Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoyal Air Force
IN THE NEWS

Royal Air Force

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 18, 1997
ITT Gilfillan, a Van Nuys-based unit of ITT Defense & Electronics, has received a $4-million contract from the Ministry of Defense of the United Kingdom for its PAR-2000 Precision Approach Radar, the company said. The radar system, which will be used by the Royal Air Force, is able to operate in high winds and provide multirunway coverage on digital color displays. Along with PAR-2000 hardware and software, ITT Gilfillan will provide training and contractor logistics support for five years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Kate Middleton and Prince William have their hands full enough with their son Prince George, delaying any plans the royals might have for another royal baby, they revealed Monday during St. Patrick's Day festivities in England. The duke and duchess of Cambridge, 31 and 32, respectively, appeared at their first joint royal engagement of the year at Mons Barracks in Aldershot to visit the 1st Batallion Irish guards during a St. Patrick's Day parade. There, Catherine presented the officers and guardsmen with traditional sprigs of shamrocks.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | JOSEPH W. GRIGG, FOR UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
On Sept. 14, 1940, a hot, brilliantly sunny Sunday, Adolf Hitler's Nazi-controlled Berlin radio launched an all-out propaganda campaign to announce to the world the climax of what later became known as the Battle of Britain and the start of the German Luftwaffe's bombing blitz against London. Along with other foreign correspondents in Berlin, I was summoned to a special Sunday afternoon news conference at the Nazi Propaganda Ministry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
On the west side of Van Nuys Airport it's like World War II never ended. Vintage propeller planes once flown by U.S. Navy, Army Air Forces and Royal Air Force pilots are parked wingtip to wingtip along the taxiway. Nearby buildings are painted in camouflage. The sound of swing music sometimes drifts across the tarmac, and olive drab flight jackets are de rigueur. The planes and buildings belong to Condor Squadron, a nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring America's veterans and the public display of the North American AT-6/SNJ Texan - a sturdy two-seater that helped train tens of thousands of military pilots during World War II and the Korean War. The group and its members own eight of the planes, making Van Nuys the site of one of the largest collections of such aircraft in the nation.
NEWS
May 9, 1987 | BURT FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Robert Stanford-Tuck, considered by many World War II students as the greatest Spitfire pilot of all time, died Tuesday at his home in the seaside village of Sandwich Bay in England's picturesque county of Kent. The man officially credited with downing 30 planes and who may have shot down half a dozen more was 70. His two sons did not announce a cause of death.
NEWS
September 2, 1990
I thoroughly enjoyed "Masterpiece Theatre's" "Piece of Cake" on PBS. I was engrossed in every one of the six episodes. I always have had great admiration for this small, plucky group of pilots in the Royal Air Force which fought against great odds in the Battle of Britain during those dark days of World War II. "Piece of Cake" stood head and shoulders above the piles of garbage that are shown on TV. Frederick D. Mullen, Upland ...
WORLD
June 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain's military says soldiers and air force members will be allowed to wear their uniforms to this year's gay pride march in London. The military said it would permit British Army and Royal Air Force personnel to show off their military affiliation in the July 5 parade. The decision brings the forces in line with the Royal Navy, which allows sailors to participate in uniform. Britain began allowing gay men and women to serve openly in the military in 2000.
