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Roy Sakioka

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Sakioka, a self-effacing man who has made his fortune in farming and development, has never been one to seek publicity. But in recent years this 92-year-old Japanese immigrant, who lives in a modest Costa Mesa ranch house, has been unable to avoid the spotlight he has shunned for so long. Last year he donated $100,000 to the White Memorial Medical Center Foundation to show his appreciation of the Los Angeles hospital, which in 1988 implanted a pacemaker in his heart.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Sakioka, a self-effacing man who has made his fortune in farming and development, has never been one to seek publicity. But in recent years this 92-year-old Japanese immigrant, who lives in a modest Costa Mesa ranch house, has been unable to avoid the spotlight he has shunned for so long. Last year he donated $100,000 to the White Memorial Medical Center Foundation to show his appreciation of the Los Angeles hospital, which in 1988 implanted a pacemaker in his heart.
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NEWS
May 21, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Berkman is a Times staff writer.
As he has done for years, the slightly built, 90-year-old farmer treads the long rows of celery, inspecting the crop that thrives in the heavy black soil of his Costa Mesa fields. Occasionally, close to harvest time, he slashes off a stalk and takes a bite to test its quality. In another field, he picks a head of cabbage and tears off a leaf for inspection. That is how a farmer nurtures his crop. It is a task--rather, a labor of love--that has not changed with time. Other things do change.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Berkman is a Times staff writer.
As he has done for years, the slightly built, 90-year-old farmer treads the long rows of celery, inspecting the crop that thrives in the heavy black soil of his Costa Mesa fields. Occasionally, close to harvest time, he slashes off a stalk and takes a bite to test its quality. In another field, he picks a head of cabbage and tears off a leaf for inspection. That is how a farmer nurtures his crop. It is a task--rather, a labor of love--that has not changed with time. Other things do change.
REAL ESTATE
April 9, 1989 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
When developer Roger Torriero wanted to buy a 66-acre parcel in Santa Ana, he opened negotiations with Roy Sakioka, patriarch of the family that owned much of the land, with a fine piece of sashimi. Then, as the story goes, Sakioka, a 90-year-old farmer who immigrated from Japan in 1913, agreed to sell his 53 acres of cabbage and cucumber fields. "Believe me, that didn't seal the deal," said George Sakioka, the patriarch's grandson, referring to the sashimi. "We appreciated the offering of the fine albacore . . . but the way we do business, a deal has to make economic sense."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1994
Some of Orange County's richest people have gotten even richer. According to the newly released annual Forbes 400 Richest People in America list, Donald Bren, the 62-year-old chairman of the Irvine Co., jumped from No. 54 in 1993 to No. 35 this time, with a net worth of $2 billion. That's up from $1.3 billion last year. Anne Catherine Getty Earhart, 42, of Laguna Beach has a rank of 189 with $550 million to her name, up from $400 million last year.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | BEA MAXWELL
Pacemaker recipient, 91-year-old Roy Sakioka, presented a donation of $100,000 to Frank Mendicina, president of White Memorial Medical Center Foundation, at a ceremony Jan. 11. Sakioka received a pacemaker in 1988, and the donation reflects his appreciation of the hospital and its medical staff. The funds are earmarked for the hospital's cardiac services. * The American Diabetes Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1993
In Santa Ana, the developer of a mall has donated 60 feet of property to the city for a street widening. In Costa Mesa, a businessman donated a chunk of his farm to the city for a new firehouse. Such public spirit would be applauded at any time; in this tough economic spell, the gifts are even more welcome.
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Sixteen employees of a state correctional facility near Camarillo alleged this week in a lawsuit that they suffered medical problems after pesticides were sprayed negligently on an adjacent field. The suit, filed Monday in Ventura County Superior Court, says the employees suffered dizziness, swollen glands, nausea, headaches, breathing difficulties and chest pains after Pleasant Valley Helicopters sprayed an adjacent broccoli field with a pesticide called "Monitor."
BUSINESS
October 6, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Orange County's wealthiest people, especially those who profited from the real estate boom of the 1980s, events of the '90s are not necessarily fortuitous. When Forbes magazine on Monday released its list of the 400 richest people in America, some Orange County residents were conspicuous by their absences. Declining real estate values bumped two well-known millionaires off the list, for which the cutoff point is $265 million. Gone are local developer William Lyon, 70, who ranked No.
REAL ESTATE
April 9, 1989 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
When developer Roger Torriero wanted to buy a 66-acre parcel in Santa Ana, he opened negotiations with Roy Sakioka, patriarch of the family that owned much of the land, with a fine piece of sashimi. Then, as the story goes, Sakioka, a 90-year-old farmer who immigrated from Japan in 1913, agreed to sell his 53 acres of cabbage and cucumber fields. "Believe me, that didn't seal the deal," said George Sakioka, the patriarch's grandson, referring to the sashimi. "We appreciated the offering of the fine albacore . . . but the way we do business, a deal has to make economic sense."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1993 | LYNDA NATALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new fire station sits on the edge of a cucumber and onion field, its unusual blue glass atrium and white tile walls gleaming over the freshly tilled land. The station, which officially opens today, cost more than $3.4 million to build and equip. Architecturally, it is unlike any of its brown stucco predecessors. Among the important facilities it provides fire protection for are the Orange County Performing Arts Center and South Coast Plaza.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Katsumasa (Roy) Sakioka, who overcame prejudice, wartime internment and chronic shyness to become one of the nation's richest men, has died. He was 96. At its zenith, Sakioka's spectacular land empire included 1,000 prized acres in Orange County alone, where he was among the first to envision the coming real estate boom.
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