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Roy Walford

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Roy Walford, the free-spirited UCLA gerontologist who pioneered the idea of restricting food intake to extend life span and practiced the concept rigorously in an effort to live to 120, has died. He was 79. Although he was an accomplished scientist with more than 330 scientific papers and eight books to his credit, Walford was probably better known for the two-year stint he spent with seven other adventurers in Biosphere 2, a self-contained human terrarium near Tucson.
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HEALTH
October 20, 2012 | Rosie Mestel
For 10 years, Joe Cordell has been living a life diametrically opposed to that of most Americans: Instead of eating too much, he's deliberately been eating too little. The 54-year-old St. Louis lawyer was inspired by the science that suggests that serious calorie restriction (CR) could significantly lengthen a creature's life span, as well as ward off diseases of old age. We spoke with Cordell about his diet of about 1,900 calories a day. He says he felt "mildly disappointed" but not dissuaded by a recent study that showed calorie restriction didn't prolong the life of monkeys -- although it did seem to help ward off cancer.
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HEALTH
October 20, 2012 | Rosie Mestel
For 10 years, Joe Cordell has been living a life diametrically opposed to that of most Americans: Instead of eating too much, he's deliberately been eating too little. The 54-year-old St. Louis lawyer was inspired by the science that suggests that serious calorie restriction (CR) could significantly lengthen a creature's life span, as well as ward off diseases of old age. We spoke with Cordell about his diet of about 1,900 calories a day. He says he felt "mildly disappointed" but not dissuaded by a recent study that showed calorie restriction didn't prolong the life of monkeys -- although it did seem to help ward off cancer.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
For 10 years, Joe Cordell has been living a life diametrically opposed to that of most Americans: Instead of eating too much, he's deliberately been eating too little. The 54-year-old St. Louis lawyer was inspired by the science that suggests that calorie restriction of this type could significantly lengthen a creature's life span, as well as ward off diseases of old age. We spoke with Cordell about how he got into calorie restriction, what his daily diet is like -- and what his wife of 21 years and his two teenage daughters feel about it. We asked him what he felt about a new study that didn't prolong the life of calorie-restricted monkeys -- although it did seem to help ward off cancer.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
For 10 years, Joe Cordell has been living a life diametrically opposed to that of most Americans: Instead of eating too much, he's deliberately been eating too little. The 54-year-old St. Louis lawyer was inspired by the science that suggests that calorie restriction of this type could significantly lengthen a creature's life span, as well as ward off diseases of old age. We spoke with Cordell about how he got into calorie restriction, what his daily diet is like -- and what his wife of 21 years and his two teenage daughters feel about it. We asked him what he felt about a new study that didn't prolong the life of calorie-restricted monkeys -- although it did seem to help ward off cancer.
HEALTH
November 25, 2002 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
For nearly three decades, Dr. Roy Walford has lived in a red-brick industrial building a half-block from the daily carnival and weekend hucksters of Venice Beach. And for much of that time, Walford, a UCLA professor who pioneered the concept of a severely calorie-restrictive diet as a path to human longevity, was commonly viewed as a bit of an oddball, even in a neighborhood known for eccentric behavior.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
A 66-year-old UCLA physician, a botanist and a marine biologist were among four men and four women picked today to spend two years inside a 2 1/4-acre sealed dome here intended to be amicrocosm of Earth. The eight will be the crew of the giant terrarium known as Biosphere II. The privately financed $30-million project aims for a December start. Biosphere II will resemble a space colony tethered to Earth.
HEALTH
May 31, 1999 | SHARI ROAN
STEALING TIME The New Science of Aging Rubin Tarrant Productions, in association with PBS and Devillier Donegan Enterprises Wednesday, 8-11 p.m. KCET * Rarely has the process of aging been explained as clearly and delightfully as in this gem, "Stealing Time." The three-part program will premiere in its entirety Wednesday and is guaranteed to hold interest.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
Imperialist Romans, according to the contemporary gourmand Apicius, adored their feasts of stuffed sow's womb and honeyed wine, sometimes followed by purging to make room for more. In our overabundant times, it's the opposite: We're obsessed with cutting back calories, fats, entire food groups -- or eliminating food altogether. Below, some memorable moments in zealous eating and not-eating.
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
One of the eight environmentalists sealed inside a gigantic greenhouse in Arizona accidentally cut off the tip of her left middle finger Wednesday morning and may have to be removed from the closed system briefly for further surgery, a spokeswoman for the project said Thursday. Jane Poynter, 29, was operating a rice-hulling machine in the agricultural area of Biosphere 2 when she accidentally stuck her finger in too far, Kathleen Dyhr said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Roy Walford, the free-spirited UCLA gerontologist who pioneered the idea of restricting food intake to extend life span and practiced the concept rigorously in an effort to live to 120, has died. He was 79. Although he was an accomplished scientist with more than 330 scientific papers and eight books to his credit, Walford was probably better known for the two-year stint he spent with seven other adventurers in Biosphere 2, a self-contained human terrarium near Tucson.
HEALTH
November 25, 2002 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
For nearly three decades, Dr. Roy Walford has lived in a red-brick industrial building a half-block from the daily carnival and weekend hucksters of Venice Beach. And for much of that time, Walford, a UCLA professor who pioneered the concept of a severely calorie-restrictive diet as a path to human longevity, was commonly viewed as a bit of an oddball, even in a neighborhood known for eccentric behavior.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2000 | JOEL GREENBERG, TIMES SCIENCE/MEDICINE EDITOR
Ah, to be old again. According to "Scientific American Frontiers' " presentation of "Never Say Die" (PBS tonight at 8) on KCET-TV, that might be the mantra of baby boomers as they live far beyond the current confines of old age. "Right now, a lot of serious, smart scientists are saying" it could be possible to double or even triple our life spans, says smart, semi-serious host Alan Alda.
NEWS
September 23, 1991
With a few exceptions, the crew of Biosphere II has been together for more than 10 years working on various ecological projects around the world. Many read science fiction extensively, and several play musical instruments. The biospherian co-captains are Sally Silverstone of Walthamstow, England, and Mark van Thillo of Antwerp, Belgium. Silverstone, 36, has a bachelor's degree in applied social studies from Sheffield Polytechnic College.
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