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Roy Rodgers

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NEWS
July 10, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
A photographer from The Times called me 15 or 20 years ago, happy about an assignment she had just been given. She had to shoot Roy Rogers. I was jealous. I had grown up watching Roy on TV, with his wife, Dale Evans, and his horse Trigger, and her horse Buttermilk, and their dog Bullet, and their sidekick Pat Brady, and of course their car Nellybelle, which was Pat's broken-down old Jeep, back in the days before a cowboy had to pay 20 or 30 grand for a really reliable sport utility vehicle.
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NEWS
July 10, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
A photographer from The Times called me 15 or 20 years ago, happy about an assignment she had just been given. She had to shoot Roy Rogers. I was jealous. I had grown up watching Roy on TV, with his wife, Dale Evans, and his horse Trigger, and her horse Buttermilk, and their dog Bullet, and their sidekick Pat Brady, and of course their car Nellybelle, which was Pat's broken-down old Jeep, back in the days before a cowboy had to pay 20 or 30 grand for a really reliable sport utility vehicle.
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NATIONAL
January 15, 2010 | By Andy Reid
Fears of a new "super snake" emerging in the Everglades grew this week during a hunt to track South Florida's invasive python population. A three-day, state-coordinated hunt that started Tuesday had, by Wednesday, turned up at least five African rock pythons -- including a 14-foot-long female -- in a targeted area in Miami-Dade County. Those findings add to concerns that the African rock python is a new breeding population in the Everglades and not just the result of a few overgrown pets being released into the wild, according to the South Florida Water Management District.
BOOKS
July 10, 1994 | Kenneth Turan
Perhaps because it is the most quintessentially American of Hollywood genres, the Western is proving to be surprisingly durable both on the screen and on the page. And while current films leave a certain amount to be desired, two new books on the subject couldn't be bettered. At the top of the Western food chain were the dozens made by the great John Ford, films like "She Wore A Yellow Ribbon," "Wagonmaster," "Rio Grande," "The Searchers," "Two Rode Together" and "Cheyenne Autumn."
SPORTS
September 10, 1991 | MIKE DOWNEY
An announcement will be made later this week that the California Angels are about to appoint a new executive to take control of the team, this column has exclusively learned. Reliable sources report that the Angels will have the pleasure of introducing the popularly apocryphal John Doe as their new vice president and chief executive officer of titular operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1996 | KELLEY DAVID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a fit of Conejo Valley Days fever, about 30 local residents traded in their street clothes Thursday evening for Western duds as they competed for the title of best-dressed cowgirl--and cowboy. For the first time, men and children were invited to join what has traditionally been the exclusive domain of Thousand Oaks cowgirls--the Women's Western Wear contest.
OPINION
November 14, 1993 | Steven D. Stark, Steven D. Stark, who has written for the Atlantic and the Washington Post, is a commentator for National Public Radio
Most of the reasons why many Americans oppose the North American Free Trade Agreement have been put on the table. But the Al Gore-Ross Perot debate illustrated there's another factor lurking, one people don't like to mention in polite company: Sadly, many Americans distrust Mexicans and hardly see them as equals. Why else could Perot dismiss an entire race, as when he said of Mexicans, "People who don't make anything can't buy anything"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2000 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through the haze of six decades and hundreds of baseball diamonds and baseball towns, ballplayers recall the orange blossoms of Anaheim. They see the towering palm trees surrounding their park and remember the tidy little baseball field inside, the short walk from downtown, then only a few blocks long. In the evenings, they stopped at wooden fruit stands and filled paper sacks, then raised their hotel windows and ate as March breezes rolled over their aching bodies.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed in bib overalls, a railroader's denim cap and red bandanna, 79-year-old Otis Roy crooned in a drawling voice for a crowd of shoppers at an outdoor market in San Dimas. "I got a barrel of flour," he sang. "Lord, I got a bucket of lard. I ain't got no blues. . . . Got corn in my crib, cotton growing in my patch." His audience seemed intrigued, even if none were likely to recognize the song, "No Hard Times."
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
The words "normal" and "divorce" don't show up together very often. But USC sociologist Constance R. Ahrons says it's about time they did. Instead of defining divorce in the traditional negative terms--failed marriages, broken homes--she said we should see it for what it is: a valid societal institution. "Divorce in our society is as much an institution as marriage," Ahrons said Saturday at the USC-sponsored Orange County Academic Symposium at the Irvine Hilton and Towers, "so it's best for us to normalize it and help people find ways to do it better.
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