serious, heroic and mythic themes prevailed. Such a work was "Lucio Silla," composed when Mozart was 16.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2001
Paula Weston Solano performs her solo play, "Appearances." Directed and developed by Jessica Kubzansky, the play follows the lives of six Asian women--a Hong Kong-born interior designer, an urban Vietnamese American teenager, a Beverly Hills socialite, a Chinese immigrant and her American-born daughter and granddaughter--from 1926 to the present.* "Appearances," Met Theatre, 1089 N. Oxford Ave., L.A. Sundays, 2 p.m.; Mondays, 8 p.m. Ends July 9. $12. (323) 242-4290.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1999
Cantor Jonathan Grant isn't just any old cantor. He's also an operatic singer. Since joining Temple Bat Yahm five years ago, he's staged a concert each year. This time around, he'll share the bill for "To Life! Songs of Celebration" with Tony-winner Nell Carter and Rabbi Jay Levy, who produced and performed on Carter's "To Life! Songs of Chanukah and Other Jewish Celebrations" recording. "To Life! Songs of Celebration," Temple Bat Yahm, 1011 Camelback St., Newport Beach. 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Weird but sometimes wonderful productions are the stock in trade at Long Beach Opera, where impresario Michael Milenski has been confounding, delighting and enraging his patrons since even before the company had a name and was merely an extracurricular activity of the Long Beach Symphony. Opening his 14th year, Sunday in Center Theater at the Long Beach Convention Center, Milenski did it again.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bartok's only opera, "Duke Bluebeard's Castle," has thrived in concert halls and on disc, but not the theater stage. Too symbolic, too abstract, it has been felt--"I am eagerly looking forward to hearing 'Bluebeard's Castle' with closed eyes," wrote Ernest Lert, who produced the first performances outside Hungary, "and have Bartok's music stir up again all the beauty and all the terror I felt when I first read that great score."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
However bad you may think your family is, it is not as bad as Elektra's. Her father sacrificed her sister in return for a favorable wind to guide his ship home. Her mother, and her mother's lover, turned on her father, slaying him in his bath. Bent on avenging that murder, Elektra helped her brother kill their mother and her lover and then danced on their graves.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2001 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Long Beach Opera has firmly established its reputation for intelligent iconoclasm, and that's one reason why multidisciplinary artists such as designer Marsha Ginsberg feel at home with the maverick company. A photographer and installation artist, she has been working in theater and opera for a decade now, and she thinks of her work in both the visual and performing arts as of a piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2002 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
On Tuesday nights, San Francisco's opera patrons dress. Anything else goes in this proudly permissive city, but society stays high. So, on a recent Tuesday afternoon, Pamela Rosenberg, who became general director of the San Francisco Opera last year, isn't quite sure how the evening audience will respond to the opening of a new production of Handel's "Alcina." "They're the toughest crowd, the biggest sponsors," she says in her airy office.
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