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Roy Walker

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
LeRoy Walker, the first African American to lead the U.S. Olympic Committee and the first black man to coach an American Olympic team, died Monday in Durham, N.C. He was 93. Walker's death was confirmed by Scarborough & Hargett Funeral home, but no cause was given. The grandson of slaves, Walker led the U.S. Olympic Committee from 1992 to 1996, shepherding the Summer Games staged in his native Atlanta and leading the group when the 2002 Winter Olympics were awarded to Salt Lake City.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
LeRoy Walker, the first African American to lead the U.S. Olympic Committee and the first black man to coach an American Olympic team, died Monday in Durham, N.C. He was 93. Walker's death was confirmed by Scarborough & Hargett Funeral home, but no cause was given. The grandson of slaves, Walker led the U.S. Olympic Committee from 1992 to 1996, shepherding the Summer Games staged in his native Atlanta and leading the group when the 2002 Winter Olympics were awarded to Salt Lake City.
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SPORTS
August 8, 1992
LeRoy Walker and the complaining athletes need to reassess their thinking about the U.S. basketball team. The Dream Team is guilty of only one charge: Being the most dominant collection of athletes in one of the most popular sports in Olympic history. The International Basketball Assn., not the United States, changed the eligibility rules to permit professional athletes to compete. Walker's concern that "We seem to have created first- and second-class Olympians," based on the residence of the athletes during the Olympics, misses the point.
SPORTS
July 23, 1995 | ARA NAJARIAN
The U.S. Olympic Committee met Saturday to decide the fate of the 1997 U.S. Olympic Festival and came up with a decision. Well, sort of. Officials said a Festival was "not likely" in 1997, but did not rule out the possibility of having one. The Festival had been moved to odd-numbered years because the Winter and Summer Olympics are now on alternating even years. But the size and the cost of the Festival have made it difficult to stage, so the switch was convenient.
SPORTS
August 5, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a lot of people, LeRoy Walker is tired to hearing U.S. athletes whine when they don't win gold medals. Unlike a lot of people, Walker may be in a position of teaching them better sportsmanship. In October, he is expected to be elected president of the U.S. Olympic Committee. "It's always some excuse with our athletes," he said. "It's never, 'My opponent was tough, I didn't get him today, I'll get him tomorrow and walk away.'
SPORTS
September 23, 1993 | RANDY HARVEY
Juan Antonio Samaranch of Spain, president of the International Olympic Committee since 1980, was elected to another four-year term Wednesday by the 89 voting members. With no opposition, Samaranch, 73, was elected by acclamation to preside over the Olympic movement through the Games of the Centennial, the 1996 Summer Olympics at Atlanta. Anita DeFrantz of Los Angeles, an IOC member since 1986, also was elected without opposition in her bid to remain on the powerful 11-member executive board.
SPORTS
August 17, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
John Krimsky Jr., who has helped pad America's Olympic pockets by negotiating multimillion-dollar sponsorship deals, was chosen interim executive director of the U.S. Olympic Committee. Krimsky, deputy secretary general and chief fund-raiser who has been with the USOC since 1986, was picked for the interim post in a conference call of the committee's executive board. Starting Oct.
SPORTS
October 27, 1993 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an action that could signal improved relations between two of the world's largest international organizations, the United Nations General Assembly has adopted a resolution proposed by the International Olympic Committee urging member nations to observe Olympic truces during the 1994 Winter Games in Lillehammer, Norway, and the 1996 Summer Games in Atlanta.
SPORTS
June 9, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LeRoy Walker, former chancellor of North Carolina Central University and now a vice president of Atlanta's organizing committee for the 1996 Summer Olympics, has been recommended by a nominating committee to become the U.S. Olympic Committee's next president. If Walker is elected by the board of directors during a session in October, he will become the USOC's first black president. Also recommended by the nominating committee were George Steinbrenner of Tampa, Fla.
SPORTS
September 6, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
The three-year search for a second International Olympic Committee member from the United States ended Monday, when James L. Easton of Van Nuys was elected at the conclusion of an IOC session in Paris. His selection is part of IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch's effort to strengthen representation of international sports federations within the 100-member organization. Easton, 59, is president of the international archery federation.
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