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Roy Riegels

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SPORTS
January 2, 1986 | Scott Ostler
For Wrong Way Roy Riegels, for the last 57 years, it's been lonely at the bottom. Now Riegels has company. Roy Riegels is the Cal center whose wrong-way run with a recovered fumble in the '29 Rose Bowl led directly to a loss to Georgia Tech. For 57 years, Riegels' run has stood as the standard of futility against which all other bonehead plays and nightmare performances are measured. For 57 years, none could compare. Now . . . Roy, meet Ronnie.
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SPORTS
January 1, 1999 | BUD GREENSPAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many football fans still believe that Roy Riegels of the University of California ran the wrong way and scored a touchdown for the opponent, Georgia Tech, thereby giving the Ramblin' Wreck an 8-7 victory in the 1929 Rose Bowl game. The fact and legend connected with the play have become so intertwined through the decades that only an "instant replay" of rare black-and-white film, slowed down to frame-by-frame stop motion, can determine exactly what happened.
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SPORTS
March 27, 1993 | SHAV GLICK
Roy Riegels, whose wrong-way run during the 1929 Rose Bowl game ranks among the most famous plays in football history, died Friday in his sleep at his home in Woodland, Calif. He was 83. Riegels was the California center when he picked up a Georgia Tech fumble on Tech's 20-yard-line, spun around and ran in the wrong direction toward his own goal. California quarterback Benny Lom, sensing what was wrong, pursued Riegels, but could not catch him until he reached the one-yard-line.
SPORTS
April 10, 1993
Roy Riegels can rest in peace. History now has Chris Webber to kick around. LLOYD PEYTON Los Angeles
SPORTS
April 10, 1993
Roy Riegels can rest in peace. History now has Chris Webber to kick around. LLOYD PEYTON Los Angeles
SPORTS
January 1, 1999 | BUD GREENSPAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many football fans still believe that Roy Riegels of the University of California ran the wrong way and scored a touchdown for the opponent, Georgia Tech, thereby giving the Ramblin' Wreck an 8-7 victory in the 1929 Rose Bowl game. The fact and legend connected with the play have become so intertwined through the decades that only an "instant replay" of rare black-and-white film, slowed down to frame-by-frame stop motion, can determine exactly what happened.
SPORTS
August 9, 1991 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 63 years have gone by since Roy Riegels scooped up a Georgia Tech fumble, spun around and ran 65 yards toward his own goal line, but that run by the California center who became known as Wrong Way Riegels remains the single most famous--or infamous--play in Rose Bowl history. Riegels, now 83 and afflicted with Parkinson's disease, was on hand Thursday when he and nine other college football personalities were inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
May 4, 1989 | Associated Press
Funeral services were held Wednesday for John (Stumpy) Thomason, 83, whose fumble in the 1929 Rose Bowl game led to the "Wrong Way Riegels" play in Georgia Tech's 8-7 victory. Thomason, a retired automobile dealer and a member of the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame, played halfback at Georgia Tech in 1927-1929. It was in the second quarter of the Rose Bowl that California center Roy Riegels scooped Thomason's fumble and went 66 yards in the wrong direction before he realized his mistake, turned around and was tackled by Georgia Tech at his 1-yard line.
SPORTS
October 31, 1991 | MICHAEL ITAGAKI
Calvary Chapel linebacker Jake Guild's run to glory last Saturday was 80 yards away . . . but the wrong way. With the Eagles holding a 13-0 second-quarter lead on a rainy night at Orange Coast College, Guild first tipped a La Verne Lutheran pass, then spun around to catch the loose ball at the La Verne Lutheran 20. Then, slightly disoriented and seeing only open field between him and an end zone, he bolted for it. "I was in disbelief," Calvary Chapel Coach Kris Van Hook said.
SPORTS
May 5, 1985 | JIM MURRAY
Some guys go into halls of fame with spikes flashing, fists flying, banners waving, crowds roaring. Others back in, tiptoe through, get dragged in. Quite a few get there, so to speak, by mistake. Roy Riegels ran the wrong way. Fred Merkle forgot to touch second base. Fred Snodgrass dropped a fly ball. Gene Tunney stayed down for a Long Count. Dempsey didn't go to a neutral corner. Sharkey fouled Schmeling. Two Americans, Rey Robinson and Eddie Hart missed their starting time in the Olympics.
SPORTS
March 27, 1993 | SHAV GLICK
Roy Riegels, whose wrong-way run during the 1929 Rose Bowl game ranks among the most famous plays in football history, died Friday in his sleep at his home in Woodland, Calif. He was 83. Riegels was the California center when he picked up a Georgia Tech fumble on Tech's 20-yard-line, spun around and ran in the wrong direction toward his own goal. California quarterback Benny Lom, sensing what was wrong, pursued Riegels, but could not catch him until he reached the one-yard-line.
SPORTS
August 9, 1991 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 63 years have gone by since Roy Riegels scooped up a Georgia Tech fumble, spun around and ran 65 yards toward his own goal line, but that run by the California center who became known as Wrong Way Riegels remains the single most famous--or infamous--play in Rose Bowl history. Riegels, now 83 and afflicted with Parkinson's disease, was on hand Thursday when he and nine other college football personalities were inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
January 2, 1986 | Scott Ostler
For Wrong Way Roy Riegels, for the last 57 years, it's been lonely at the bottom. Now Riegels has company. Roy Riegels is the Cal center whose wrong-way run with a recovered fumble in the '29 Rose Bowl led directly to a loss to Georgia Tech. For 57 years, Riegels' run has stood as the standard of futility against which all other bonehead plays and nightmare performances are measured. For 57 years, none could compare. Now . . . Roy, meet Ronnie.
SPORTS
July 14, 1993 | JOHN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paul Zimmerman was dozing in an easy chair, all decked out in a pale orange sweater, as a visitor popped in on him in his room Tuesday at Freedom Village in Lake Forest. He had a TV remote clicker next to him and a screen a few feet away. His feet were propped up on a stool, and he looked to be comfortable. But the screen was blank, the room was silent and there wasn't much action anywhere. No books, magazines or newspapers in sight for a man who spent his life in type. He smiled a hello.
SPORTS
April 14, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's the biggest blunder in sports history? * Roy Riegels' wrong-way 67-yard run in the 1929 Rose Bowl? * The Red Sox selling Babe Ruth to the Yankees? * Mickey Owen's dropped third strike in the 1941 World Series, the play that may have cost the Dodgers a championship? World class foul-ups all, but there's another that ranks right up there.
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