NEWS
October 21, 1986 | Associated Press
An American charged with the 1975 killing of a London police constable arrived in Britain today aboard a Royal Air Force jet after his extradition from the United States. William Joseph Quinn, once convicted in Ireland of being a member of the Irish Republican Army, was put aboard the jet at a U.S. Air Force base near San Francisco and arrived this morning at the Royal Air Force base at Brize Norton, near Oxford.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Spitfires and Hurricanes from Britain's "finest hour" in 1940 joined with jets representing the country's Persian Gulf force on Saturday in a salute to the Battle of Britain. The procession of 168 aircraft flew over Buckingham Palace, where Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip were waiting on the balcony at noon. Also in the royal party was Prince Harry, son of Prince Charles, who was celebrating his 6th birthday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Dame Felicity Peake, one of the British heroines of World War II who became the first leader of the peacetime Women's Royal Air Force, has died at the age of 89. Peake, who had homes in London and Oxfordshire, died Nov. 2 in London. Dashing and attractive in uniform, Peake was one of two women painted for widely circulated recruiting posters, and her face became easily recognized early in the war.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Kate Middleton, Prince William and St. James's Palace are revealing quite a bit about their royal baby preparations. It's a welcome change from the secrecy normally cloaking the royals. The palace has been much more forthcoming with some details ever since the announcement of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's engagement in November 2010. Royal watchers have said this is quite a departure for the family, which was once viewed as aloof and cold after the death of William's beloved mother, Princess Diana.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
For newlywed royals Prince William and Catherine, there's no evading the limelight. So in downtown Los Angeles on Saturday night, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will attempt to share it with a group of up-and-coming Britons in the film, television and video-game industries. As part of the couple's three-day trip to Southern California, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts has organized "Brits to Watch," a black-tie event at the Belasco Theater that will allow 42 young British actors, directors, producers and other professionals to rub elbows with Hollywood executives and celebrities — and thus raise their profiles stateside.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By Sheri Linden
Straightforward and solid but only mildly involving, "Winter in Wartime" is the coming-of-age story of a Dutch teen boy, set during the final months of World War II. Director Martin Koolhoven elicits strong performances in the handsomely photographed feature but fails to sustain tension, creating a work that's smooth and reassuring, never truly gripping. Based on a 1972 children's novel by Jan Terlouw, the film avoids troubling ambiguities, resolving each challenge or conflict almost as soon as it arises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Roderick Mann, a British-born show business writer who interviewed many of the world's biggest stars during a more than 40-year career that included serving as an entertainment columnist for the Los Angeles Times, died early Friday morning. He was 87. Mann, who had been battling dementia and the early stages of Alzheimer's disease the last 14 months, died of cardiopulmonary arrest at an assisted-living facility in Studio City, said his wife, Anastasia Kostoff Mann. In a journalism career that began in the late 1940s after he served as a Royal Air Force fighter pilot in World War II, Mann was the syndicated entertainment feature writer for London's Daily and Sunday Express from the 1950s through the '80s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2010 | Times wire services
British writer Alan Sillitoe, whose "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning" and "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner" chronicled the bleak postwar realities of Britain's poor, died Sunday. He was 82. The writer's son, David, said his father had died at London's Charing Cross Hospital but gave no other details. Sillitoe, a leading member of the 1950s group of so-called angry young men of British fiction, was acclaimed for his uncompromising social criticism and depiction of domestic tensions — often dubbed kitchen-sink dramas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2009 | Associated Press
Henry Allingham, at 113 the world's oldest man and a World War I veteran who spent his final years reminding Britain about the 9 million soldiers killed on all sides during the conflict, died Saturday at a care home in Ovingdean, near Brighton on England's south coast. Allingham was the last surviving original member of the Royal Air Force, which was formed in 1918. He made it a personal crusade to talk about a conflict that wiped out much of a generation. "I want everyone to know," he told the Associated Press during an interview in November.
NEWS
October 21, 1986
An American citizen suspected of being a former Irish Republican Army gunman was flown to England to face charges of murdering a London policeman. U.S. Atty.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Britain's Prince Charles shunned the spotlight Friday as he met with American achievers over lunch, accepted an invitation for tea with Vice President Dan Quayle and headed for Camp David, Md., for dinner with President Bush. On his eighth visit to the United States, Charles arrived alone aboard a Royal Air Force jet from New York for a low-key, 24-hour visit to the nation's capital. That contrasted sharply with his wife Diana's highly publicized tour of New York earlier this month.
WORLD
November 8, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
A British pilot who was suddenly blinded by a stroke during a solo flight was talked safely down by a military pilot, the Royal Air Force said. Jim O'Neill, 65, asked for help after he went blind 40 minutes into a flight from Scotland to southeastern England last week. The BBC reported that O'Neill, flying a small Cessna aircraft, lost his sight 5,500 feet in the air. Wing Commander Paul Gerrard, who was finishing a training flight nearby, was drafted to help. He located the plane and began flying close by and radioing directions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|