Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoy Thomson Hall
IN THE NEWS

Roy Thomson Hall

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
David O. Russell's boisterous, crowd-pleasing comedy “Silver Linings Playbook” won the BlackBerry People's Choice Award at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival on Sunday. Because the festival is non-competitive and has no jury, the People's Choice prize is widely viewed as the event's most coveted award, at least from the perspective of positioning a movie for an awards-season launch. PHOTOS: Toronto International Film Festival 2012 Past winners include “Slumdog Millionaire," “The King's Speech” and "American Beauty" - films that went on to take the Academy Award for best picture.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
David O. Russell's boisterous, crowd-pleasing comedy “Silver Linings Playbook” won the BlackBerry People's Choice Award at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival on Sunday. Because the festival is non-competitive and has no jury, the People's Choice prize is widely viewed as the event's most coveted award, at least from the perspective of positioning a movie for an awards-season launch. PHOTOS: Toronto International Film Festival 2012 Past winners include “Slumdog Millionaire," “The King's Speech” and "American Beauty" - films that went on to take the Academy Award for best picture.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
TORONTO -- The Toronto International Film Festival kicked off Thursday night with a peek into the future -- in more ways than one. The festival's annual opening-night gala at the city's upscale Roy Thomson Hall featured the world premiere of "Looper," Rian Johnson's dystopian time-travel tale about a hit man circa 2044 named Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt). Joe is a "looper," tasked with offing mob targets sent from the future. But he finds himself in a pickle when he is unable to shoot a target who is a future version of himself (Bruce Willis)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
TORONTO -- Ben Affleck's crowd-pleasing political thriller “Argo” earned a few ovations when it played at the Telluride Film Festival last week, but, really, the screening there was just a warm-up act to its Toronto gala premiere Friday night. “Any self-respecting Canadian of a particular age knows what happened,” said festival chief operating officer Michele Maheux, introducing the film and its actor-director Ben Affleck. “Now, through 'Argo,' we discover the how.” There were plenty of self-respecting Canadians of a particular vintage seated in the cavernous Roy Thomson Hall, and they cheered loudly and often throughout the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
TORONTO -- Ben Affleck's crowd-pleasing political thriller “Argo” earned a few ovations when it played at the Telluride Film Festival last week, but, really, the screening there was just a warm-up act to its Toronto gala premiere Friday night. “Any self-respecting Canadian of a particular age knows what happened,” said festival chief operating officer Michele Maheux, introducing the film and its actor-director Ben Affleck. “Now, through 'Argo,' we discover the how.” There were plenty of self-respecting Canadians of a particular vintage seated in the cavernous Roy Thomson Hall, and they cheered loudly and often throughout the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
— The Canadian filmmaker Atom Egoyan steps off the elevator in Toronto's new Bell Lightbox building and, worrying aloud that his video installation honoring Fellini's "81/2 " has been "drooping," ducks into the exhibition space. A moment later he emerges. "Now artist-approved," he proclaims. "No drooping. " The scene might as well be a metaphor for Bell Lightbox as a whole. The grandiose, $129-million screening and exhibition venue opened last week to a mostly favorable reception — after years of delays and bureaucratic tussles had created public unease about the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The Toronto International Film Festival holds a special place for Robert Redford — Redford the filmmaker that is, not the actor, entrepreneur, man behind his own monster festival in Sundance. Each time, the invitation to bring a film to Toronto has come as an unexpected gift. In 1992, his poetic drama of brothers and fly fishing, "A River Runs Through It," was embraced by the city's film-loving crowd, which helped quell studio nerves about its languid pacing. Far more is riding on this trip.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
TORONTO -- It's fitting that the Toronto International Film Festival opened its 2013 edition Thursday night with the Wikileaks drama "The Fifth Estate. " That's true because the Bill Condon movie about Julian Assange is an elaborate Hollywood production with a layer of seriousness -- "interested in what makes people tick," as TIFF's Cameron Bailey described its director before the screening -- and Toronto tends to like elaborate Hollywood productions with a layer of seriousness. But it's also true because the moviegoing season that Toronto unofficially kicks off is going to be filled with movies like this -- based on complicated real-life personalities, and trying, with admittedly varying degrees of success, to tell us as much about ourselves as about them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
TORONTO -- Alan Arkin knew he wanted to act by his 5th birthday. He dragged his mother to the Crossroads of the World on Sunset Boulevard when he was 11 so he could sign up for a specious organization called The Screen Children's Guild. Nothing came of that, but the 78-year-old actor has been making a pretty good living for nearly half a century. Arkin has seen a thing or two, and he has a few thoughts about why movies connect with audiences. Sitting in the back row of the cavernous Roy Thomson Hall Theatre for the Toronto Film Festival's gala screening of Ben Affleck's politically tinged thriller "Argo," Arkin watched and listened while the audience cheered the story.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2003 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
As the World Health Organization lifted its warning against traveling to SARS-struck Toronto on Tuesday, cultural officials in the Canadian city hoped that an epidemic of postponed performances by U.S. artists would reverse itself, and that a dip in attendance at museums, plays and concerts during the outbreak would end.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
TORONTO -- The Toronto International Film Festival kicked off Thursday night with a peek into the future -- in more ways than one. The festival's annual opening-night gala at the city's upscale Roy Thomson Hall featured the world premiere of "Looper," Rian Johnson's dystopian time-travel tale about a hit man circa 2044 named Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt). Joe is a "looper," tasked with offing mob targets sent from the future. But he finds himself in a pickle when he is unable to shoot a target who is a future version of himself (Bruce Willis)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
— The Canadian filmmaker Atom Egoyan steps off the elevator in Toronto's new Bell Lightbox building and, worrying aloud that his video installation honoring Fellini's "81/2 " has been "drooping," ducks into the exhibition space. A moment later he emerges. "Now artist-approved," he proclaims. "No drooping. " The scene might as well be a metaphor for Bell Lightbox as a whole. The grandiose, $129-million screening and exhibition venue opened last week to a mostly favorable reception — after years of delays and bureaucratic tussles had created public unease about the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The Toronto International Film Festival holds a special place for Robert Redford — Redford the filmmaker that is, not the actor, entrepreneur, man behind his own monster festival in Sundance. Each time, the invitation to bring a film to Toronto has come as an unexpected gift. In 1992, his poetic drama of brothers and fly fishing, "A River Runs Through It," was embraced by the city's film-loving crowd, which helped quell studio nerves about its languid pacing. Far more is riding on this trip.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik and Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Toronto — By the end of the first weekend of last year's Toronto International Film Festival, a trio of movies — "The King's Speech," "127 Hours" and "Black Swan" — had emerged as clear front-runners for the coming Oscar season. This year? Not so much. As the weekend draws to a close, no prototypical awards title has risen above the fray. Instead, it's lighter fare such as Jennifer Westfeldt's marital comedy "Friends With Kids" and Lasse Hallström's quirky satire "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen" that are generating the most attention, with the latter selling to CBS Films for about $4 million on Sunday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Severns, Los Angeles impresario for six decades who managed the Greek Theatre, the Hollywood Bowl and the Philharmonic and then built the Music Center of Los Angeles County and ran it for 20 years, has died. He was 88. Severns, who retired from active administration in 1984 but continued to consult for various arts programs around the world, died Dec. 29 in Los Angeles of heart failure.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|